Re: Privacy/Security: How to change my IP address daily or weekly on DSL

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Wed, 18 Oct 2006 18:09:36 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    > Am I missing something here?
    > Who cares about some IP the ISP's NG server is using?


    Hi Duane,

    Yep. I think you're missing something. Either that, or I am. :)

    Apparently in your world, the NNTP posting host is the ISP's news server.
    If that were the case in my world, then the NNTP posting host would remain
    static as I don't change that (even when I do change it, it wouldn't matter
    as you'll soon see if you keep your eyes open).

    You see, in my world ... unfortunately for me ... the NNTP posting host is
    apparently my router's IP address. At least that is what seems to show up.

    For example, my router currently is telling me that my IP address is
    "69.110.8.45" based on a "Status" "Router" "IP Address" command in my web
    browser connected to the router's port 80.

    In your world, that wouldn't show up as your NNTP posting host but I
    suspect that, in my world, that IP address will show up as my NNTP posting
    host, no matter what actual NNTP posting host I choose out of the scores
    provided to me by my ISP.

    Let me know if I am right or wrong.
    --
    Aluxe (new IP address)
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. #2 Aluxe

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "#2 Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:1vgc57xuc64am.111g0or8twxgw$...
    > On Wed, 18 Oct 2006 18:09:36 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    >> Am I missing something here?
    >> Who cares about some IP the ISP's NG server is using?

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    >
    > Yep. I think you're missing something. Either that, or I am. :)
    >
    > Apparently in your world, the NNTP posting host is the ISP's news server.
    > If that were the case in my world, then the NNTP posting host would remain
    > static as I don't change that (even when I do change it, it wouldn't
    > matter
    > as you'll soon see if you keep your eyes open).


    There is nothing you can do about *anything* when it comes to the IP the NG
    server is using. You're (your machine is just) a client and you the client
    can do *nothing* about the IP being used by the NNTP server.

    http://www.tech-faq.com/nntp.shtml


    >
    > You see, in my world ... unfortunately for me ... the NNTP posting host is
    > apparently my router's IP address. At least that is what seems to show up.


    So, the information about the IP that's assigned to your router from the ISP
    to communicate on their network and the NNTP are the same IP. It's only an
    IP that's pointing back to the ISP's network It doesn't mean that the IP is
    pointing to an NNTP server.

    >
    > For example, my router currently is telling me that my IP address is
    > "69.110.8.45" based on a "Status" "Router" "IP Address" command in my web
    > browser connected to the router's port 80.
    >
    > In your world, that wouldn't show up as your NNTP posting host but I
    > suspect that, in my world, that IP address will show up as my NNTP posting
    > host, no matter what actual NNTP posting host I choose out of the scores
    > provided to me by my ISP.


    Port 80 and port (119 NNTP port) are two different ports and two different
    protcols. HTTP traffic is on port 80 and NNTP traffic is on port 119. The
    common factor is the IP assigned by the ISP to the modem, your public IP.
    But I would suspect that port 119 traffic is forwarded/routed to another
    IP/machine on the ISP's network whether or not the NNTP server is
    physically sitting on the ISP's network.



    But again, what does any of this have to do with the context of your
    original post about *secuirty and privacy*?



    I'll tell you. It means nothing.



    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Oct 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 04:48:18 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    > There is nothing you can do about *anything* when it comes to the IP the NG
    > server is using. You're (your machine is just) a client and you the client
    > can do *nothing* about the IP being used by the NNTP server.
    > http://www.tech-faq.com/nntp.shtml


    Hi Duane,
    This is very interesting.

    Can I infer from your helpful reply that I can do nothing to change what is
    listed as my NNTP posting host (being my router's unique IP address).

    For example, if I look at the header of YOUR posts, I see:
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 4.252.209.155
    Does that mean your router currently has that IP address?

    But, that doesnt' mesh with what I see by looking at other people's posts.
    For example, posts from "Dana" or "Mark McIntyre" don't even seem to have
    an NNTP Posting Host line. And those from "Warren Oates" have the news
    server as the NNTP posting host:
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 5b202376.news.astraweb.com

    Does YOUR NNTP posting host indicate your news server or your router's IP
    address?

    The better question would be how can we remove the NNTP Posting Host line
    from our posts like "Dana" and "Mark McIntyre" seem to cleverly achieved?
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #3
  4. #2 Aluxe

    Dana Guest

    "#2 Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:15o0jkiohjbpj$...
    > On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 04:48:18 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    > > There is nothing you can do about *anything* when it comes to the IP the

    NG
    > > server is using. You're (your machine is just) a client and you the

    client
    > > can do *nothing* about the IP being used by the NNTP server.
    > > http://www.tech-faq.com/nntp.shtml

    >
    > Hi Duane,
    > This is very interesting.
    >
    > Can I infer from your helpful reply that I can do nothing to change what

    is
    > listed as my NNTP posting host (being my router's unique IP address).
    >
    > For example, if I look at the header of YOUR posts, I see:
    > NNTP-Posting-Host: 4.252.209.155
    > Does that mean your router currently has that IP address?
    >
    > But, that doesnt' mesh with what I see by looking at other people's posts.
    > For example, posts from "Dana" or "Mark McIntyre" don't even seem to have
    > an NNTP Posting Host line. And those from "Warren Oates" have the news
    > server as the NNTP posting host:
    > NNTP-Posting-Host: 5b202376.news.astraweb.com
    >
    > Does YOUR NNTP posting host indicate your news server or your router's IP
    > address?
    >
    > The better question would be how can we remove the NNTP Posting Host line
    > from our posts like "Dana" and "Mark McIntyre" seem to cleverly achieved?


    Since I am using OE there is not a lot I can do to my headers, especially
    changing my nntp posting host. According to the RFC for NNTP, your news
    server can remove that if the client (for me outlook express) sends it.
    So I am thinking it is my ISP that is doing the removal, or it is your news
    reader.
    Since you seem to have so much time, the posts with no nntp posting host,
    are they all using the same reader like I am using outlook express.
    Dana, Oct 19, 2006
    #4
  5. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Wed, 18 Oct 2006 22:05:22 -0800, Dana wrote:
    > The posts with no nntp posting host,
    > are they all using the same reader like I am using outlook express.


    Hi Dana,

    Nope. For example, Mark McIntyre's header implies he is using:
    X-Newsreader: Forte Agent 3.3/32.846

    I will download and install Forte Agent to see if it's the newsreader or
    the ISP who is forcing my NNTP Posting Host to be the same unique IP
    address as my router.

    If the solution (to not post my unique IP address with every post) is as
    simple as switching newsreaders, that's would finally be the technial
    answer I was looking for all along.

    It's so easy to get emotional ... it's much harder to answer the question!
    :)
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #5
  6. #2 Aluxe

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "#2 Aluxe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 18 Oct 2006 22:05:22 -0800, Dana wrote:
    >> The posts with no nntp posting host,
    >> are they all using the same reader like I am using outlook express.

    >
    > Hi Dana,
    >
    > Nope. For example, Mark McIntyre's header implies he is using:
    > X-Newsreader: Forte Agent 3.3/32.846
    >
    > I will download and install Forte Agent to see if it's the newsreader or
    > the ISP who is forcing my NNTP Posting Host to be the same unique IP
    > address as my router.
    >
    > If the solution (to not post my unique IP address with every post) is as
    > simple as switching newsreaders, that's would finally be the technial
    > answer I was looking for all along.
    >
    > It's so easy to get emotional ... it's much harder to answer the question!
    > :)


    It really means nothing in the long run as no one can come past the router
    with the IP unless you started manually opening up ports. But if using a NG
    read that allows you to mask your IP makes you feel better, then by all
    means use one. :)

    You should have started another thread. *How can I mask the NNTP post IP in
    the headers?* ;)

    By the way, the answer to your other post to me as to why the NNTP post IP
    is changing for me is that I am using a dial-up connection to the ISP and
    that IP is going to change each and every time I dial-up to the ISP.

    When I am connected to my network protected by an appliance such as a router
    with a BB connection, then I don't care if someone sees the IP or not in
    the headers, as it means nothing to me -- no one is coming past the router
    from the Internet.

    The problem is behind the router with a machine that has been compromised by
    malware with someone with the happy fingers that clicked on something that
    lead to the compormise.

    Duane :)
    ..
    Duane Arnold, Oct 19, 2006
    #6
  7. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 06:38:13 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    > It really means nothing in the long run as no one can come past the router
    > with the IP unless you started manually opening up ports.


    Hi Duane,
    Thanks for the helpful response. I'm only responding in _this_ post to the
    one un-helpful part of your response because I think this kind of confusion
    is the reason this thread has taken so long to get to the very good results
    it has achieved for all of us.

    This post is not about security! It is MY FAULT for using that word in the
    initial post and in the subject line! I apologize.

    I don't care (for the purpose of this post) if a zillion zombies attack my
    NNTP posting host (which is, in reality, my modem's IP address). I don't
    care if a hundred viruses and worms and malware malfeasants attack me
    directly (again, for the purpose of this post).

    What I care about is making is harder for someone (my kids perhaps, or my
    spouse, or my employer, or you, or some kook, etc.) to connect all my
    various posts together.

    I have a professional life to maintain and I maintain it on the Internet.
    I have a personal life to maintain and I partly maintain it on the
    Internet.
    And, I have technical needs and folks like you on the Internet help me.

    All I am asking is for help in keeping those Internet "lives" separate with
    the simplese, cheapest, easiest methods possible (and simply changing the
    IP address of my modem on demand seems to be a viable method to me).

    I'll answer your other (more helpful and to the point) responses
    separately.
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #7
  8. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 06:38:13 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    > You should have started another thread. *How can I mask the NNTP post IP in
    > the headers?* ;)


    Hi Duane,
    We have all learned a lot in this thread. I, for one, have probably learned
    more than all of you combined (since you knew so much more than I to start
    with).

    I agree with you.

    In fact, if I had known what I know now, I _would_ have asked the specific
    technical questions:

    1. How can I mask my NNTP posting IP in my nntp headers?
    2. What is the easiest way to change my modem's IP address?
    3. If I reset my MAC to the original address, is the change bit also reset?

    :)
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #8
  9. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 06:38:13 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote
    > When I am connected to my network protected by an appliance such as a router
    > with a BB connection, then I don't care if someone sees the IP or not in
    > the headers, as it means nothing to me -- no one is coming past the router
    > from the Internet.
    >
    > The problem is behind the router with a machine that has been compromised by
    > malware with someone with the happy fingers that clicked on something that
    > lead to the compormise.


    Hi Duane,

    Again, I don't mean to pick on you, but, I guess I need to repeat that what
    you state above it wholly irrevelant to the conversation. Yes, I know I
    used the word "security" in my subject line ... and for that I am
    constantly punished by people saying I won't get security (as you have said
    time and time again).

    I will repeat that I am not at all worried about my ISP knowing who I am
    nor am I (in this thread anyway) worried about someone "attacking" me
    because they now know my modem's IP address.

    I am not worried (in this thread) about malware.
    I am not asking (in this thread) about compromised machines.
    I am not speaking (in this thread) about someone with happy fingers leading
    to a compromise.

    Can we please stay on topic (where we have done quite well when we have)?
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #9
  10. ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.security.firewalls.]
    #2 Aluxe <> skriver:
    > On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 06:38:13 GMT, Duane Arnold wrote:
    >> It really means nothing in the long run as no one can come past the router

    > All I am asking is for help in keeping those Internet "lives" separate with
    > the simplese, cheapest, easiest methods possible (and simply changing the
    > IP address of my modem on demand seems to be a viable method to me).


    However all experts in this area seams to thibk that you are wrong in
    that assumtion. Changeing the IP-address doesn't help your privacy.
    As ip-addresses in dial-up networks change all the time there are
    other methods of tracking you down anyhow.

    / Balp
    --
    http://anders.arnholm.nu/ Keep on Balping
    Anders Arnholm, Oct 19, 2006
    #10
  11. #2 Aluxe

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <15o0jkiohjbpj$>,
    #2 Aluxe <> wrote:

    > But, that doesnt' mesh with what I see by looking at other people's posts.
    > For example, posts from "Dana" or "Mark McIntyre" don't even seem to have
    > an NNTP Posting Host line. And those from "Warren Oates" have the news
    > server as the NNTP posting host:
    > NNTP-Posting-Host: 5b202376.news.astraweb.com


    Look, that header is used by news providers to help prevent abuse.
    Astraweb file my originating IP address away in a database in case
    anyone complains about me, or they get a court order to give up my ide
    or like that. Then they just put the database reference in the header. I
    pay Astraweb for that little bit of privacy. Astraweb is _real_ cheap
    too, if you don't download binaries ever.
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: Like what?
    Teal'c: I am unsure, he is concealing it.
    Warren Oates, Oct 19, 2006
    #11
  12. #2 Aluxe

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <>,
    #2 Aluxe <> wrote:

    > I will download and install Forte Agent to see if it's the newsreader or
    > the ISP who is forcing my NNTP Posting Host to be the same unique IP
    > address as my router.


    IT'S THE NNTP PROVIDER
    IT'S THE NNTP PROVIDER
    (which may or may not be your ISP).
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: Like what?
    Teal'c: I am unsure, he is concealing it.
    Warren Oates, Oct 19, 2006
    #12
  13. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 07:26:48 -0400, Warren Oates wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > #2 Aluxe <> wrote:
    >
    >> I will download and install Forte Agent to see if it's the newsreader or
    >> the ISP who is forcing my NNTP Posting Host to be the same unique IP
    >> address as my router.

    >
    > IT'S THE NNTP PROVIDER
    > IT'S THE NNTP PROVIDER
    > (which may or may not be your ISP).


    Hi Warren Oates,
    What are you trying to say?

    Are you saying that every single person who used the same ISP as I do will
    have a DIFFERENT nntp posting host because the ISP is using the IP
    addressed assigned to the subscriber as the nntp posting host?

    If you're not saying that, then what you say doesn't jive with the actual
    results (notice my nntp posting host is again changed as I change my IP
    address daily and my nntp posting host follows suit).
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #13
  14. #2 Aluxe

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <>,
    #2 Aluxe <> wrote:

    > Are you saying that every single person who used the same ISP as I do will
    > have a DIFFERENT nntp posting host because the ISP is using the IP
    > addressed assigned to the subscriber as the nntp posting host?


    Yes.

    Also, I checked my router's settings, and yes, one can set one's router
    to "On Demand" connection (mine's a Dlink) _IF_ one's using PPPoE to
    connect to one's ISP, but not with DHCP; I'm not sure which you're
    using.

    Umm. Router's talk about WAN and LAN. The WAN is your connection via
    your ISP to the Internet (to the router); the LAN is everything
    connected to the router in your house. Your router gives out DHCP
    addresses, your ISP may or may not. Mine doesn't, it's PPPoE.

    Anyway, look into your router's settings. It won't guarantee a change of
    IP address every time you wake your service up (that's my way of saying
    it, it's not "jargon"), but it will increase your chances of getting a
    different one. I don't think there's any way to guarantee that you won't
    ever get the same IP address - there was a court case that revolved
    around this in Canada.
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: Like what?
    Teal'c: I am unsure, he is concealing it.
    Warren Oates, Oct 19, 2006
    #14
  15. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 11:33:02 -0400, Warren Oates wrote:
    > Also, I checked my router's settings, and yes, one can set one's router
    > to "On Demand" connection (mine's a Dlink) _IF_ one's using PPPoE to
    > connect to one's ISP, but not with DHCP; I'm not sure which you're
    > using.


    Hi Warren Oates,
    Thank you for the response to the question.

    Yes, I am using PPPoE and DHCP on DSL with a Linksys router and a DSL modem
    (if that helps narrow down the conversation).

    I have set my on-demand max-idle-time setting to 5 minutes.

    Are you saying that because I am both PPPoE and DHCP, that this setting
    won't actually work?
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #15
  16. #2 Aluxe

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <>,
    #2 Aluxe <> wrote:

    > Are you saying that because I am both PPPoE and DHCP, that this setting
    > won't actually work?


    No. My guess is that your router's connected to your ISP via PPPoE, and
    that you're getting addresses from your router via DHCP. Does the router
    show an "on demand" setting?
    --
    W. Oates
    "I thought I was the last son of Krypton, but you people keep popping up."
    Warren Oates, Oct 19, 2006
    #16
  17. #2 Aluxe

    #2 Aluxe Guest

    On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 11:40:39 -0400, Warren Oates wrote:
    >> Are you saying that because I am both PPPoE and DHCP, that this setting
    >> won't actually work?

    >
    > No. My guess is that your router's connected to your ISP via PPPoE, and
    > that you're getting addresses from your router via DHCP. Does the router
    > show an "on demand" setting?


    Hi Warren Oates,
    Thanks again for asking the right questions.

    Are you asking about the IP address that the COMPUTER has? I'm not. I'm
    talking only about the one unique address (on the Internet) that my ISP has
    assigned to my account at that time.

    There is some debate here whether it's the router or the dsl modem that is
    getting assigned the address via DHCP ... but let me answer your questions:

    QUESTION: Is your router connected to your ISP by PPPoE?
    ANSWER: yes.

    QUESTION: Are you getting addresses from your ISP via DHCP?
    ANSWER: yes

    QUESTION: Does the linksys router show an "on demand" setting?
    ANSWER: I have set my on-demand max-idle-time setting to 5 minutes as per
    kingthorin's helpful suggestions.

    Thank you for helping us out. Hopefully these latest settings will cause
    the ISP to give up my IP address when the computers are idle for a few
    hours and then hopefully (this is the clincher) the PPPoE connection will
    be AUTOMATICALLY established to the ISP (without having to reboot the
    router) so that a new IP address is obtained automatically.
    #2 Aluxe, Oct 19, 2006
    #17
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