Re: Privacy/Security: How to change my IP address daily or weekly on DSL

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On 18 Oct 2006 19:05:09 -0700, wrote:
    >>>Just like I pull the curtain shut when I dress in the dressing room, I
    >>>enjoy my privacy even when I try on clothes.

    >
    > Another poor comparison.


    Hi I_AM_Raptor,

    I do appreciate your honing of our analogies. With analogies, we can
    communicate. For example, I've shown (I hope) with my basic analogies that
    not everyone who desires a base modicum of privacy is to be automatically
    considered overly paranoid.

    Everyone is confusing one key point. I am not trying to hide from my ISP by
    changing my IP address! I agree even before the first word was posted that
    the IPS knows who I am at all moments (heck, I pay the bill with a check
    that has my name and address on it). Anyone who insists on repeating that
    changing the IP address doesn't hide me from the ISP is just plain off
    base.

    It's sort of like having an (IP) address on your driver license and then
    changing it. You're never going to hide from the police by changing your
    address on your driver's license but the local store that wrote it down
    when you cashed your check now has a harder time casually finding you from
    a simple (and all too common) database search.

    That's all I was trying to do by changing my router's IP address (which
    turns out to be the IP address attached as the NNTP posting host no matter
    what I do).

    If someone technical here can show me how to CHANGE MY NNTP POSTING HOST,
    well then, THAT would be an accomplishment worthy of the discussion!
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. "#2 Aluxe" <>
    wrote in message news:1x0ddc5p4kf6z.1mldsw3zfaym2$...

    > If someone technical here can show me how to
    >CHANGE MY NNTP POSTING HOST,
    > well then, THAT would be an accomplishment worthy of the discussion!


    Thats EASY !
    Change your gateway's IP address,
    as that is what your NTTP server see as your NNTP posting host.
    The gateway IP, will be your "point of contact" IP address, for the
    device terminating your ISP to yourself.

    End of discussion! ;-)

    /HC

    btw:
    I assume your ISP provides you with a dynamic IP, using DHCP.
    Most DHCP servers will remember your MACadress, and offer you
    tha same IP adress again if you simply switch off/on, you will have to
    _release _ your current IP, and /request/ a new IP for it to change.
    Harald Andersen, Oct 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. #2 Aluxe

    #3 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 15:13:13 +0200, Harald Andersen wrote:
    >> If someone technical here can show me how to
    >>CHANGE MY NNTP POSTING HOST,
    >> well then, THAT would be an accomplishment worthy of the discussion!

    >
    > Thats EASY !
    > Change your gateway's IP address,
    > as that is what your NTTP server see as your NNTP posting host.
    > The gateway IP, will be your "point of contact" IP address, for the
    > device terminating your ISP to yourself.


    Hi Harald Andersen,

    If by "gateway", you mean "modem" (I have DHCP DSL PPPoE), then that is
    what we were doing all along way before this thread ever started.

    I have a new IP address today but the last test didn't work (changing the
    "connect on demand" setting. But, I might have performed the test wrong so
    I'll try again tonight.

    If you know how to "change your gateway's address" without powering down
    the router ... that would answer the original question nicely.
    #3 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #3
  4. "#3 Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:lhtlzwhl0etl.pnhihrts7g7e$...
    > On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 15:13:13 +0200, Harald Andersen wrote:
    >>> If someone technical here can show me how to
    >>>CHANGE MY NNTP POSTING HOST,
    >>> well then, THAT would be an accomplishment worthy of the discussion!

    >>
    >> Thats EASY !
    >> Change your gateway's IP address,
    >> as that is what your NTTP server see as your NNTP posting host.
    >> The gateway IP, will be your "point of contact" IP address, for the
    >> device terminating your ISP to yourself.

    >
    > Hi Harald Andersen,
    >
    > If by "gateway", you mean "modem" (I have DHCP DSL PPPoE), then that
    > is
    > what we were doing all along way before this thread ever started.
    >
    > I have a new IP address today but the last test didn't work (changing
    > the
    > "connect on demand" setting. But, I might have performed the test
    > wrong so
    > I'll try again tonight.
    >
    > If you know how to "change your gateway's address" without powering
    > down
    > the router ... that would answer the original question nicely.


    Refresh my memory (as I dont want to re-read the complete thread) :
    1 - What is the name/model of your modem ?
    2 - What is the name/model of your router ?
    3 - Please open a command window, give the command :
    "IPCONFIG / ALL" and post the full info it provides.
    (This is related to my last paragraph in my first post).


    btw:
    If you want more "privacy", you might look into this :
    http://www.iopus.com/ipig but remember if you use this,
    or any other form of proxy, your NNTP server might
    want you to autenthificate using username/password.......

    /HC
    Harald Andersen, Oct 20, 2006
    #4
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