Re: Processor Manufacturing Tech

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Paul, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    James D. Andrews wrote:
    > When looking at processors, what is the Manufacturing Tech (measured in
    > nanometers) and how does this factor into selecting a processor and
    > motherboard?


    The geometry in nanometers, is a relative indication of the generation
    of the processor. P4 might have been 90nm or 65nm. Core2 65nm to 45nm.
    Some day soon, there will be 32nm stuff. It is a way of tracking "progress".

    There are too many variables in the design, to make everything peak
    at the same time. Notice that the processor geometry is shrinking, but
    the clock rate isn't increasing without limit. The overclocking
    record is still held by a P4 processor. But the newest processors
    have the most performance, which is all that matters to the customer.
    Performance is what we buy them for.

    A benchmark chart is the most effective means of telling them apart.
    Trying to use their "parameters" to do that, is a waste of time.

    For example, in this chart, a lower execution time, is better. Pick the
    "winning processor", then use the motherboard maker's CPUSupport chart,
    to select a motherboard to go with the winning processor. You could even
    make a plot of "system cost" versus the benchmark times, to give yourself
    an idea of what price premium is being charged to be "the best".

    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2009-desktop-cpu-charts/iTunes-8.1.0.52,1405.html

    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 10, 2009
    #1
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  2. Paul

    sandy58 Guest

    On Nov 10, 9:06 pm, "James D. Andrews" <> wrote:
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:hdcf92$jgd$-september.org...
    >
    >
    >
    > > James D. Andrews wrote:
    > >> When looking at processors, what is the Manufacturing Tech (measured in
    > >> nanometers) and how does this factor into selecting a processor and
    > >> motherboard?

    >
    > > The geometry in nanometers, is a relative indication of the generation
    > > of the processor. P4 might have been 90nm or 65nm. Core2 65nm to 45nm.
    > > Some day soon, there will be 32nm stuff. It is a way of tracking
    > > "progress".

    >
    > > There are too many variables in the design, to make everything peak
    > > at the same time. Notice that the processor geometry is shrinking, but
    > > the clock rate isn't increasing without limit. The overclocking
    > > record is still held by a P4 processor. But the newest processors
    > > have the most performance, which is all that matters to the customer.
    > > Performance is what we buy them for.

    >
    > > A benchmark chart is the most effective means of telling them apart.
    > > Trying to use their "parameters" to do that, is a waste of time.

    >
    > > For example, in this chart, a lower execution time, is better. Pick the
    > > "winning processor", then use the motherboard maker's CPUSupport chart,
    > > to select a motherboard to go with the winning processor. You could even
    > > make a plot of "system cost" versus the benchmark times, to give yourself
    > > an idea of what price premium is being charged to be "the best".

    >
    > >http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2009-desktop-cpu-charts/iTunes-8.1...

    >
    > >    Paul

    >
    > Thanks much.
    >
    > I'm to build a low budget system.
    > I had comparisons of what processors I was interested in and what cheap
    > mobo's supported each, but seeing the Manufacturing Tech (nm) listed, I was
    > concerned if this was an additional factor for pairing the CPU/Mobo for
    > basic construction I needed to worry about.
    >
    > From your link and OF's, I now have a basic grasp.
    >
    > And from Sandy's comments, I see that it is just one more tech spec for
    > building "ultimate systems" but as long as my mobo supports my processor, I
    > needn't worry.
    >
    > thanks Paul, OF, Sandy.
    >
    > We now return to our regularly scheduled program.


    There you are, James. Paul's reply is comprehensibly as good an
    explanation as I have seen. Even I can understand it. Thanks, James
    for bringing up a new techie side to cpu's & thanks, Paul for your
    explanation.
     
    sandy58, Nov 11, 2009
    #2
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