Re: Question about Nikon lenses

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert Coe, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 13:12:26 +0100, Bruce <> wrote:
    : One last comment. Some older Nikkors, both manual focus and AF,
    : produced superlative results on film but their optics were not
    : optimised for digital sensors and the results may be slightly
    : disappointing. I speak from experience; some of my older Nikkors
    : worked very well but others gave problems with image quality.

    That's a bit vague. I assume you're saying that the lenses that gave problems
    were commendably free of flare, distortion, vignetting, and aberration (or
    they wouldn't have "produced superlative results on film") but weren't
    particularly sharp overall (which could be somewhat harder to notice on film,
    particularly the faster varieties). Does that about sum it up?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 27, 2011
    #1
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  2. Robert Coe

    me Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 20:22:20 +0100, Bruce <>
    wrote:


    >There is no easy way for the average buyer to determine whether an
    >older design of lens will perform well on digital, or not. At this
    >time, there is no definitive listing of which lenses are better suited
    >to digital than others. So there is nothing to stop sellers of some
    >used lenses claiming that they produce excellent results on digital
    >sensors, when they don't. Buyers using eBay, beware!


    How about http://www.naturfotograf.com/lens_surv.html
     
    me, Mar 27, 2011
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  3. Robert Coe

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Bruce
    <> wrote:

    > No, what you stated there is a fallacy that is dearly beloved of
    > digital enthusiasts who believe, despite all the evidence to the
    > contrary, that a typical 12 MP DSLR can record more detail than a 35mm
    > film SLR using good quality film.


    cite the evidence. other than niche films that almost nobody ever used
    which may excel only in raw resolution (and are probably b/w too) a 12
    megapixel camera can *easily* do better than 'good quality' film (which
    you of course neglect to name).

    > This definitely isn't a matter of digital somehow being able to find
    > optical flaws that film could not. Instead, it is mostly about the
    > angle of incidence of light rays as they strike the digital sensor.


    not really. one major issue is the coatings on the *back* of the
    lenses. film is not reflective, sensors are. the back of the lenses
    need coatings to mitigate reflections from the sensor.

    plus, lens design has advanced a *lot* since the days of film. lenses
    are substantially better than they ever were.

    > Film was uniquely tolerant of a wide range of angles of incidence.
    > Light rays striking the film were faithfully recorded at that location
    > no matter which angle they arrived at. So lenses were optimised to
    > give best image quality at the film plane almost regardless of the
    > angle of incidence.
    >
    > Fast forward to today's digital sensors. Their tolerance of rays that
    > strike the sensor at anything that significantly departs from a right
    > angle is poor at best. That's because the microlenses used over each
    > photosite have a limited range of angles of acceptance, whereas film
    > would accept light from almost any angle without problem. For best
    > results, digital demands lenses that are close to telecentric, with
    > all light rays striking the sensor at near-right angles.


    it's not as big of a deal as some might think and offset microlenses
    help too.

    > Lenses that are very close to telecentric, such as the pro grade
    > Olympus Zuiko Digital for Four Thirds DSLRs, and near-telecentric,
    > such as the more recent products of Canon, Nikon etc., give excellent
    > results on both digital and film.


    nikon (and probably canon) had telecentric designs before olympus came
    up with that 'digital lens' nonsense.

    > On the other hand, some pre-digital
    > lenses are far from telecentric. They perform perfectly well on film
    > but suffer all kinds of problems when imaging on digital sensors.


    no, they don't.

    > There is no easy way for the average buyer to determine whether an
    > older design of lens will perform well on digital, or not. At this
    > time, there is no definitive listing of which lenses are better suited
    > to digital than others. So there is nothing to stop sellers of some
    > used lenses claiming that they produce excellent results on digital
    > sensors, when they don't. Buyers using eBay, beware!


    actually it's very easy. look through the lens in both directions and
    see where the aperture blades appear.

    > What is perhaps more worrying is that manufacturers have unsold stocks
    > of lenses built to older designs that don't perform well on digital.
    > They obviously want to sell their old stock, so ... :-(


    they work just fine.
     
    nospam, Mar 27, 2011
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