Re: public access computers..security with xp/2k

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Pikoro, Jul 21, 2003.

  1. Pikoro

    Pikoro Guest

    This issue is very interesting.
    It is true that XP Pro has all these features out of the box but...I stick
    to 2K, maybe a personal preference, I don't like the cartoonesque interface
    of XP, although that is also customizable.
    There are other (better) solutions to those that XP carries:
    1) Deep Freeze for freezing the Registry and any installs.
    2) VNC for remote access.
    3) Other brand name firewalls.

    I prefer a system that will still let me choose, something that Microsoft
    abhorrs...big money makes them insatiably greedy for more money.

    Pikoro

    "Steven Umbach" <> wrote in message
    news:YTmQa.54876$H17.18298@sccrnsc02...
    > XP Pro - without a doubt, no contest. Many more security settings and

    the
    > huge advantage is Software Restriction Policies. Remote Desktop makes
    > managing computers a snap. ICF firewall is a good idea if file and print
    > sharing is not needed amongst computers. --- Steve
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;310791
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/techinfo/administration/restrictionpo
    > licies/default.asp
    >

    http://www.windowsecurity.com/articles/windows_2003_restriction_policies_sec
    > urity.html -- Same as XP has.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Drew" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi Gang:
    > >
    > > I'm getting ready to set up some public access PCs in a local library.
    > > Given the choices of Windows 2K Professional and Windows XP
    > > Professional, is one or the other better as far as implementing the
    > > type of security I'll need for public access computers. For example,
    > > keeping users from uninstalling/installing software, deleting icons,
    > > or other things that shouldn't be allowed with PA computers.
    > >
    > > Thanks in advance!
    > > Drew
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Pikoro, Jul 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. Pikoro

    Pikoro Guest

    Hey Zac,

    Very detailed post as usual, thanks for the link, will check.
    Regarding the enhancements by Microsoft like fast user switching, system
    restore, driver rollback, etc., I find them to be toys, maybe important to
    the mass user, which is what Microsoft targets the most with these
    "upgrades", but I don't use them even though I have them.
    I have a laptop with XP on it, I reformatted it and loaded a clean OS
    without all the commercial crap and still am not convinced about XP.
    I replace system restore, which creates overhead in the system, and driver
    rollback with one simple thing: backup.
    If you backup your system, what are those "utilities" needed for?
    They are for the inexperienced user who never backs up, and downloads and
    installs blindly malware that will screw their systems.
    Regarding the network setup, again, these disks are for people who want the
    quick and simple way without really understanding what is going on in the
    background, I know about the ease of use, the guest account gets you talking
    immediately, but still not convinced that it's worth an upgrade for a user
    with some experience, and I prefer the 3rd. party utilities that I mentioned
    to those bundled in XP. Yeah, Microsoft will finally let you choose, after
    hiding the very existence of this possibility and trying to dissuade you in
    every possible way, after all they have to fend off a lawsuit.
    Regarding 2003, I am overwhelmed at present but some colleagues have tried
    it and played around with it awhile. I will soon "borrow" it from Microsoft
    (sorry, I don't use evaluation copies and I don't really have a guilty
    conscience about that, after all Bill donates a lot of money, let's see some
    of it come my way). I believe what you tell us abouth the huge driver
    database, I had the same feeling when loading a clean XP system on my
    laptop, not a glitch on the install.
    I am also starting study on the 70-210, which I will tackle immediately
    after the Network+.
    BTW, did you learn that MS is ditching XP and they are already working on
    the alpha version of a new OS?
    If you love XP better hurry because it is short-lived, myself I prefer to
    wait and see, I see nothing in XP that I cannot do with 2K, but this might
    be a personal preference because I'm more used to it.
    Best regards,

    Pikoro



    "Zac" <> wrote in message
    news:bsdTa.109061$GL4.28561@rwcrnsc53...
    > Hi Pikoro:
    >
    > You should check out this comparison chart:
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/evaluation/whyupgrade/featurecomp.asp
    > If you read between the propaganda, there are some pretty significant
    > differences, like system restore and driver rollback, etc.
    >
    > I lean towards Pro, as well, but I understand the affinity for 2K. I
    > certainly wouldn't upgrade from 2K Pro to XP Pro, unless there were a
    > special need, but for any new installations I use XP Pro. Microsoft lets
    > you choose, they just don't make it easy. Isn't that why we're learning

    all
    > this stuff? (sorry, I just started my 2K Pro class for the 70-210 exam).
    > My favorite XP feature right now is the network setup utility for setting

    up
    > workgroups. Just pop the disk in each computer (98 or higher) and
    > BAM!...they're talkin' ;-)
    >
    > By the way, have you checked out 2003 yet? I just installed the

    evaluation
    > copy, but I haven't played with it yet. I didn't have to use a single
    > separate driver disk, so the hardware database must be huge. You start

    with
    > a blank desktop, and add what you want from there. Looks and feels
    > professional, so far...
    >
    > Zac
    > A+
     
    Pikoro, Jul 26, 2003
    #2
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  3. Pikoro

    RussS Guest

    Experience speaks
     
    RussS, Jul 28, 2003
    #3
  4. Pikoro

    Zac Guest

    > If you backup your system, what are those "utilities" needed for?
    > They are for the the inexperienced user who never backs up, and
    > downloads and installs blindly malware that will screw their systems.
    > Regarding the network setup, again, these disks are for people who
    > want the quick and simple way without really understanding what is
    > going on in the background,


    Dude, they're called customers. Have fun trying to talk a customer
    through a backup restore on the phone. If you have to restore a backup,
    you're going on site, and your customer has to pay more. Additionally,
    it takes a lot longer. On the other hand, you can walk them through
    system restore, driver rollback, etc., in no time.

    By the way, those 2 items were just the differences between XP Pro and
    2000 Pro that I've gotten some use out of. There are plenty more.

    XP Pro is not responsible for all of the commercial crap you got on your
    laptop, the maker of your laptop is. Clean install is the only way to
    go for any OS.

    On the network setup utility, I don't think you would say that if you've
    used it. Using that utility doesn't prevent you from knowing how to
    setup a small network, just as repeatedly typing in the same information
    on 8 different workstations doesn't enhance your understanding of
    network setup (peer-to-peer workgroup).

    Time is money! These "toys," as you call them, save you time, and your
    customers money.

    TTYL Pikoro

    Zac
    A+
     
    Zac, Aug 1, 2003
    #4
  5. Pikoro

    Pikoro Guest

    Hey Zac,

    OK man, I won't fight with you if you like them.
    Matter of taste, I would never recommend anybody to use them, most of all in
    the light of the recent nasties spread, please read the post on XP and
    security.
    Customers? Oh well, try to talk a customer who has an infected System
    Restore on how to purge it according to Microsoft's guidelines.
    Isn't that a service call?
    Cheers, bro.

    Pikoro



    "Zac" <> wrote in message
    news:0HAWa.30450$cF.10981@rwcrnsc53...
    > > If you backup your system, what are those "utilities" needed for?
    > > They are for the the inexperienced user who never backs up, and
    > > downloads and installs blindly malware that will screw their systems.
    > > Regarding the network setup, again, these disks are for people who
    > > want the quick and simple way without really understanding what is
    > > going on in the background,

    >
    > Dude, they're called customers. Have fun trying to talk a customer
    > through a backup restore on the phone. If you have to restore a backup,
    > you're going on site, and your customer has to pay more. Additionally,
    > it takes a lot longer. On the other hand, you can walk them through
    > system restore, driver rollback, etc., in no time.
    >
    > By the way, those 2 items were just the differences between XP Pro and
    > 2000 Pro that I've gotten some use out of. There are plenty more.
    >
    > XP Pro is not responsible for all of the commercial crap you got on your
    > laptop, the maker of your laptop is. Clean install is the only way to
    > go for any OS.
    >
    > On the network setup utility, I don't think you would say that if you've
    > used it. Using that utility doesn't prevent you from knowing how to
    > setup a small network, just as repeatedly typing in the same information
    > on 8 different workstations doesn't enhance your understanding of
    > network setup (peer-to-peer workgroup).
    >
    > Time is money! These "toys," as you call them, save you time, and your
    > customers money.
    >
    > TTYL Pikoro
    >
    > Zac
    > A+
     
    Pikoro, Aug 21, 2003
    #5
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