Re: SeaMonkey help, please

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Paul, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > With SeaMonkey version 2.7, the bookmarks column width is too wide
    > for me; my older SeaMonkey 1.1.16 had a decent width.
    > How can one make that more narrow?
    >


    I installed it here (2.7.1), in a Linux VM, and it looks like the bookmark
    column width is auto-sizing. The width is determined by how long
    a text string is used for the entries you make in there. If you
    trim the length of the text in each item, it should become less wide.

    http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/1076/seamonkey.gif

    Similar to other netscape-like browsers, it accepts this kind of URL

    about:config

    That is a dangerous feature, giving access to internal preferences which
    do not appear in any Preference window. First, you'd check Preferences,
    to see if an option exists there, because that has a nice safe interface.
    Next, you'd enter about:config in the URL bar, and it gives a list
    of internal preferences.

    When you work within about:config, there is no "undo"!
    If you make one stinking error, your setting is gone. This is
    particularly important if you "delete" an entry in about:config.
    I did that once, assuming it would be easy to put back. I eventually
    got it back in place, using a similar entry as a template. But it
    wasn't exactly fun.

    The about:config has a "filter" bar, where you type in a filter term
    to restrict the items displayed. I tried bookmark, width, and menu
    as separate filter terms, one at a time, and I couldn't find a
    preference controlling bookmark width. I suppose another term
    might be "auto", so you could give that a try.

    You might want to do some Googling with the term "netscape"
    instead of "seamonkey", as if a control exists, that control
    or method might have existed when Netscape was a live project.

    If you're serious about working within about:config, the easiest
    thing to do, is find the folder where the browser preferences are
    stored, and make a backup copy while the browser is *not* running.
    Then, start the browser, and try your changes. If you foul up
    the settings, then copy back the folder copy you made. It would be
    so much easier if they had an "undo" button in the interface,
    but that would be too easy.

    Good luck,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 11, 2012
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>> With SeaMonkey version 2.7, the bookmarks column width is too wide
    >>> for me; my older SeaMonkey 1.1.16 had a decent width.
    >>> How can one make that more narrow?
    >>>

    >>
    >> I installed it here (2.7.1), in a Linux VM, and it looks like the
    >> bookmark
    >> column width is auto-sizing. The width is determined by how long
    >> a text string is used for the entries you make in there. If you
    >> trim the length of the text in each item, it should become less wide.
    >>
    >> http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/1076/seamonkey.gif
    >>
    >> Similar to other netscape-like browsers, it accepts this kind of URL
    >>
    >> about:config
    >>
    >> That is a dangerous feature, giving access to internal preferences which
    >> do not appear in any Preference window. First, you'd check Preferences,
    >> to see if an option exists there, because that has a nice safe interface.
    >> Next, you'd enter about:config in the URL bar, and it gives a list
    >> of internal preferences.
    >>
    >> When you work within about:config, there is no "undo"!
    >> If you make one stinking error, your setting is gone. This is
    >> particularly important if you "delete" an entry in about:config.
    >> I did that once, assuming it would be easy to put back. I eventually
    >> got it back in place, using a similar entry as a template. But it
    >> wasn't exactly fun.
    >>
    >> The about:config has a "filter" bar, where you type in a filter term
    >> to restrict the items displayed. I tried bookmark, width, and menu
    >> as separate filter terms, one at a time, and I couldn't find a
    >> preference controlling bookmark width. I suppose another term
    >> might be "auto", so you could give that a try.
    >>
    >> You might want to do some Googling with the term "netscape"
    >> instead of "seamonkey", as if a control exists, that control
    >> or method might have existed when Netscape was a live project.
    >>
    >> If you're serious about working within about:config, the easiest
    >> thing to do, is find the folder where the browser preferences are
    >> stored, and make a backup copy while the browser is *not* running.
    >> Then, start the browser, and try your changes. If you foul up
    >> the settings, then copy back the folder copy you made. It would be
    >> so much easier if they had an "undo" button in the interface,
    >> but that would be too easy.
    >>
    >> Good luck,
    >> Paul

    > This so-called autotrim works for what i will call sub-folder columns
    > for the lack of what the actual term might be.
    > What i am talking about is the main / master / root column which is
    > extremely wide; the text is exactly the same as before as everything got
    > transferred (boy, THAT was VERRRy nice).
    >
    > As long as i am asking, there is a lot (for me) of extra junk in the
    > column i do not want, period.
    > In the older Seamonkey, the bookmark was an HTML file that one could
    > edit fairly extensively - and i was able to make the resulting visual
    > aspects desirable.
    > Any hope of trimming out "junk"?
    > *************** OOPS! ****
    > Found spurious added entries at the bottom of the column that did NOT
    > show in the bookmark manager; a bit of fiddling with the main list
    > (visit, right click, select delete) fixed that, and the width is OK.
    > So the "auto width" indeed works.
    > *** end oops ***
    > Still, what about the "junk"?
    >
    > Thanks.


    If there is any junk, it could have been "imported" from the other version.
    I've had problems before, where an upgrade of a mozilla product, puts
    the previous bookmarks in a sub-folder. And each upgrade, adds one to
    the depth of the sub-folder. It really shouldn't do that.

    Junk can also be added by the program itself. The developer might feel,
    "hey, these users should know there is a mozdev.org site" or whatever.
    They add cruft in the menu for you, which you might not want.

    Bookmarks are stored in two formats. HTML is the old (and convenient)
    way of storing bookmarks. The other form, I think is Javascript (.json
    or similar file extension). That isn't quite as easy to work with.

    The "normal user" way of doing this, is the bookmark "Import" and "Export"
    functions (See "Bookmark Manager" and they're under "Tools"). They allow
    exporting the current bookmark list, in the old familiar format. You
    can save the bookmarks in an HTML file by doing that. Now, I've never
    tried editing the list once exported, and then Importing it again. But
    maybe that is one way to change things.

    If you're still having a problem, take a screen snapshot, and post it
    on a site like Imageshack (or some other picture-posting site you like).
    And then we can see what kind of "junk" you're having problems with.
    The imageshack.us site, what I do is delete cookies and change dynamic
    IP address, and then I won't be pestered to "join" or sign up. They
    allow new users to post a picture, so I pretend to be a new user each
    time. When posting pictures of screens, I select "Do Not Resize" from
    the menu of the imageshack.us upload page, so that the text remains
    readable. Then, I view the image on the screen, and take a URL
    of the location of the actual image file, for sharing in a posting.

    This was my Seamonkey bookmark list (tested in Linux, but usually
    they try to make the programs behave the same way under each OS).

    http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/1076/seamonkey.gif

    If you use the Import and Export functions, then maybe you won't
    have to find the Profile folder. On my machine, the profile was under
    mozilla/seamonkey/abcd1234.default/bookmarkbackups . If you look
    for "bookmarkbackups" on your C: drive, you might be able to
    find the Windows equivalent of that path. And then the .json files
    you should not be editing, are down in there. (The abcd1234 thing is
    eight random alphanumerics, and on each install they generate a new
    number.) So if you're looking for interesting files, they'll be just
    above bookmarkbackups. Mozilla likes "SQLite files", a kind of database
    format (non-human readable) for storing history and the like. So much of
    the stored state information, isn't readily available to the user.
    If you get the SQLite3 program though, you can actually "dump" one
    of those databases, if you ever want to look for something.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 11, 2012
    #2
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  3. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>> Paul wrote:
    >>>> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>>> With SeaMonkey version 2.7, the bookmarks column width is too wide
    >>>>> for me; my older SeaMonkey 1.1.16 had a decent width.
    >>>>> How can one make that more narrow?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I installed it here (2.7.1), in a Linux VM, and it looks like the
    >>>> bookmark
    >>>> column width is auto-sizing. The width is determined by how long
    >>>> a text string is used for the entries you make in there. If you
    >>>> trim the length of the text in each item, it should become less wide.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/1076/seamonkey.gif
    >>>>
    >>>> Similar to other netscape-like browsers, it accepts this kind of URL
    >>>>
    >>>> about:config
    >>>>
    >>>> That is a dangerous feature, giving access to internal preferences
    >>>> which
    >>>> do not appear in any Preference window. First, you'd check Preferences,
    >>>> to see if an option exists there, because that has a nice safe
    >>>> interface.
    >>>> Next, you'd enter about:config in the URL bar, and it gives a list
    >>>> of internal preferences.
    >>>>
    >>>> When you work within about:config, there is no "undo"!
    >>>> If you make one stinking error, your setting is gone. This is
    >>>> particularly important if you "delete" an entry in about:config.
    >>>> I did that once, assuming it would be easy to put back. I eventually
    >>>> got it back in place, using a similar entry as a template. But it
    >>>> wasn't exactly fun.
    >>>>
    >>>> The about:config has a "filter" bar, where you type in a filter term
    >>>> to restrict the items displayed. I tried bookmark, width, and menu
    >>>> as separate filter terms, one at a time, and I couldn't find a
    >>>> preference controlling bookmark width. I suppose another term
    >>>> might be "auto", so you could give that a try.
    >>>>
    >>>> You might want to do some Googling with the term "netscape"
    >>>> instead of "seamonkey", as if a control exists, that control
    >>>> or method might have existed when Netscape was a live project.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you're serious about working within about:config, the easiest
    >>>> thing to do, is find the folder where the browser preferences are
    >>>> stored, and make a backup copy while the browser is *not* running.
    >>>> Then, start the browser, and try your changes. If you foul up
    >>>> the settings, then copy back the folder copy you made. It would be
    >>>> so much easier if they had an "undo" button in the interface,
    >>>> but that would be too easy.
    >>>>
    >>>> Good luck,
    >>>> Paul
    >>> This so-called autotrim works for what i will call sub-folder columns
    >>> for the lack of what the actual term might be.
    >>> What i am talking about is the main / master / root column which is
    >>> extremely wide; the text is exactly the same as before as everything
    >>> got transferred (boy, THAT was VERRRy nice).
    >>>
    >>> As long as i am asking, there is a lot (for me) of extra junk in the
    >>> column i do not want, period.
    >>> In the older Seamonkey, the bookmark was an HTML file that one could
    >>> edit fairly extensively - and i was able to make the resulting visual
    >>> aspects desirable.
    >>> Any hope of trimming out "junk"?
    >>> *************** OOPS! ****
    >>> Found spurious added entries at the bottom of the column that did NOT
    >>> show in the bookmark manager; a bit of fiddling with the main list
    >>> (visit, right click, select delete) fixed that, and the width is OK.
    >>> So the "auto width" indeed works.
    >>> *** end oops ***
    >>> Still, what about the "junk"?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.

    >>
    >> If there is any junk, it could have been "imported" from the other
    >> version.
    >> I've had problems before, where an upgrade of a mozilla product, puts
    >> the previous bookmarks in a sub-folder. And each upgrade, adds one to
    >> the depth of the sub-folder. It really shouldn't do that.
    >>
    >> Junk can also be added by the program itself. The developer might feel,
    >> "hey, these users should know there is a mozdev.org site" or whatever.
    >> They add cruft in the menu for you, which you might not want.
    >>
    >> Bookmarks are stored in two formats. HTML is the old (and convenient)
    >> way of storing bookmarks. The other form, I think is Javascript (.json
    >> or similar file extension). That isn't quite as easy to work with.
    >>
    >> The "normal user" way of doing this, is the bookmark "Import" and
    >> "Export"
    >> functions (See "Bookmark Manager" and they're under "Tools"). They allow
    >> exporting the current bookmark list, in the old familiar format. You
    >> can save the bookmarks in an HTML file by doing that. Now, I've never
    >> tried editing the list once exported, and then Importing it again. But
    >> maybe that is one way to change things.
    >>
    >> If you're still having a problem, take a screen snapshot, and post it
    >> on a site like Imageshack (or some other picture-posting site you like).
    >> And then we can see what kind of "junk" you're having problems with.
    >> The imageshack.us site, what I do is delete cookies and change dynamic
    >> IP address, and then I won't be pestered to "join" or sign up. They
    >> allow new users to post a picture, so I pretend to be a new user each
    >> time. When posting pictures of screens, I select "Do Not Resize" from
    >> the menu of the imageshack.us upload page, so that the text remains
    >> readable. Then, I view the image on the screen, and take a URL
    >> of the location of the actual image file, for sharing in a posting.
    >>
    >> This was my Seamonkey bookmark list (tested in Linux, but usually
    >> they try to make the programs behave the same way under each OS).
    >>
    >> http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/1076/seamonkey.gif
    >>
    >> If you use the Import and Export functions, then maybe you won't
    >> have to find the Profile folder. On my machine, the profile was under
    >> mozilla/seamonkey/abcd1234.default/bookmarkbackups . If you look
    >> for "bookmarkbackups" on your C: drive, you might be able to
    >> find the Windows equivalent of that path. And then the .json files
    >> you should not be editing, are down in there. (The abcd1234 thing is
    >> eight random alphanumerics, and on each install they generate a new
    >> number.) So if you're looking for interesting files, they'll be just
    >> above bookmarkbackups. Mozilla likes "SQLite files", a kind of database
    >> format (non-human readable) for storing history and the like. So much of
    >> the stored state information, isn't readily available to the user.
    >> If you get the SQLite3 program though, you can actually "dump" one
    >> of those databases, if you ever want to look for something.
    >>
    >> Paul

    > Well, it seems that with this new SeaMonkey that it is impossible to
    > do a screen capture.
    > I have been using the ParaBen's Screen Capture program with zero
    > problems in numerous other browsers.
    > That uses key combos like Ctrl+Shift+F for Fullscreen, Ctrl+Shift+R
    > for Region, etc; it can be re-programmed for other combos but trying Alt
    > key as part does no good, and a plain F12 does no good either.
    > Looks like ver 2.7 becomes KING; trying to launch ver 1.1 for
    > concurrent operation gives one TWO instances of ver 2.7!
    > So..any ideas how to do a screen capture?
    > PS: export, edit import did help some.
    >


    I use GIMP for editing photos and converting them before upload.

    It has a screen capture option. If I combine the tick box "Full screen capture"
    along with a timer setting of 10 seconds, I can switch apps and pull down a
    menu. Then, capture a picture of that menu exposed.

    http://www.gimp.org/

    It's under File : Acquire. But one thing I notice, is the Linux version
    doesn't have this option, while the Windows version does. Very strange.
    Maybe I'm missing something, but I tried all the menus in the Linux
    version and couldn't find a screen capture option.

    This is a sample screen shot captured with the timer. Windows GIMP
    captures Windows Thunderbird.

    http://img823.imageshack.us/img823/7209/acquire.gif

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 12, 2012
    #3
  4. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:

    > Shut down computer completely (power off reset), re-configured
    > Paraben, and all was well.
    > Look at the two screen captures at http://www.oil4lessllc.org/images/
    > where the filename is the SeaMonkey version.
    > Note the extra junk (2.7.JPG) near the top of the main / root column
    > list as compared to the clean 1.1.16.JPG column list.


    OK, so the delta I see is

    Subscribe To This Page
    Personal Toolbar

    While you can turn the Personal Toolbar on and off, you
    aren't given the option of deleting it from the Bookmark menu.
    Delete is greyed out for that one.

    I notice you have what looks like a few extra separators.
    I wasn't able to figure out how they're controlled.

    Apparently some aspects of that menu can be controlled
    by an optional style sheet (.css). The userChrome.css file
    for example, controls elements of the UI, but again, I
    don't think that's a way to get rid of separators.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20110104130533/http://www.mozilla.org/unix/customizing.html

    I think I'd have to take a week-long course, to use that browser :)

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 12, 2012
    #4
  5. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >> Personal Toolbar

    > OK; how does one control the "Personal Toolbar"?
    >


    View : Show/Hide

    and there is a triangle next to that, that presents
    a sub-menu.

    x Navigation Toolbar
    Personal Toolbar
    Website Navigation Bar
    Tab bar
    x Status Bar
    x Component Bar

    My "Personal Toolbar" is turned off right now, so doesn't clutter
    up the area near where you type in a URL.

    *******

    With some of these issues, you have to download source and
    look for how these things are set up. The last time I did that,
    I ended up looking through 500MB of small files. Loads of fun...

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 13, 2012
    #5
  6. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>> Paul wrote:
    >>>> Personal Toolbar
    >>> OK; how does one control the "Personal Toolbar"?
    >>>

    >>
    >> View : Show/Hide
    >>
    >> and there is a triangle next to that, that presents
    >> a sub-menu.
    >>
    >> x Navigation Toolbar
    >> Personal Toolbar

    > * Makes zero difference
    >
    >> Website Navigation Bar
    >> Tab bar
    >> x Status Bar
    >> x Component Bar

    > * Makes zero difference
    >
    >>
    >> My "Personal Toolbar" is turned off right now, so doesn't clutter
    >> up the area near where you type in a URL.
    >>
    >> *******
    >>
    >> With some of these issues, you have to download source and
    >> look for how these things are set up. The last time I did that,
    >> I ended up looking through 500MB of small files. Loads of fun...
    >>
    >> Paul
    >>
    >>

    > I am tearing my hair out on the so-called bookmarks!
    > You have seen what it looks like.
    > So,i go to a new site i want and bookmark it; does not show ANYWHERE
    > in bookmarks ("pull-down" or "manage").
    >
    > What is worse, is i log in giving username and password (which this
    > version of SeaMonkey does not know), and i tell it to save.
    > Gee, Mister Science, you would think that this would work.
    > To test, i edit preferences clearing out history, location bar,
    > cookies (for the URL) and cache.
    > Then i manually type in the URL, and the spaces for username and
    > password are empty.
    > So, there now is no memory of password..only username (that is to say
    > the box is empty, one types in the first letter and the whole username
    > is presented below for selection).
    > Strange; the older SeaMonkey remembered username AND password with ALL
    > cookies erased; this one wants ALL cookies for a given URL to remember..
    > Also strange is where one has two different accounts to the same site,
    > the older SeaMonkey would pop-up a little box showing a list of
    > usernames, one clicks on what is wanted and Shazam! proper password is
    > used and one is in business.
    >


    OK, try this.

    Bookmarks menu : Manage Bookmarks

    Left hand column has the following (the decorations I included are supposed
    to be triangles).
    _
    v All Bookmarks
    |> Bookmark Toolbar
    |> Bookmark Menu
    Unsorted Bookmarks

    Click "Bookmark Menu", which controls the bookmark menu that pulls down.

    Now, because yours is screwed up, your right hand side won't
    look the same as mine. These are the items on my right-hand side
    when I use Bookmark Menu.

    Recently Bookmarked
    Recent Tags

    <Separator>

    |> SeaMonkey and Mozilla
    |> Search the Web

    <Separator>

    SeaMonkey 2.7.1 Release Notes \___ My actual two
    Yahoo Search - Web Search really really wide... / bookmarks

    The last two, are my real bookmarks, that got added to the end
    of the menu.

    The <Separator> can be edited in here! So the excess separators
    can be removed.

    In this picture, you'll notice that the "Bookmarks Menu" in the Bookmarks Manager
    (on the left of the picture), only controls the lower half of the actual
    bookmarks menu that pulls down. Everything from "Personal Toolbar" on upwards,
    is not affected.

    http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/2906/bookmarksmenu.gif

    As for your bookmarks being missing, do an Export to HTML, then
    see if the item you bookmarked is in there. Perhaps you can
    tell, from reading the HTML, which of the folders it might
    be hiding in.

    The file "places.sqlite" has the bookmark in it. That contains
    the "current" version of the bookmarks. The bookmarkbackups has
    up to five .json files, which are backup copies of the bookmarks.
    Doing the Export to HTML, extracts some of the info from places.sqlite.

    places.sqlite contains many things - on my Linux test install, it
    is around 10 megabytes. Only a tiny portion of that is bookmarks.
    SQLite files are like a giant garbage dump.

    To read it, you need a copy of the sqlite tool. The only time
    I've done this, I discovered I needed a copy of sqlite3. The
    version of sqlite examination program, has to match the version
    of sqlite "boiled" into the browser. (in other words, there is a
    stand alone program available, that allows "doing stuff" to .sqlite files.)

    By using Tools : Add-on Manager, and entering "sqlite" in the search
    box, you can get a plugin for sqlite examination. There was one like
    this for Firefox as well, and I've never used it. )In this case, this
    is a tool that runs within the browser, and allows opening a separate
    ..sqlite file. I made a copy of my places.sqlite to test with.)

    SQLite Manager 0.7.7

    When I looked, there is nothing of value in there. Somewhere in there,
    are the two bookmarks I had at the end of my bookmark menu. But I don't
    see anything in the database that determines the structure of the menu.
    I was hoping by looking in there, I could figure out where your bookmarks went.

    *******

    To make you feel better (i.e. shared misery), I've had one occurrence with
    Firefox in Linux, where Firefox would not remember *anything* . It would
    not record the history of where I went. Doing an "Add Bookmark" would
    not add a bookmark. The cursor would be busy for a moment and then... nothing.
    Virtually any function that requires storing state information was
    busted. I ended up deleting the install itself, as well as the profile
    and starting over again, because I could not figure out why it was
    broken. Permissions looked OK. Perhaps something in About:config was
    broken, but I don't know exactly what. All the other Firefoxes I
    have installed around here (perhaps twenty by now), are all behaving
    themselves.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 14, 2012
    #6
  7. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:

    >> I sure like the consistency - bookmarks now work.
    >> As long as that stays, i will not complain.
    >> Am going to snoop around and see if i can "pretty" up the bookmarks
    >> pull-down column..
    >>

    > Have not tried that, because i found another problem.
    > Not all of the username / password info got transferred, and the one
    > site i found this to be true ...SeaMonkey refused to ask for / save that
    > data.
    > Which one (so far?) https://secure.paperbackswap.com/members/login.php
    >
    > I think i should un-install and try again.
    >


    On the server side, they can hash together browser UserAgent string along
    with the username/password. The cookie stored in your browser, is then
    "browser version dependent". Transferring the cookie to the new browser,
    then won't work.

    It is up to the server in that case, to request your username/password
    again, hash in the new browser UserAgent string, and send back a new cookie,
    "refreshing" the cookie value. On the next attempted login, the "planets
    will all be aligned again". After that, it should log automatically,
    until you either erase the cookie, or change the UserAgent string again.

    If that is how their web server is behaving, you cannot fix that from
    your end. Reinstalling can't fix it. But hacking the UserAgent string
    might fix it.

    The UserAgent string is fetched by web servers, so they can custom produce
    content for the browser. It allows a web site to determine you have a
    tablet or mobile device, and make a different web page than you might see
    from a desktop. But it also gives one more piece of info, they can use
    for consistency checking. If they choose to use the info when generating
    a cookie value for you, the cookie then becomes browser-specific, and the
    cookie cannot be moved from browser to browser.

    I had a site once, which offered free info. You had to register and give
    an email address. Well, eventually, the site stopped accepting such
    registrations, so you could no longer register. I was lucky, in that the
    cookie continued to work for a couple years, and if I carefully moved
    it from browser to browser, it still worked. So if they don't hash in
    the user agent, and just base the cookie purely on account information,
    then it can be successfully transferred.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 17, 2012
    #7
  8. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Re: SeaMonkey help, please - Progress#1

    Robert Baer wrote:
    > Robert Baer wrote:
    >> Paul wrote:
    >>> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> I sure like the consistency - bookmarks now work.
    >>>>> As long as that stays, i will not complain.
    >>>>> Am going to snoop around and see if i can "pretty" up the bookmarks
    >>>>> pull-down column..
    >>>>>
    >>>> Have not tried that, because i found another problem.
    >>>> Not all of the username / password info got transferred, and the one
    >>>> site i found this to be true ...SeaMonkey refused to ask for / save
    >>>> that data.
    >>>> Which one (so far?) https://secure.paperbackswap.com/members/login.php
    >>>>
    >>>> I think i should un-install and try again.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> On the server side, they can hash together browser UserAgent string
    >>> along
    >>> with the username/password. The cookie stored in your browser, is then
    >>> "browser version dependent". Transferring the cookie to the new browser,
    >>> then won't work.
    >>>
    >>> It is up to the server in that case, to request your username/password
    >>> again, hash in the new browser UserAgent string, and send back a new
    >>> cookie,
    >>> "refreshing" the cookie value. On the next attempted login, the "planets
    >>> will all be aligned again". After that, it should log automatically,
    >>> until you either erase the cookie, or change the UserAgent string again.
    >>>
    >>> If that is how their web server is behaving, you cannot fix that from
    >>> your end. Reinstalling can't fix it. But hacking the UserAgent string
    >>> might fix it.
    >>>
    >>> The UserAgent string is fetched by web servers, so they can custom
    >>> produce
    >>> content for the browser. It allows a web site to determine you have a
    >>> tablet or mobile device, and make a different web page than you might
    >>> see
    >>> from a desktop. But it also gives one more piece of info, they can use
    >>> for consistency checking. If they choose to use the info when generating
    >>> a cookie value for you, the cookie then becomes browser-specific, and
    >>> the
    >>> cookie cannot be moved from browser to browser.
    >>>
    >>> I had a site once, which offered free info. You had to register and give
    >>> an email address. Well, eventually, the site stopped accepting such
    >>> registrations, so you could no longer register. I was lucky, in that the
    >>> cookie continued to work for a couple years, and if I carefully moved
    >>> it from browser to browser, it still worked. So if they don't hash in
    >>> the user agent, and just base the cookie purely on account information,
    >>> then it can be successfully transferred.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >> Do not completely understand, but it makes sense.
    >> After a few tries at a given "balky" site, the new SeaMonkey finally
    >> asked to save the name/password.
    >> Even worked for Mouser, two different sets username/password.
    >>

    > OK; what i did was copied the most recent saved bookmark file,
    > bookmarks-2012-02-21.json and wrote a program to parse it.
    > Here is the first part of it to "match" with the posted screen capture
    > "bookmarks.jpg" at http://www.oil4lessllc.org/images/
    > Note looong lines:
    > First 400 characters of saved bookmarks:
    > {"title":"","id":1,"dateAdded":1328852263293000,"lastModified":1329184320707000,"type":"text/x-moz-place-container","root":"placesRoot","children":[{"title":"Bookmarks
    > Menu","id":2,"parent":1,"dateAdded":1328852263293000,"lastModified":1329282064855000,"type":"text/x-moz-place-container","root":"bookmarksMenuFolder","children":[{"title":"","id":959,"parent":2,"dateAdded":1328852264545000,"lastModi
    >
    > --parsed--
    > "title":"","id":1,"dateAdded":1328852263293000,"lastModified":1329184320707000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place-container","root":"placesRoot","children":[{
    > "title":"Bookmarks
    > Menu","id":2,"parent":1,"dateAdded":1328852263293000,"lastModified":1329282064855000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place-container","root":"bookmarksMenuFolder","children":[{
    >
    > "title":"","id":959,"parent":2,"dateAdded":1328852264545000,"lastModified":1328852264545000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place-separator"},{"index":1,
    > "title":"","id":974,"parent":2,"dateAdded":1329018768874000,"lastModified":1329018768874000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place-separator"},{"index":2,
    > "title":"Investing","id":975,"parent":2,"dateAdded":937902842000000,"lastModified":1325127464000000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place-container","children":[{
    > "title":"Login to
    > Fidelity.com","id":976,"parent":975,"dateAdded":1028102865000000,"lastModified":1028102855000000,
    >
    > "type":"text/x-moz-place","uri":"https://scs.fidelity.com/tpv/webxpress.shtml","charset":"UTF-8"},{"index":1,
    >
    > "title":"Fidelity
    > Logout","id":977,"parent":975,"dateAdded":1109267843000000,"lastModified":1221706456000000,
    >
    >
    > **
    > Does any of that "root", "x-moz-place" stuff, "parent", and "children"
    > stuff make any sense at all?
    > And could one using a similar program create a "trimmed" bookmark file?


    I suppose you could trace down, whether there is a standard for .json
    files, and perhaps that standard would explain the reason they
    have a hierarchical relationship.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Json

    "JavaScript Object Notation, is a lightweight text-based open standard designed for
    human-readable [HaHa!] data interchange. It is derived from the JavaScript scripting
    language for representing simple data structures and associative arrays, called objects."

    Otherwise, simply extracting the text portions you want,
    might be as easy a way as any other, of getting to the actual URLs.

    The other thing you'd want to work on, is what the "Import" function does.
    If the Bookmark Manager "Import" will accept a list of raw URLs, without
    any of that other decoration information, then perhaps you have a way to
    get your old bookmarks transferred.

    *******

    This article has a few ideas.

    http://kb.mozillazine.org/Lost_bookmarks

    "To replace your current bookmarks with a bookmark backup file stored
    in JSON format, you should use the "Import and Backup -> Restore" feature
    in the Firefox Bookmarks Manager"

    I found that link, while wandering around in here. Perhaps SeaMonkey
    has that too ? (Restore for JSON, Import for HTML)

    http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=776805&start=30

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 22, 2012
    #8
  9. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Re: SeaMonkey help, please - Progress#1

    Robert Baer wrote:

    > Worth looking at.
    > I think that some slight tweak in the first few items shown by the
    > parser may decrease and hopefully remove that "extra junk" i do not like.
    > *
    > RATS! I hate this "sometimes works, sometimes ignores" password saving
    > "feature".
    > It does not pop up for Fidelity and does not pop up for PayPal (both
    > are https://).
    > Have not checked if this is the case for all https:// tho.
    >
    > Could that be fixed?
    >


    There are 62,741 files in the source (about 445MB).

    Where would you start looking ? Searching the source for "https"
    or "password", returns a massive number of hits.

    I was thinking perhaps some "popup blocker" feature, specific to
    https was involved. I tried looking in the about-config thing,
    but didn't see anything interesting. And not in a preference
    setting either.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Feb 23, 2012
    #9
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