Re: Privacy/Security: How to change my IP address daily or weekly on DSL

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Aluxe, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. Aluxe

    Aluxe Guest

    I think I found one place where the router isn't acting as documented.
    If I read page 74 of the WRT54G owners manual correctly
    ( http://media-server.amazon.com/media/mole/MANUAL000000300.pdf ),
    the "Connection" should be reported as "Disconnected" in the morning aft
    the modem has been powered down for a long period of time (hours).

    But, I remember testing this out intuitively and the router clearly said it
    was "connected" when it was certainly not connected. Even the OLD IP
    ADDRESS showed up on this router page when I checked yesterday and this
    morning. In a way, it seems that the router is confused as it "thinks" it's
    connected and it "thinks" it has an IP address ... but it is neither
    connected nor does it have an IP address.

    Of course, rebooting the router clears all this confusion up ... but, I had
    tried hitting the "disconnect" and then "reconnect" button on the router
    web page but it didn't work this morning when I tested it.

    Here, specifically, is what "troubleshooting" page 74 of the Linksys WRT54G
    owners manual says about this:

    14. My DSL serviceÿs PPPoE is always disconnecting.
    PPPoE is not actually a dedicated or always-on connection. The DSL ISP can
    disconnect the service after a period of inactivity, just like a normal
    phone dialup connection to the Internet. There is a setup option to ´keep
    alive¡ the connection. This may not always work, so you may need to
    re-establish connection periodically.
    A. To connect to the Router, go to the web browser,
    and enter http://192.168.1.1 or the IP address of the Router.
    B. Enter the password, if asked.
    C. On the Setup screen, select the option Keep Alive, and set the Redial
    Period option at 20 (seconds).
    D. Click the Apply button.
    E. Click the Status tab, and click the Connect button.
    F. You may see the login status display as Connecting. Press the F5 key to
    refresh the screen, until you see the login status display as Connected.
    G. Click the Apply button to continue.
    If the connection is lost again, follow steps E to G to re-establish
    connection.

    If I interpret this troubleshooting help correctly, after I've powered down
    my modem overnight, in the morning the router should not be listing the old
    IP address as "connected". The router should be listing no ip address and
    it should indicate it's "disconnected".

    Yes?
    Aluxe, Oct 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. Aluxe

    Dana Guest

    "Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I think I found one place where the router isn't acting as documented.
    > If I read page 74 of the WRT54G owners manual correctly
    > ( http://media-server.amazon.com/media/mole/MANUAL000000300.pdf ),
    > the "Connection" should be reported as "Disconnected" in the morning aft
    > the modem has been powered down for a long period of time (hours).
    >
    > But, I remember testing this out intuitively and the router clearly said

    it
    > was "connected" when it was certainly not connected. Even the OLD IP
    > ADDRESS showed up on this router page when I checked yesterday and this
    > morning. In a way, it seems that the router is confused as it "thinks"

    it's
    > connected and it "thinks" it has an IP address ... but it is neither
    > connected nor does it have an IP address.
    >
    > Of course, rebooting the router clears all this confusion up ... but, I

    had
    > tried hitting the "disconnect" and then "reconnect" button on the router
    > web page but it didn't work this morning when I tested it.
    >
    > Here, specifically, is what "troubleshooting" page 74 of the Linksys

    WRT54G
    > owners manual says about this:
    >
    > 14. My DSL serviceÿs PPPoE is always disconnecting.
    > PPPoE is not actually a dedicated or always-on connection. The DSL ISP can
    > disconnect the service after a period of inactivity, just like a normal
    > phone dialup connection to the Internet. There is a setup option to ´keep
    > alive¡ the connection. This may not always work, so you may need to
    > re-establish connection periodically.
    > A. To connect to the Router, go to the web browser,
    > and enter http://192.168.1.1 or the IP address of the Router.
    > B. Enter the password, if asked.
    > C. On the Setup screen, select the option Keep Alive, and set the Redial
    > Period option at 20 (seconds).
    > D. Click the Apply button.
    > E. Click the Status tab, and click the Connect button.
    > F. You may see the login status display as Connecting. Press the F5 key to
    > refresh the screen, until you see the login status display as Connected.
    > G. Click the Apply button to continue.
    > If the connection is lost again, follow steps E to G to re-establish
    > connection.
    >
    > If I interpret this troubleshooting help correctly, after I've powered

    down
    > my modem overnight, in the morning the router should not be listing the

    old
    > IP address as "connected". The router should be listing no ip address and
    > it should indicate it's "disconnected".
    >
    > Yes?


    Yes. But did you not select the always on option during some of your
    attempts to have your IP change. That may be telling the router to think it
    is connected when it is not.
    Dana, Oct 21, 2006
    #2
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  3. Aluxe

    Aluxe Guest

    On Sat, 21 Oct 2006 13:17:41 -0800, Dana wrote:
    >> If I interpret this troubleshooting help correctly,
    >> after I've powered down my modem overnight, in the morning
    >> the router should not be listing the old IP address as "connected".
    >> The router should be listing no ip address and it should indicate '
    >> it's "disconnected".


    > Yes. But did you not select the always on option during some of your
    > attempts to have your IP change. That may be telling the router to think it
    > is connected when it is not.


    I think this is the fundamental router problem (most likely a bug).
    I think the router "thinks" it is connected when, in fact, it hasn't been
    connected for (at least 4) hours because the modem has been powered off.
    Because the router "thinks" it's connected, it sees no need to connect
    again to obtain a different IP address, even if I wait for an hour or more
    after powering up the modem. This would seem, to me, to be a router bug.

    The option I was using earlier in the time span of this thread was:
    Keep Alive: Redial Period = 30 sec

    But, for the past few days, I followed the suggestion to set:
    Connect on Demand: Max Idle Time = 5 min

    I'm assuming that a "demand" is an Opera browser request to
    "www.google.com" or the "ipconfig /relase" + "ipconfig /renew" sequence or
    a "ping www.google.com", etc.

    QUESTION FOR FIREWALL USERS:
    If you power down your modem long enough for your ISP to relinquish your
    DHCP IP address, when you power up your modem in the morning, does your
    router fail to connect back to the ISP?

    I suspect this inability to connect is a bona-fide bug in the Linksys
    WRT54G router. It would be interesting to see if other routers have the
    same bug.
    Aluxe, Oct 22, 2006
    #3
  4. Aluxe

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:1ggncgkjaybmq.1ctd1onoxs7ne$...
    > On Sat, 21 Oct 2006 13:17:41 -0800, Dana wrote:
    >>> If I interpret this troubleshooting help correctly,
    >>> after I've powered down my modem overnight, in the morning
    >>> the router should not be listing the old IP address as "connected".
    >>> The router should be listing no ip address and it should indicate '
    >>> it's "disconnected".

    >
    >> Yes. But did you not select the always on option during some of your
    >> attempts to have your IP change. That may be telling the router to think
    >> it
    >> is connected when it is not.

    >
    > I think this is the fundamental router problem (most likely a bug).
    > I think the router "thinks" it is connected when, in fact, it hasn't been
    > connected for (at least 4) hours because the modem has been powered off.
    > Because the router "thinks" it's connected, it sees no need to connect
    > again to obtain a different IP address, even if I wait for an hour or more
    > after powering up the modem. This would seem, to me, to be a router bug.


    You flat-out don't know what you are talking about here.

    >
    > The option I was using earlier in the time span of this thread was:
    > Keep Alive: Redial Period = 30 sec
    >
    > But, for the past few days, I followed the suggestion to set:
    > Connect on Demand: Max Idle Time = 5 min
    >
    > I'm assuming that a "demand" is an Opera browser request to
    > "www.google.com" or the "ipconfig /relase" + "ipconfig /renew" sequence or
    > a "ping www.google.com", etc.
    >
    > QUESTION FOR FIREWALL USERS:
    > If you power down your modem long enough for your ISP to relinquish your
    > DHCP IP address, when you power up your modem in the morning, does your
    > router fail to connect back to the ISP?


    No

    It's most likely that the IP is assigned to the modem's MAC and is
    provisioned to your account with the ISP. You can try, try and try some
    more to change the IP, that you cannot do. I don't know about the ISP you
    are using, but if that IP from the ISP is provisioned to the modem's MAC and
    is linked to your account with the ISP, that IP is NOT changing, unless you
    call them to have the ISP change it or you don't pay the bill and leave it
    cut off for awhile and then and only then based on the two conditions will
    that IP be changed.

    >
    > I suspect this inability to connect is a bona-fide bug in the Linksys
    > WRT54G router. It would be interesting to see if other routers have the
    > same bug.


    Again, you flat-out don't know what you're talking about.

    You can lead a horse to water, but I guess in some cases, the horse has to
    be clubbed and kicked *head* to make the horse drink. <g>

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Oct 22, 2006
    #4
  5. Aluxe

    Aluxe Guest

    On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 12:38:50 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    >> I think this is the fundamental router problem (most likely a bug).
    >> I think the router "thinks" it is connected when, in fact, it hasn't been
    >> connected for (at least 4) hours because the modem has been powered off.

    > You flat-out don't know what you are talking about here.


    Hi Duane,
    I never said I did. That's why I ask you experts for help so that once the
    ISP gives up on an IP address, that the router would then dial in asking
    for a new one (without resorting to rebooting the router).


    > It's most likely that the IP is assigned to the modem's MAC and is
    > provisioned to your account with the ISP. You can try, try and try some
    > more to change the IP, that you cannot do.


    Hi Duane,
    I'm wondering if you understand what I said? I get a new IP address any
    time I want. All I have to do is wait about 4 hours with the modem turned
    off and reboot the router after I turn on the modem. So, why do you say I
    can't CHANGE the IP address? Am I misunderstanding you or are you
    misundertanding me? Please clarify.

    > I don't know about the ISP you are using, but if that IP from the
    > ISP is provisioned to the modem's MAC and is linked to your account
    > with the ISP, that IP is NOT changing, unless you call them to have
    > the ISP change it or you don't pay the bill and leave it
    > cut off for awhile and then and only then based on the two
    > conditions will that IP be changed.


    Hi Duane,
    Again, I fail to understand you or you fail to understand me.
    With DHCP you get a different IP address every time I leave the modem off
    overnight and reboot both the modem and router in the morning. So, why do
    you insist on saying I have to not pay my bill in order to get a new IP
    address. Again, am I misunderstanding you or are you misunderstanding me.
    Please clarify.

    >> I suspect this inability to connect is a bona-fide bug in the Linksys
    >> WRT54G router. It would be interesting to see if other routers have the
    >> same bug.

    > Again, you flat-out don't know what you're talking about.
    > You can lead a horse to water, but I guess in some cases, the horse has to
    > be clubbed and kicked *head* to make the horse drink.


    Hi Duane,
    If I understand you correctly (and you'll need to clarify if I don't), you
    say I can't change my IP address (assuming I pay my bill). But, I can
    easily change my IP address. I do it almost every day (see explanations in
    this thread ... there are probably fifty of them saying so). Everyone else
    understood me ... but you ... or ... am I misunderstanding you? Please
    clarify.
    Aluxe, Oct 22, 2006
    #5
  6. Aluxe

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:4bxcy60rdx22.e0k5aeaoaq63$...
    > On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 12:38:50 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    >>> I think this is the fundamental router problem (most likely a bug).
    >>> I think the router "thinks" it is connected when, in fact, it hasn't
    >>> been
    >>> connected for (at least 4) hours because the modem has been powered off.

    >> You flat-out don't know what you are talking about here.

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    > I never said I did. That's why I ask you experts for help so that once the
    > ISP gives up on an IP address, that the router would then dial in asking
    > for a new one (without resorting to rebooting the router).
    >
    >
    >> It's most likely that the IP is assigned to the modem's MAC and is
    >> provisioned to your account with the ISP. You can try, try and try some
    >> more to change the IP, that you cannot do.

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    > I'm wondering if you understand what I said? I get a new IP address any
    > time I want. All I have to do is wait about 4 hours with the modem turned
    > off and reboot the router after I turn on the modem. So, why do you say I
    > can't CHANGE the IP address? Am I misunderstanding you or are you
    > misundertanding me? Please clarify.
    >
    >> I don't know about the ISP you are using, but if that IP from the
    >> ISP is provisioned to the modem's MAC and is linked to your account
    >> with the ISP, that IP is NOT changing, unless you call them to have
    >> the ISP change it or you don't pay the bill and leave it
    >> cut off for awhile and then and only then based on the two
    >> conditions will that IP be changed.

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    > Again, I fail to understand you or you fail to understand me.
    > With DHCP you get a different IP address every time I leave the modem off
    > overnight and reboot both the modem and router in the morning. So, why do
    > you insist on saying I have to not pay my bill in order to get a new IP
    > address. Again, am I misunderstanding you or are you misunderstanding me.
    > Please clarify.
    >


    I am not reading this whole thread - every posts, and I am not reading every
    post you have made in all of this. Like I said, IF the IP is provisioned to
    your modem's MAC and to the MAC of the first device behind the modem such as
    a router with both linked to an ISP account like my ISP did, then that IP is
    not changing. If that's not the case, then that is not the case.


    T54G router. It would be interesting to see if other routers have the
    >>> same bug.

    >> Again, you flat-out don't know what you're talking about.
    >> You can lead a horse to water, but I guess in some cases, the horse has
    >> to
    >> be clubbed and kicked *head* to make the horse drink.


    And I'll bet money that the 54G doesn't have a bug.

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    > If I understand you correctly (and you'll need to clarify if I don't), you
    > say I can't change my IP address (assuming I pay my bill). But, I can
    > easily change my IP address. I do it almost every day (see explanations in
    > this thread ... there are probably fifty of them saying so). Everyone else
    > understood me ... but you ... or ... am I misunderstanding you? Please
    > clarify.


    Some IP's don't allow this, and maybe, it's that you don't have a
    broadband connection. Like I said, I am not reading this entire thread
    with everything being posted. A person would have to be insane to do it, but
    there are those that will do just that.

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Oct 22, 2006
    #6
  7. Aluxe

    Yohann Guest

    "Duane Arnold" <Yeah-Don't-bother-@that's-right.BET> wrote in
    news:uDJ_g.13318$:


    >
    > Again, you flat-out don't know what you're talking about.
    >


    Duane: Watch your language or I'll have to bitch-slap you from one end of
    the Net to the other.

    Yo!
    Yohann, Oct 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Aluxe

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "Yohann" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9864AFB66FD48yoyass@69.28.186.158...
    > "Duane Arnold" <Yeah-Don't-bother-@that's-right.BET> wrote in
    > news:uDJ_g.13318$:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Again, you flat-out don't know what you're talking about.
    >>

    >
    > Duane: Watch your language or I'll have to bitch-slap you from one end of
    > the Net to the other.
    >
    > Yo!


    You should have bitch-slapped your crazy ass mama from one end of the that
    nasty alley to the other end of it, where your crazy ass was born, for
    having you, that's where some bitch-slapping belongs.

    Yo-howl, your crazy ass back to the alley and find her, don't blame me.
    Duane Arnold, Oct 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Aluxe

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <qiQ_g.10949$>,
    "Duane Arnold" <Yeah-Don't-bother-@that's-right.BET> wrote:

    > Some IP's don't allow this, and maybe, it's that you don't have a
    > broadband connection. Like I said, I am not reading this entire thread
    > with everything being posted. A person would have to be insane to do it, but
    > there are those that will do just that.


    She's connecting to her IPS via PPPoE, which is kind of broadband
    dialup, like PPP (in fact, if you connect from Linux, you can use the
    same scripts). The ISP hands out IP addresses dynamically. Mostly, if
    the ISP is big enough, you can get a different address just by
    disconnecting and reconnecting (just keep doing it 'til you're happy
    with the address you get). A smaller ISP will have a more limited range
    of addresses to hand out. Aluxe is with Pacific Bell, it looks like, and
    I would think that they're a pretty big company.

    Her router hands out IP addresses (in the "private" range) to her LAN
    computer(s) via DHCP. That's the only place that DHCP comes into this
    picture.

    It's not that she doesn't know what she's talking about, it's that she's
    a trifle confused and very obsessed with a non-issue. There's no way you
    can be anonymous without using the anonymous tools out there. Also, her
    writing style is so distinct, it wouldn't matter if she posted as Fred
    Bezak from Cotse or Altopia: eventually, someone would recognize her.
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: Like what?
    Teal'c: I am unsure, he is concealing it.
    Warren Oates, Oct 23, 2006
    #9
  10. Aluxe

    Aluxe Guest

    On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 08:44:56 -0400, Warren Oates wrote:
    > It's not that she doesn't know what she's talking about, it's that she's
    > a trifle confused and very obsessed with a non-issue.


    Hi Warren Oates,

    Again, thank you for your kind response. The question is posed to a group
    of experts on routers and firewalls how to get a firewalled router to
    connect to a PPPoE ISP after a well defined circumstance occurs - namely,
    the modem is turned on after a 4-hour period where it was off.

    If that question sounds "confused" to you, then it must be confusing to
    others (perhaps that's why there is so much traffic on this one thread) so
    I will restate the question specifically below.

    QUESTION TO FIREWALL ROUTER NETWORK EXPERTS ONLY:
    - Given PPPoE and WinXP and the Linksys WRT54G router ...
    - If you turn off the modem to Pacific Bell for four hours ...
    - Which always results in the ISP dropping the assigned IP address ...
    - Wouldn't you expect the Linksys router to reconnect to the ISP on demand?
    Aluxe, Oct 23, 2006
    #10
  11. Aluxe <> writes:
    > QUESTION TO FIREWALL ROUTER NETWORK EXPERTS ONLY:
    > - Given PPPoE and WinXP and the Linksys WRT54G router ...
    > - If you turn off the modem to Pacific Bell for four hours ...
    > - Which always results in the ISP dropping the assigned IP address ...
    > - Wouldn't you expect the Linksys router to reconnect to the ISP on demand?

    and also:
    > I have no idea whether my WinXP SP2 OS or its applications are generating
    > any traffic during the day when I am not using it. I turned off all the
    > things I "think" are generating traffic and I have a software firewall
    > which was long ago set up to prevent outside access from programs such as
    > real player, adobe acrobat, etc. which constantly "phone home".
    >
    > But, is there an easy test to PROVE that no traffic has been generated for
    > the past, say, fifteen minutes?


    First, let me prefix this response with the fact that I don't
    currently use PPPoE (although I did over 5 years ago and even then I
    used it from Linux not XP), so I can't talk specifically about that.
    My current set up is a cable modem and not DSL, another difference.
    Moreover, every ISP does things just a bit differently than others,
    even within an ISP you can get local variations, my Comcast service in
    Hopkintom MA worked differently than my Comcast service in Marlboro,
    and differently again than Charter in Berlin, so even if I were using
    DSL (and it wold be Verizon DSL), my answers might not help you.

    The WRT54G is a "venerable" router. It is unlikely that it has a bug
    that is causing the problem. I think it is reasonable to expect that
    there is a configuration setting on the WRT54G that tell it to
    hang-up/re-connect after inactivity and that using that should get
    your router to disconnect.

    Now, as I recall, you said if you power off the router (and not the
    modem) you can get a new IP address. That suggests that it is the
    router and not the modem, which is key in getting a new IP. Thus, if
    you are not getting a new IP, your router is probably not
    disconnecting.

    Next, a software firewall does not prevent traffic from going out. If
    it did, you couldn't surf the web at all. A software (or hardware)
    firewall only prevents traffic from coming into your computer from
    "sessions/flows" you didn't initiate. Those are networking specific
    terms (and I am not a networking expert, although I do work vaguely in
    that area at the moment). Essentially, when you make a web request,
    you start a session with the remote host, and that host can send you
    back information as part of the same session and those responses will
    get through your firewall. However, if your local computer doesn't
    start a session (or if the remote computer sends you information that
    it doesn't mark as part of the session your computer initiated), the
    firewall will not pass the information (packet) on to your computer.
    some firewalls, [also] do other things, but for your question, the
    firewall probably is performing that function.

    Thus, if you have software on your machine the desires to "phone
    home". Your firewall won't block that traffic. The firewall can't
    distinguish between traffic that your computer generates because you
    want it to, and traffic your computer generates because some program
    wants to "phone home" even though you don't want it to--there is no
    "intent" field in the traffic, where the request says do this because
    the user typed on the keyboard, v. do this because Adobe reader wants
    me to. Now, sometimes, you can prevent such traffic by "blocking
    specific ports". However, it is also possible that the "phone home"
    traffic can be indistinguishable from your normal/useful web traffic
    (e.g. using port 80 where your web traffic normally flows and which
    you don't want to block).

    There are simple devices (programs) called "packet sniffers" that can
    tell you what traffic is being generated by your computer. I don't
    know if there are any packet sniffers that run on XP and will tell you
    if the XP machine itself is generating traffic. Generally, the packet
    sniffers I know about are a separate computer you add to the mix that
    watch for traffic. That doesn't mean there isn't a solution that does
    exactly what you want (in terms of proving there is no traffic).

    Now, if you were "REALLY" motivated to find a solution to this problem
    (I'm not impugning your motivation, you are most tenacious, but you
    aren't (and shouldn't be) willing to spend say $300 to buy a solution
    that also might require you to learn Linux and networking and ...,
    which would be the mark of "REALLY" motivated--e.g. because it was
    your job to fix this problem for a company that was losing money
    because of this hole. Spending $300 to fix this problem in your shoes
    would not be the mark of the motivated, but of the paranoid)....

    Again, if you had that level of motivation, you could buy a cheap
    Linux computer with two network cards in it, and use the ipfilter
    software to build a sniffer and more importantly to drop the packets
    which was keeping the port active.

    Now, there may be cheaper solutions. They may run on XP. I just don't
    happen to know what they are. You might try googling for "packet
    sniffer" and see what you come up with. It's a lead and you can
    follow it to see if it gets you closer to the solution you want.

    Note some routers will provide "traffic reports". However, I don't
    know if the WRT54G, begin marketed for "home use" provides such level
    of sophistication. However, if I understand right, the WRT54G is
    actually a popular router that many people have "hacked" and thus, for
    which, these is downloadable software that changes how it works. You
    could try googling for that too.

    I myself would be looking for "mail to news gateways". With those you
    can probably camoflague your posting address without hiding your local
    computer's IP at all.

    BTW, one simple (and cheap) way to test if it is your computer
    generating the traffic, is to leave the modem (and router) on and turn
    the computer off. If the router doesn't disconnect after your doing
    that for an appropriately long period (your 15 mins), then you
    probably don't have the router's settings right yet. If turning your
    computer off makes the router disconnect, then it is probably computer
    generated traffic (or the router sensing the ethernet card in your
    computer). If turning the computer off makes the modem disconnect,
    you can see if it is the ethernet card by putting a password on your
    computer so that you have to login, and restarting your computer, but
    not logging in. That will leave your ethernet card on, but because
    you haven't logged in, no programs should be running on your machine
    generating traffic.

    Hope this helps,
    -Chris

    *****************************************************************************
    Chris Clark Internet :
    Compiler Resources, Inc. Web Site : http://world.std.com/~compres
    23 Bailey Rd voice : (508) 435-5016
    Berlin, MA 01503 USA fax : (978) 838-0263 (24 hours)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Chris F Clark, Oct 23, 2006
    #11
  12. "Chris F Clark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Aluxe <> writes:
    >
    > BTW, one simple (and cheap) way to test if it is your computer
    > generating the traffic, is to leave the modem (and router) on and turn
    > the computer off. If the router doesn't disconnect after your doing
    > that for an appropriately long period (your 15 mins), then you
    > probably don't have the router's settings right yet. If turning your
    > computer off makes the router disconnect, then it is probably computer
    > generated traffic (or the router sensing the ethernet card in your
    > computer). If turning the computer off makes the modem disconnect,
    > you can see if it is the ethernet card by putting a password on your
    > computer so that you have to login, and restarting your computer, but
    > not logging in. That will leave your ethernet card on, but because
    > you haven't logged in, no programs should be running on your machine
    > generating traffic.
    >
    > Hope this helps,
    > -Chris


    There is another possibility here.
    Some years ago I had a significant problem with the modem/router pair being
    quite active when the computer was not in use. This was in win98 days,
    before all the 'phone home' concerns.
    It ended up that a few of the web sites I had visited kept sending whatever
    they needed to, to keep the connection open. Apparently this was done to
    enable faster access to their content (ads?) if I re-opened IE or Netscape
    You may wish to examine your incoming/outgoing traffic from the router and
    compare that to what is reported by the computer.
    If you modem or router is receiving packets, you will not get a period of
    inactivity when your computer is shut down.

    Stuart
    Stuart Miller, Oct 23, 2006
    #12
  13. "Stuart Miller" <> writes:

    > "Chris F Clark" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Aluxe <> writes:
    >>
    >> BTW, one simple (and cheap) way to test if it is your computer
    >> generating the traffic, is to leave the modem (and router) on and turn
    >> the computer off. If the router doesn't disconnect after your doing
    >> that for an appropriately long period (your 15 mins), then you
    >> probably don't have the router's settings right yet. If turning your
    >> computer off makes the router disconnect, then it is probably computer
    >> generated traffic (or the router sensing the ethernet card in your
    >> computer). If turning the computer off makes the modem disconnect,
    >> you can see if it is the ethernet card by putting a password on your
    >> computer so that you have to login, and restarting your computer, but
    >> not logging in. That will leave your ethernet card on, but because
    >> you haven't logged in, no programs should be running on your machine
    >> generating traffic.
    >>
    >> Hope this helps,
    >> -Chris

    >
    > There is another possibility here.
    > Some years ago I had a significant problem with the modem/router pair being
    > quite active when the computer was not in use. This was in win98 days,
    > before all the 'phone home' concerns.
    > It ended up that a few of the web sites I had visited kept sending whatever
    > they needed to, to keep the connection open. Apparently this was done to
    > enable faster access to their content (ads?) if I re-opened IE or Netscape
    > You may wish to examine your incoming/outgoing traffic from the router and
    > compare that to what is reported by the computer.
    > If you modem or router is receiving packets, you will not get a period of
    > inactivity when your computer is shut down.
    >
    > Stuart


    And, because this is traffic from the outside in, your software
    firewall (on the computer) will drop it, but it will get through to
    your router, which is before the software firewall. If you are using
    a firewall in the router itself, then the router will still get the
    traffic but drop it. Thus, it will still be flowing through the
    modem, keeping it active.

    So, if you have outside traffic coming in, your link may still be
    active, and thus your router not disconnecting, even if you have it
    configured "right" (i.e. to disconnect on inactivity).

    -Chris
    Chris F Clark, Oct 23, 2006
    #13
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