Re: Serious Computer Problem

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by hootnholler, Nov 19, 2003.

  1. hootnholler

    hootnholler Guest

    Barry has some great info in this post, but one more thing to add... those
    1.2 t birds have a tendency to run a bit toasty. If you check all that and
    still issues, check your temps. I usually like to run them about 50 C under
    full load, but they should handle upwards of 60 C. Your motherboard will
    cause random reboots if the cpu overtemps to the settings... Also, you
    didn't mention, if this is an asus a7v133 board, check for a bios update to
    the cpu temperature. It was a known problem, and could also be causing your
    issue. As Barry so eloquently pointed out, this could be a real brain fry,
    but you have enough info to keep ya busy for a while :)

    Hoot

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Almost ANYTHING in the computer can cause this. It can be a difficult
    > problem to solve.
    >
    > You are putting too much emphasis on power and the power supply. That
    > is not the most common cause. While it is certainly possible, if you
    > have tried a new power supply (but NOT the same model as the original
    > one), you have just about totally eliminated the totality of power
    > problems as a likely cause. Isolation of a computer from power line
    > problems is almost total with a decent power supply, and not
    > withstanding what the vendors of surge supressors would have you
    > believe, it's rare for power line issues to cause a problem with a
    > computer if the power supply in the computer is "good". I won't go into
    > exactly why, but in a modern switching power supply there is TREMENDOUS
    > isolation of the innards of a computer from the AC power mains. I do
    > believe that every computer should have a UPS because of power FAILURES,
    > but I NEVER recommend a "surge supressor" .... they just are not
    > necessary and are a waste of money.
    >
    > The most likely cause of this is memory problems, but you say that you
    > have replaced the memory.
    >
    > The next most likely cause is {brace yourself, you won't like this} the
    > motherboard.
    >
    > Yes, a bad CPU can cause this but that is fairly rare. It would be more
    > common for peripheral card to cause it. Suspect PCI cards first (sound
    > card, video card, network card, etc.).
    >
    > A bad disk drive (or any IDE device) can cause this, it's less common,
    > but it does happen. If you are overclocking and as a consequence have a
    > non-standard PCI bus or AGP bus clock rate, that is a common cause.
    >
    > In very rare cases, I have seen a USB device, also a PS/2 keyboard
    > and/or mouse, cause lockups and reboots. The Asus P4T-E, for some
    > reason, had a notorious history of not working with keyboards made in
    > the 1990's (really, most keyboards made at any time before about 2001),
    > and the symptoms, which included both spontaneous lockups and reboots,
    > did not in any way point to the keyboard. This was a keyboard
    > controller issue, and may be present in other motherboards as well.
    >
    > Software problems can cause this although it's not usually as random as
    > the problem that you are describing. You could try a fresh install of
    > the OS on a "test" hard drive.
    >
    > I wish that I could give you more guidance, but I can't get more
    > specific. It can, as I mentioned, be a very difficult problem to fix.
    >
    >
    >
    > Scott Stuart wrote:
    > > Here is a problem that I hope one of you can answer.
    > >
    > > About 2 months ago, my computer started rebooting at random times, as if
    > > someone had pressed the reset button. There is no specific time frame

    for
    > > this problem to occur. Sometimes, the computer will boot up and run for

    a
    > > few minutes, other times it can go for an hour or more. At first, I

    thought
    > > the problem was a faulty reset button, so I disconnected the reset

    button
    > > from the motherboard. This did not help. Next, I replaced the power
    > > supply, thinking that it might be going out. This did nothing to help.

    So
    > > far, I have replaced everything but the CPU chip (AMD Athlon 1.2GHz),

    the
    > > floppy drive, and the CD-RW drive. I thought it might be a line voltage
    > > problem, but there is another computer on the same line, and it never

    has
    > > this problem. I have plugged the computer into another power jack, and

    the
    > > same thing happens. Occasionally, when the computer is off, there is an
    > > audible popping noise that comes from the speakers. This occurs at

    about
    > > the same rate that the computer reboot problem occurs, except that it
    > > happens when the computer is turned off. I disconnected the speakers

    from
    > > the system, and the noise stops. The problem remains in the computer

    when
    > > booted up without the speakers installed. For those of you about to

    state
    > > the obvious, Yes, I have replaced the power cord as well, and this did
    > > nothing to help. Nice try, though..
    > >
    > > Could this problem be due to a failing CPU chip, or am I looking in the
    > > wrong direction?
    > >
    > > PLEASE HELP!!!
    > >
    > > Scott Stuart
    > >
    > >

    >
    hootnholler, Nov 19, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. hootnholler

    Chris E Guest

    This is the first thing I thought about when I read the original post. A
    heat issue. I've run into 2 systems with intermittent rebooting caused by
    an overheated CPU. I would definately check the fan speeds and temps. I
    was surprised it took this long for someone to bring it up.

    Chris
    A+, Net+


    "hootnholler" <> wrote in message
    news:IiDub.61535$-kc.rr.com...
    > Barry has some great info in this post, but one more thing to add... those
    > 1.2 t birds have a tendency to run a bit toasty. If you check all that

    and
    > still issues, check your temps. I usually like to run them about 50 C

    under
    > full load, but they should handle upwards of 60 C. Your motherboard will
    > cause random reboots if the cpu overtemps to the settings... Also, you
    > didn't mention, if this is an asus a7v133 board, check for a bios update

    to
    > the cpu temperature. It was a known problem, and could also be causing

    your
    > issue. As Barry so eloquently pointed out, this could be a real brain

    fry,
    > but you have enough info to keep ya busy for a while :)
    >
    > Hoot
    >
    > "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Almost ANYTHING in the computer can cause this. It can be a difficult
    > > problem to solve.
    > >
    > > You are putting too much emphasis on power and the power supply. That
    > > is not the most common cause. While it is certainly possible, if you
    > > have tried a new power supply (but NOT the same model as the original
    > > one), you have just about totally eliminated the totality of power
    > > problems as a likely cause. Isolation of a computer from power line
    > > problems is almost total with a decent power supply, and not
    > > withstanding what the vendors of surge supressors would have you
    > > believe, it's rare for power line issues to cause a problem with a
    > > computer if the power supply in the computer is "good". I won't go into
    > > exactly why, but in a modern switching power supply there is TREMENDOUS
    > > isolation of the innards of a computer from the AC power mains. I do
    > > believe that every computer should have a UPS because of power FAILURES,
    > > but I NEVER recommend a "surge supressor" .... they just are not
    > > necessary and are a waste of money.
    > >
    > > The most likely cause of this is memory problems, but you say that you
    > > have replaced the memory.
    > >
    > > The next most likely cause is {brace yourself, you won't like this} the
    > > motherboard.
    > >
    > > Yes, a bad CPU can cause this but that is fairly rare. It would be more
    > > common for peripheral card to cause it. Suspect PCI cards first (sound
    > > card, video card, network card, etc.).
    > >
    > > A bad disk drive (or any IDE device) can cause this, it's less common,
    > > but it does happen. If you are overclocking and as a consequence have a
    > > non-standard PCI bus or AGP bus clock rate, that is a common cause.
    > >
    > > In very rare cases, I have seen a USB device, also a PS/2 keyboard
    > > and/or mouse, cause lockups and reboots. The Asus P4T-E, for some
    > > reason, had a notorious history of not working with keyboards made in
    > > the 1990's (really, most keyboards made at any time before about 2001),
    > > and the symptoms, which included both spontaneous lockups and reboots,
    > > did not in any way point to the keyboard. This was a keyboard
    > > controller issue, and may be present in other motherboards as well.
    > >
    > > Software problems can cause this although it's not usually as random as
    > > the problem that you are describing. You could try a fresh install of
    > > the OS on a "test" hard drive.
    > >
    > > I wish that I could give you more guidance, but I can't get more
    > > specific. It can, as I mentioned, be a very difficult problem to fix.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Scott Stuart wrote:
    > > > Here is a problem that I hope one of you can answer.
    > > >
    > > > About 2 months ago, my computer started rebooting at random times, as

    if
    > > > someone had pressed the reset button. There is no specific time frame

    > for
    > > > this problem to occur. Sometimes, the computer will boot up and run

    for
    > a
    > > > few minutes, other times it can go for an hour or more. At first, I

    > thought
    > > > the problem was a faulty reset button, so I disconnected the reset

    > button
    > > > from the motherboard. This did not help. Next, I replaced the power
    > > > supply, thinking that it might be going out. This did nothing to

    help.
    > So
    > > > far, I have replaced everything but the CPU chip (AMD Athlon 1.2GHz),

    > the
    > > > floppy drive, and the CD-RW drive. I thought it might be a line

    voltage
    > > > problem, but there is another computer on the same line, and it never

    > has
    > > > this problem. I have plugged the computer into another power jack,

    and
    > the
    > > > same thing happens. Occasionally, when the computer is off, there is

    an
    > > > audible popping noise that comes from the speakers. This occurs at

    > about
    > > > the same rate that the computer reboot problem occurs, except that it
    > > > happens when the computer is turned off. I disconnected the speakers

    > from
    > > > the system, and the noise stops. The problem remains in the computer

    > when
    > > > booted up without the speakers installed. For those of you about to

    > state
    > > > the obvious, Yes, I have replaced the power cord as well, and this did
    > > > nothing to help. Nice try, though..
    > > >
    > > > Could this problem be due to a failing CPU chip, or am I looking in

    the
    > > > wrong direction?
    > > >
    > > > PLEASE HELP!!!
    > > >
    > > > Scott Stuart
    > > >
    > > >

    > >

    >
    >
    Chris E, Nov 24, 2003
    #2
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