Re: Question about MS critical updates

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Paul Kersey, Jul 1, 2004.

  1. Paul Kersey

    Paul Kersey Guest

    I agree with Barry.

    What you are describing is like saying you are getting an STD from whacking
    off....highly unlikely.

    BTW, are you using an original of the OS and not a copy or downloaded from
    Kazaa?




    "dogger" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > The last couple times I've formatted and reinstalled Windows it seems I

    get
    > a virus before I get the chance to install any of the updates. I'm

    talking
    > less than five minutes. Usually I install AVG before I setup the internet
    > connection but in the time it takes to say "plug the holes i n windows"

    I'm
    > being hit with a virus or two. Is there any suggestions to get around

    this?
    > does anyone know where i can get the updates and put them on a disk so i
    > can update before going onlne. Any suggestions are welcome.
    >
    > LD
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.677 / Virus Database: 439 - Release Date: 5/4/2004
    >
    >
     
    Paul Kersey, Jul 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. Paul Kersey

    Paul Kersey Guest

    1 year of experience.
    Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the internet.The ISP
    servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.

    User has to surf and/or receive email.

    Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes place....exactly !!


    "ImhoTech" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    > news:eek:TUEc.92946$...
    > > I agree with Barry.

    >
    >
    > Barry was wrong.
    >
    > >
    > > What you are describing is like saying you are getting an STD from

    > whacking
    > > off....highly unlikely.
    > >
    > > BTW, are you using an original of the OS and not a copy or downloaded

    from
    > > Kazaa?
    > >

    >
    > How many years have you been servicing end user pc? How many do you see in
    > an average week with Internet problems?
    >
    >
     
    Paul Kersey, Jul 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Paul Kersey

    TechGeekPro Guest

    On 01 Jul 2004 "ImhoTech" blathered:

    >
    > "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    > news:%1XEc.86697$...
    >> 1 year of experience.
    >> Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    >> however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    >> contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the
    >> internet.The

    > ISP
    >> servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.
    >>
    >> User has to surf and/or receive email.
    >>
    >> Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes
    >> place....exactly

    > !!
    >>
    >>

    >
    > One (apparently limited)year and you're already using the word "can't".
    > Yes, you can. And if you don't patch up XP removing the virus doesn't
    > help, you get it right back.
    >
    > You want to know exactly how it takes place, do your own research. You
    > can start with this one:
    >
    > http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/w32.blaster.worm.
    > html
    >
    > And thats not the only one, its just hard to believe that anyone
    > offering pc service or techsupport hasn't seen this one.


    Well I've been servicing PC's for over a year and I've never seen it
    either.

    --
    TechGeekPro - MCSA, A+, Net+, i-Net+
    "Not only am I certified, I'm certifiable!"
     
    TechGeekPro, Jul 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Paul Kersey

    AG Guest

    "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    news:%1XEc.86697$...
    > 1 year of experience.
    > Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    > however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    > contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the internet.The

    ISP
    > servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.
    >
    > User has to surf and/or receive email.
    >
    > Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes place....exactly

    !!
    >
    >


    It could happen if someone on his network or even a server was infected with
    one of the network viruses that has afflicted Windows XP such as SASSER or a
    variant. I would think that all he has to do is enable the XP firewall and
    he'd keep them out though.

    AG




    > "ImhoTech" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    > > news:eek:TUEc.92946$...
    > > > I agree with Barry.

    > >
    > >
    > > Barry was wrong.
    > >
    > > >
    > > > What you are describing is like saying you are getting an STD from

    > > whacking
    > > > off....highly unlikely.
    > > >
    > > > BTW, are you using an original of the OS and not a copy or downloaded

    > from
    > > > Kazaa?
    > > >

    > >
    > > How many years have you been servicing end user pc? How many do you see

    in
    > > an average week with Internet problems?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    AG, Jul 1, 2004
    #4
  5. "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    news:%1XEc.86697$...
    > 1 year of experience.
    > Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    > however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    > contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the internet.The

    ISP
    > servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.
    >
    > User has to surf and/or receive email.
    >
    > Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes place....exactly

    !!
    >
    >


    You don't know what you're talking about. Virus is probably not the best
    term, but there are certainly "worms" that can infect a system simply by
    connecting to the internet without a firewall or a patched OS. There have
    been many document worms just like this, especially recently. The most
    notable one was probably MSBlaster. Thanks to a buffer overflow exploit, a
    remote user could compromise any system that was not set to completely block
    traffic on the relevant ports (i.e. a firewall).

    I've cleaned enough systems with this virus to know that things like this
    can happen.
     
    Patrick Michael, Jul 2, 2004
    #5
  6. "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Although what you say is true, you have to be "found" and "attacked"
    > before you can become infected. Sure this will happen to a PC that's on
    > for 6-12 hours a day, via a broadband connection with no router or
    > firewall. But it's really hard to imagine it happening to a PC within
    > minutes of being connected to the internet (for the first time), and to
    > have a single user experience that time after time. The story as
    > presented just doesn't seem very likely, although I'm not saying that
    > it's impossible. But another explanation seems more likely.


    All it takes is one computer on the same subnet or even network to be
    infected. I'm sure most of these worms have intelligent "targetting/probing
    code" to first start by sending malicious packets to computers that are on
    the same subnet. This would be fairly trivial with the user's IP and subnet
    mask known to the virus/worm. And at the height of the Blaster worm, it was
    very easy to become infected when so many other computers on the same
    network were infected.

    >
    > In any case, Windows XP Service Pack 2, due in August or September, will
    > turn on the Firewall by default, and will do it before the TCP/IP stack
    > is installed, so that this situation will be impossible on a new
    > installation.


    This is great news. Unfortnately, it's something that should have been done
    a long time ago.
     
    Patrick Michael, Jul 2, 2004
    #6
  7. Paul Kersey

    TechGeekPro Guest

    On Jul 2, 2004 "ImhoTech" blathered:

    > You need to add something like "in your experience" here.


    Why? You never do.

    --
    TechGeekPro - MCSA, A+, Net+, i-Net+
    "Not only am I certified, I'm certifiable!"
     
    TechGeekPro, Jul 2, 2004
    #7
  8. Paul Kersey

    AG Guest

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Although what you say is true, you have to be "found" and "attacked"
    > before you can become infected. Sure this will happen to a PC that's on
    > for 6-12 hours a day, via a broadband connection with no router or
    > firewall. But it's really hard to imagine it happening to a PC within
    > minutes of being connected to the internet (for the first time), and to
    > have a single user experience that time after time. The story as
    > presented just doesn't seem very likely, although I'm not saying that
    > it's impossible. But another explanation seems more likely.
    >
    > In any case, Windows XP Service Pack 2, due in August or September, will
    > turn on the Firewall by default, and will do it before the TCP/IP stack
    > is installed, so that this situation will be impossible on a new
    > installation.
    >
    >
    > Patrick Michael wrote:
    > > "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    > > news:%1XEc.86697$...


    Barry I hate to disagree with you but I work at an ISP. 99.9% of my
    customers are on dial-up and when Blaster came out we had so many customers
    infected with it that we had to sell CDs with the fix tool and the patch on
    them.
    I sold about 200 of those CDs and some people shared them with friends and
    some people brought in their own CD.
    AG

    > >
    > >>1 year of experience.
    > >> Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    > >>however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    > >>contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the internet.The

    > >
    > > ISP
    > >
    > >>servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.
    > >>
    > >>User has to surf and/or receive email.
    > >>
    > >>Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes place....exactly

    > >
    > > !!
    > >
    > >>

    > >
    > > You don't know what you're talking about. Virus is probably not the

    best
    > > term, but there are certainly "worms" that can infect a system simply by
    > > connecting to the internet without a firewall or a patched OS. There

    have
    > > been many document worms just like this, especially recently. The most
    > > notable one was probably MSBlaster. Thanks to a buffer overflow

    exploit, a
    > > remote user could compromise any system that was not set to completely

    block
    > > traffic on the relevant ports (i.e. a firewall).
    > >
    > > I've cleaned enough systems with this virus to know that things like

    this
    > > can happen.
    > >
    > >

    >
     
    AG, Jul 3, 2004
    #8
  9. Paul Kersey

    J Guest

    it IS possible to get a virus/worm just by connecting to the internet...I
    was installing windows, and during the installation, yes, before windows was
    even completely installed (we weren't even close to being finished), it got
    the same virus it got before. the name has eluded me, but yes, it's very
    possible

    JJW
    Net+, CNA for Netware 6

    "Patrick Michael" <> wrote in message
    news:Xd4Fc.30520$Lh.30213@okepread01...
    >
    > "Paul Kersey" <Paul > wrote in message
    > news:%1XEc.86697$...
    > > 1 year of experience.
    > > Internet problems are probably the chief problem with home end users,
    > > however, the problem dogger described is not really possible. You can't
    > > contract viruses simply by establishing a connection to the internet.The

    > ISP
    > > servers would have to be delievering viruses on demand.
    > >
    > > User has to surf and/or receive email.
    > >
    > > Tell me how the problem that dogger is describing takes place....exactly

    > !!
    > >
    > >

    >
    > You don't know what you're talking about. Virus is probably not the best
    > term, but there are certainly "worms" that can infect a system simply by
    > connecting to the internet without a firewall or a patched OS. There have
    > been many document worms just like this, especially recently. The most
    > notable one was probably MSBlaster. Thanks to a buffer overflow exploit,

    a
    > remote user could compromise any system that was not set to completely

    block
    > traffic on the relevant ports (i.e. a firewall).
    >
    > I've cleaned enough systems with this virus to know that things like this
    > can happen.
    >
    >
     
    J, Jul 15, 2004
    #9
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