Re: Recent Mozilla/DRM threads - 7 false assumptions posters arehaving

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by Chris Ahlstrom, May 16, 2014.

  1. bleak_fire_ wrote this copyrighted missive and expects royalties:

    > I think many of the posters in the recent Mozilla/DRM threads have made
    > the following false assumptions:
    >
    > 1. Everyone watches only mainstream television and MPAA movies.
    >
    > 2. Everyone buys, rents, listens to, or watches only content with
    > connections to the MAFIAA.
    >
    > 3. Nobody watches independent films or YouTube documentaries.
    >
    > 4. Nobody reads, listens to, or watches independent news.
    >
    > 5. Nobody reads, listens to, or watches material which is not reported by
    > mainstream news (Wikileaks, violence toward humans and animals at Bundy
    > Ranch, cell phone jamming at BART during sexual abuse lawsuit, NSA &
    > Snowden, etc)
    >
    > 6. If #4 and #5 are not true, they should be true, and people should be
    > forced to read/listen/watch only mainstream news, whether through DRM or
    > other means.
    >
    > 7. DRM can somehow be "open" despite it being a criminal offense to
    > discover, investigate, or examine the source code, encryption, or other
    > form of trade secret.


    I didn't see all of that, because most of the fellows stating such stuff are
    reprehensible or repulsive, based on other topics. So I'll take your word
    for it.

    In my case, I don't really care much about having the latest music, so I
    listen to it via streaming radio from sites like sky.fm or somafm.com. Also
    now listen to some playlists from YouTube. If I can't listen to something
    because of "DRM", well, that's just too bad, they won't (in general) get my
    ears or my business.

    Other than that, I pay a buttload a month for DirecTV so I can watch
    international soccer. That, I can do while poking around on my laptop.

    Movies? I don't have the attention span for most movies anymore.

    While I believe an artist's work should be monetized for a reasonable period
    of time (a few years at most), the present copyright regime is completely
    out of control. What is it now, life plus 20 years in the U.S?

    Some courts are even support copyrights for *APIs* (application programming
    interfaces).

    --
    Stone's Law:
    One man's "simple" is another man's "huh?"
     
    Chris Ahlstrom, May 16, 2014
    #1
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  2. On 14-05-15 07:53 PM, Chris Ahlstrom wrote:
    > bleak_fire_ wrote this copyrighted missive and expects royalties:
    >
    >> I think many of the posters in the recent Mozilla/DRM threads have made
    >> the following false assumptions:
    >>
    >> 1. Everyone watches only mainstream television and MPAA movies.
    >>
    >> 2. Everyone buys, rents, listens to, or watches only content with
    >> connections to the MAFIAA.
    >>
    >> 3. Nobody watches independent films or YouTube documentaries.
    >>
    >> 4. Nobody reads, listens to, or watches independent news.
    >>
    >> 5. Nobody reads, listens to, or watches material which is not reported by
    >> mainstream news (Wikileaks, violence toward humans and animals at Bundy
    >> Ranch, cell phone jamming at BART during sexual abuse lawsuit, NSA &
    >> Snowden, etc)
    >>
    >> 6. If #4 and #5 are not true, they should be true, and people should be
    >> forced to read/listen/watch only mainstream news, whether through DRM or
    >> other means.
    >>
    >> 7. DRM can somehow be "open" despite it being a criminal offense to
    >> discover, investigate, or examine the source code, encryption, or other
    >> form of trade secret.

    >
    > I didn't see all of that, because most of the fellows stating such stuff are
    > reprehensible or repulsive, based on other topics. So I'll take your word
    > for it.
    >
    > In my case, I don't really care much about having the latest music, so I
    > listen to it via streaming radio from sites like sky.fm or somafm.com. Also
    > now listen to some playlists from YouTube. If I can't listen to something
    > because of "DRM", well, that's just too bad, they won't (in general) get my
    > ears or my business.


    That's a good position to take to be honest. If they insist on betraying
    us with DRM, we'll insist on ignoring their products. If, however, we
    are very attached to the musician in question, it IS sometimes possible
    to buy music from them directly off of their website, completely
    eliminating the middleman which is often responsible for the DRM in the
    first place. The artists themselves tend to be somewhat more respectful
    of their fans and don't bundle such garbage.

    > Other than that, I pay a buttload a month for DirecTV so I can watch
    > international soccer. That, I can do while poking around on my laptop.


    Same here. I'm mostly a fan of the MLS but I seldom watch the BPL to
    watch Arsenal and Southampton in action (a very Polish team in Arsenal
    and a Polish goalie in Southampton). I'm looking to the Champion's
    League final and hoping to see Atletico take it. I love the underdogs.

    > Movies? I don't have the attention span for most movies anymore.


    I tend to watch TV shows more than movies. I absolutely love Game of
    Thrones and Breaking Bad but also adored Spartacus and was disappointed
    to see it end (even though I knew it would because I know the real
    Spartacus' history quite well). Arrow's pretty good as well as is Turn.
    If I watch movies, it's on Friday with my wife and we tend to ignore
    American comedies because they're ridiculously awful most of the time.

    > While I believe an artist's work should be monetized for a reasonable period
    > of time (a few years at most), the present copyright regime is completely
    > out of control. What is it now, life plus 20 years in the U.S?


    It used to be fifty years as far as I know but I know that the length
    recently increased around the same time as the appearance of the Beatles
    "unreleased songs" album. Essentially, the Beatles material from before
    they struck gold should have been released and made available for free
    but obviously, the music industry needs to suck every last dollar out of us.

    > Some courts are even support copyrights for *APIs* (application programming
    > interfaces).


    Hence why supporting RMS and his mission becomes important. He has very
    reasonable solutions to the problems the world is facing in respect to
    patents and copyright. He sounds like a fruit at first simply because
    we're so used to things being the way they are but when you really
    consider what he's proposing, he's not crazy at all.

    --
    Silver Slimer
    OpenMedia Supporter
    www.silverlips.ca
     
    Silver Slimer, May 16, 2014
    #2
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  3. bleak_fire_ wrote this copyrighted missive and expects royalties:

    > on the great fire of Thu, 15 May 2014 19:53:46 -0400, Chris Ahlstrom leapt
    > from the flames and sang:
    >
    >>
    >> While I believe an artist's work should be monetized for a reasonable
    >> period of time (a few years at most), the present copyright regime is
    >> completely out of control. What is it now, life plus 20 years in the
    >> U.S?
    >>

    >
    > Life+70 for individuals, Publication+95 for businesses


    Well, at least we're now forced to be so creative that we can avoid any
    possibility of being sued <rolls eyes>.

    --
    Men say of women what pleases them; women do with men what pleases them.
    -- DeSegur
     
    Chris Ahlstrom, May 16, 2014
    #3
  4. bleak_fire_ wrote this copyrighted missive and expects royalties:

    > on the great fire of Thu, 15 May 2014 20:06:58 -0400, Silver Slimer leapt
    > from the flames and sang:
    >
    >>
    >>> Some courts are even support copyrights for *APIs* (application
    >>> programming interfaces).

    >>
    >> Hence why supporting RMS and his mission becomes important. He has very
    >> reasonable solutions to the problems the world is facing in respect to
    >> patents and copyright. He sounds like a fruit at first simply because
    >> we're so used to things being the way they are but when you really
    >> consider what he's proposing, he's not crazy at all.

    >
    > I read that about APIs, I can't understand how that would work. Is every
    > programming language other than C outlawed?


    No.

    Just any language "owned" by a wealthy bellicose company like Oracle.

    Why didn't the court take a gander at this?

    http://openjdk.java.net/

    Download and install the open-source JDK 7 for most popular Linux
    distributions. If you came here looking for Oracle JDK 7 product binaries
    for Solaris, Linux, Mac OS X or Windows, which are based largely on the
    same code, you can download them from java.oracle.com.

    --
    Mankind's yearning to engage in sports is older than recorded history,
    dating back to the time millions of years ago, when the first primitive man
    picked up a crude club and a round rock, tossed the rock into the air, and
    whomped the club into the sloping forehead of the first primitive umpire.

    What inner force drove this first athlete? Your guess is as good as
    mine. Better, probably, because you haven't had four beers.
    -- Dave Barry, "Sports is a Drag"
     
    Chris Ahlstrom, May 16, 2014
    #4
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