Re: router for Wired Country/IHUG

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by ~misfit~, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Gavin Stephens wrote:
    > "Ripping Silk" <> wrote in message
    > news:cfench$ohf$...
    >>
    >> i just signed up to get myself onto the wireless network through
    >> IHUG. Currently I am on Ultra satellite, using a PC running
    >> 'winproxy' to serve my home network.
    >> With the wireless I would like to use a router to serve the
    >> network, then i can ditch the 'winproxy' box (getting long in the
    >> tooth). I want to be able to specify my own permanent internal IP
    >> addresses (ie 192.168.1.xx) and have it compatible with all the
    >> usual protocols and internet software.
    >> Any suggestions as to makes/models. As far as I am aware I do not
    >> need a modem, ADSL or otherwise.
    >>
    >> thanks..
    >>
    >> Ripping

    >
    >
    > How do they deliver the "superior phone line service" using wireless
    > technology?


    http://www.wiredcountry.co.nz/index.html

    IHUG are the only ones using Wiredcountry to offer a voice-over-ip (or
    whatever it is, you can basically cancel your telecom line and use it for
    all your phone calls and save a lot of money) telephone service at the
    moment.

    > I would find out what the wireless service is to start with, it
    > poberly won't be wi-fi if it's offering time critical services such
    > as phone calls. Proberly a 3G wireless technology with specturm they
    > actually own which means the hardware you'll proberly only be able to
    > get of them directly.


    Around $100 for the install, a dish on your roof and a 10/100Base-T
    jackpoint in your house. (And a 'wall-wart' to power the transciever) The
    rest is up to you. I *think* you need to run it directly to a PC NIC to run
    the software, though I am unsure. A router may do it.
    --
    ~misfit~ (cross-posted to nz.comp for further input)

    > If they supply a box to connect to their network, with a standard
    > 10/100Base-T
    > jack then you can proberly just get a cheap o' dic smith ethernet
    > router. It does PPPoE security and that kind of thing, and does NAT
    > for the other computers so you can use Internal IP's etc... I think
    > the DSE ethernet router is about $90 (no modems no DSL, a no-frills
    > 10/100Base-T router). Check their website.
    >
    >
    > Gavin.
     
    ~misfit~, Aug 12, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>How do they deliver the "superior phone line service" using wireless
    >>technology?


    > http://www.wiredcountry.co.nz/index.html
    > IHUG are the only ones using Wiredcountry to offer a voice-over-ip (or
    > whatever it is, you can basically cancel your telecom line and use it for
    > all your phone calls and save a lot of money) telephone service at the
    > moment.


    errr, wasnt A(sia)OL/Iconz and a few others offering it too?
    sure I read that somewhere.

    --
    Dave Hall
    http://www.dave.net.nz
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Aug 12, 2004
    #2
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  3. "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:%vCSc.12259$...
    > Gavin Stephens wrote:
    > > "Ripping Silk" <> wrote in message
    > > news:cfench$ohf$...
    > >>
    > >> i just signed up to get myself onto the wireless network through
    > >> IHUG. Currently I am on Ultra satellite, using a PC running
    > >> 'winproxy' to serve my home network.
    > >> With the wireless I would like to use a router to serve the
    > >> network, then i can ditch the 'winproxy' box (getting long in the
    > >> tooth). I want to be able to specify my own permanent internal IP
    > >> addresses (ie 192.168.1.xx) and have it compatible with all the
    > >> usual protocols and internet software.
    > >> Any suggestions as to makes/models. As far as I am aware I do not
    > >> need a modem, ADSL or otherwise.
    > >>
    > >> thanks..
    > >>
    > >> Ripping

    > >
    > >
    > > How do they deliver the "superior phone line service" using wireless
    > > technology?

    >
    > http://www.wiredcountry.co.nz/index.html
    >
    > IHUG are the only ones using Wiredcountry to offer a voice-over-ip (or
    > whatever it is, you can basically cancel your telecom line and use it for
    > all your phone calls and save a lot of money) telephone service at the
    > moment.
    >
    > > I would find out what the wireless service is to start with, it
    > > poberly won't be wi-fi if it's offering time critical services such
    > > as phone calls. Proberly a 3G wireless technology with specturm they
    > > actually own which means the hardware you'll proberly only be able to
    > > get of them directly.

    >
    > Around $100 for the install, a dish on your roof and a 10/100Base-T
    > jackpoint in your house. (And a 'wall-wart' to power the transciever) The
    > rest is up to you. I *think* you need to run it directly to a PC NIC to

    run
    > the software, though I am unsure. A router may do it.


    I guess this depends on how they arrange the phone side of things. Does the
    wall socket also have a telephone jack on it aswell for a standard phone? If
    they use something more simple (funny some tech will have proberly made sure
    it's not) like PPPoE for logging on to their network, then an average joe
    router would do it for $90-$128 with a PPPoE dialer in it. Otherwise if it's
    more fancy like MD-5 (similar to that of wi-fi radius based authetication)
    then you would still need a PC to log-on with. That would be a bummer.

    > --
    > ~misfit~ (cross-posted to nz.comp for further input)
    >
    > > If they supply a box to connect to their network, with a standard
    > > 10/100Base-T
    > > jack then you can proberly just get a cheap o' dic smith ethernet
    > > router. It does PPPoE security and that kind of thing, and does NAT
    > > for the other computers so you can use Internal IP's etc... I think
    > > the DSE ethernet router is about $90 (no modems no DSL, a no-frills
    > > 10/100Base-T router). Check their website.
    > >
    > >
    > > Gavin.

    >
    >
     
    Gavin Stephens, Aug 12, 2004
    #3
  4. Gavin Stephens wrote:
    > I guess this depends on how they arrange the phone side of things. Does the
    > wall socket also have a telephone jack on it aswell for a standard phone? If
    > they use something more simple (funny some tech will have proberly made sure
    > it's not) like PPPoE for logging on to their network, then an average joe
    > router would do it for $90-$128 with a PPPoE dialer in it. Otherwise if it's
    > more fancy like MD-5 (similar to that of wi-fi radius based authetication)
    > then you would still need a PC to log-on with. That would be a bummer.


    you get some sort of IP phone, the router gives your phone a real world IP.
    Someone posted it a while ago.

    --
    Dave Hall
    http://www.dave.net.nz
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Aug 12, 2004
    #4
  5. "Dave - Dave.net.nz" <dave@no_spam_here_dave.net.nz> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Gavin Stephens wrote:
    > > I guess this depends on how they arrange the phone side of things. Does

    the
    > > wall socket also have a telephone jack on it aswell for a standard

    phone? If
    > > they use something more simple (funny some tech will have proberly made

    sure
    > > it's not) like PPPoE for logging on to their network, then an average

    joe
    > > router would do it for $90-$128 with a PPPoE dialer in it. Otherwise if

    it's
    > > more fancy like MD-5 (similar to that of wi-fi radius based

    authetication)
    > > then you would still need a PC to log-on with. That would be a bummer.

    >
    > you get some sort of IP phone, the router gives your phone a real world

    IP.
    > Someone posted it a while ago.


    They mention on the website you'll need a router for more PC's. Can't find
    anything else though regarding exactly what the 'piece' of unobtrusive
    broadband equipment is. If they offer their network as a link to other
    ISP's, IHUG may use something simple over their network that most router are
    capable of. IHUG would be the one's to ask rather than wired country in that
    instance, and ask them how does the computer log-on to this service? That
    way you'll know what router might be capable of doing the dial-up process
    for you, or it it is always on, a cheap router will definately do the job.

    Another I found is the linksys BEFS41 which is about $130NZ, which is also
    just a plan ethernet router with NAT, firewall etc...



    >
    > --
    > Dave Hall
    > http://www.dave.net.nz
     
    Gavin Stephens, Aug 12, 2004
    #5
  6. ~misfit~

    Ripping Silk Guest

    OK.. thanks for the replies...
    Maybe I should have rephrased the question...
    I know what the wireless system is, main signal turn on. I'm not
    going to sign up to IHUG phone.. only the internet connection. (for the
    time being).
    The ihug install (which includes an 'adaptor') will plug directly into
    a router... or into a PC. I want to go the router.... er... route.
    I'm more looking for some knowledge on particular routers that may be
    compatible with the wireless setup... although it seems 'any' decent
    router will probably work, that being the case... what are the good ones?
    4 ports would be OK.. as long as I can bridge to another switch.

    cheers.

    Ripping
     
    Ripping Silk, Aug 12, 2004
    #6
  7. ~misfit~

    SteveM Guest

    Ripping Silk <> wrote in news:cff2si$37t$1
    @lust.ihug.co.nz:

    > OK.. thanks for the replies...
    > Maybe I should have rephrased the question...
    > I know what the wireless system is, main signal turn on. I'm not
    > going to sign up to IHUG phone.. only the internet connection. (for the
    > time being).
    > The ihug install (which includes an 'adaptor') will plug directly into
    > a router... or into a PC. I want to go the router.... er... route.
    > I'm more looking for some knowledge on particular routers that may be
    > compatible with the wireless setup... although it seems 'any' decent
    > router will probably work, that being the case... what are the good ones?
    > 4 ports would be OK.. as long as I can bridge to another switch.
    >
    > cheers.
    >
    > Ripping
    >
    >
    >
    >


    I use a Linksys WRT54G 802.11G/Ethernet router so I can use my laptop
    downstairs. Very happy with it. Currently around the $170ish mark.

    SteveM
     
    SteveM, Aug 12, 2004
    #7
  8. ~misfit~

    Ripping Silk Guest


    > I use a Linksys WRT54G 802.11G/Ethernet router so I can use my laptop
    > downstairs. Very happy with it. Currently around the $170ish mark.
    >
    > SteveM



    Ah, was considering going the wireless router, but heard the coverage
    was a little patchy, although your seems to work fine?
    Another consideration, while I do have a laptop its an older one.. and
    has PCMCIA slots... not the 32bit cardbus slots. So if I was to go
    wireless I'd prolly end up with a 802.11b PCMCIA card, not a 802.11g
    card, as I've not seen 'g' cards for PCMCIA.
    So all in all I think I will stay with a wired router.. then I can
    always add access points at a later stage.
    So I had a look at the cheap end at DSE:

    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/411c14bc028cb29a273fc0a87f99071c/Product/View/XH1151


    looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an aversion
    to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured, so much so
    that the online instruction don't even cover static IP setup, only DHCP.

    Ripping
     
    Ripping Silk, Aug 13, 2004
    #8
  9. "Ripping Silk" <> wrote in message
    news:cfh49f$f12$...
    > So I had a look at the cheap end at DSE:
    >
    >

    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/411c14bc028cb29a273fc0a87f99071c
    /Product/View/XH1151
    >
    >
    > looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an aversion
    > to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured, so much so
    > that the online instruction don't even cover static IP setup, only DHCP.


    The DSE unit does static internal IP addressing and the DHCP server can be
    switched off easily enough through it's reasonably detailed web-based
    management system.

    http://www.ascent.co.nz/mn-product-spec.asp?pid=109933 is a Linksys stand
    alone wired-router with NAT also. $128.

    For Wi-Fi, 3com office connect access points are about $200, but have a much
    better range (18dBm=60mW output vs the 15dBm=30mW output most others like
    the linksys, d-link etc have for $160).

    My favourite wi-fi router, the Asus WL-500G is a great toy, USB port for a
    usb drive with FTP server, print server, webcam server and seperate firewall
    for lan, wan and wlan and a ton of security settings. It's quite a detailed
    router for both wi-fi/wired use but comes with a $270 price tag. I'm
    looking at putting a WL-500G with an external antenna and booster at home to
    link an Internet terminal to one of our local cafe's to make a few extra
    bucks and put our little community on the web with a streamign camera etc...
    They also have a dynamic host name update in them if you want to run a
    server using a dynamic Internet IP, a really well thought out all in one
    router:
    http://www.pcalpha.co.nz/product_info.php?cPath=46_50&products_id=432&osCsid
    =737cb178f944f38c5c9b74a60a78cb98

    Gavin.
     
    Gavin Stephens, Aug 13, 2004
    #9
  10. ~misfit~

    theseus Guest

    Ripping Silk wrote:
    >> I use a Linksys WRT54G 802.11G/Ethernet router so I can use my laptop
    >> downstairs. Very happy with it. Currently around the $170ish mark.
    >>
    >> SteveM

    >
    >
    > Ah, was considering going the wireless router, but heard the
    > coverage was a little patchy, although your seems to work fine?
    > Another consideration, while I do have a laptop its an older one..
    > and has PCMCIA slots... not the 32bit cardbus slots. So if I was to go
    > wireless I'd prolly end up with a 802.11b PCMCIA card, not a 802.11g
    > card, as I've not seen 'g' cards for PCMCIA.
    > So all in all I think I will stay with a wired router.. then I can
    > always add access points at a later stage.
    > So I had a look at the cheap end at DSE:
    >
    >

    http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/411c14bc028cb29a273fc0a87f99071c/Product/View/XH1151
    >
    >
    > looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an
    > aversion to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured,
    > so much so that the online instruction don't even cover static IP
    > setup, only DHCP.
    >
    > Ripping


    I have one.
    There isn't any setup required for static IPs, you just set them on the
    clients, within the subnet and outside the dhcp range which is set to
    192.168.1.2-51 by default on mine.
    When I dual boot linux, I sometimes have to reboot the router to clear the
    routing table
    You can also set up static dhcp by mac address.
    The wrt54g mentioned by the other poster has a built in four port switch for
    wired use, and it can be flashed with 3rd party firmware projects that allow
    bandwidth management etc. Its most definitely a superior unit, but the dse
    box is cheap and functional and has a built in usb print server which is
    handy.
    It works as a Unix lpd printer with an address of routerip:lp0. I print to
    it with CUPS, XP services for unix, and the bundled client on the install
    disk.
     
    theseus, Aug 13, 2004
    #10
  11. ~misfit~

    Richard Guest

    Ripping Silk wrote:

    > looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an aversion
    > to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured, so much so
    > that the online instruction don't even cover static IP setup, only DHCP.


    I can see no reason to statically assign IPs, except for the fact that these
    routers will not allow you put static DHCP reservations in them for PCs that you
    want to have services fowarded to. Means that I have to change the IP manually
    on my laptop between locations to have DC++ etc operate
     
    Richard, Aug 13, 2004
    #11
  12. ~misfit~

    theseus Guest

    "Richard" <> wrote in message
    news:411c70c6$...
    > Ripping Silk wrote:
    >
    >> looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an aversion
    >> to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured, so much so
    >> that the online instruction don't even cover static IP setup, only DHCP.

    >
    > I can see no reason to statically assign IPs, except for the fact that
    > these routers will not allow you put static DHCP reservations in them for
    > PCs that you want to have services fowarded to. Means that I have to
    > change the IP manually on my laptop between locations to have DC++ etc
    > operate
    >

    The dse one does allow you to do that with the updated firmware, I can't
    remember if it did with the original
     
    theseus, Aug 13, 2004
    #12
  13. ~misfit~

    Richard Guest

    theseus wrote:

    > The dse one does allow you to do that with the updated firmware, I can't
    > remember if it did with the original


    Ok, well its about time really.

    Since I have put a proper DNS server in here, nothing is staticaly assigned, Its
    nice being able to have the DNS update with the hostnames when things are
    assigned too. Just have to see if theres a way to get the Xbox to get a hostname
    when it requests an IP to tidy things up a bit more.
     
    Richard, Aug 14, 2004
    #13
  14. "Richard" <> wrote in message
    news:411c70c6$...
    > Ripping Silk wrote:
    >
    > > looks like its does the right stuff... but there seems to be an aversion
    > > to using static internal IP's, as DHCP is always favoured, so much so
    > > that the online instruction don't even cover static IP setup, only DHCP.

    >
    > I can see no reason to statically assign IPs, except for the fact that

    these
    > routers will not allow you put static DHCP reservations in them for PCs

    that you
    > want to have services fowarded to. Means that I have to change the IP

    manually
    > on my laptop between locations to have DC++ etc operate
    >

    One advantage of static IP's on a windows machine, is that it boots much
    faster rather than sending a ton of bootp requests before it gives up if the
    DHCP isn't there. I would check the pdf of the DSE unit for the latest
    version and see if there is a MAC to IP address reserve. If the lease on the
    IP is long enough you could still move from point to point maintaining the
    same IP?
     
    Gavin Stephens, Aug 14, 2004
    #14
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