Re: Photoshop CS4 hardware question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by SteveG, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. SteveG

    SteveG Guest

    Longfellow wrote:
    > I'm planning on building a PC dedicated to Photoshop CS4 and the latest
    > Lightroom. I'm told that for a workflow that does not depend on
    > continuous coffee breaks to allow the machine to crunch image data, a
    > very powerful machine is requisite. I'm told that a 64 bit system with
    > as much RAM as one can afford is what makes it possible to fiddle with
    > multiple layers and do extensive comparison of effects, etc. I do know
    > that a timely response from the machine is necessary to keep the
    > creative juices from stagnating (shriveling on the vine, so to speak),
    > so those requirements make some sense to me.
    >
    > OTOH, I'm told that CS4 runs just fine on much less powerful systems,
    > that a 32 bit system is more than enough to handle anything that one
    > might want to do with Photoshop. As I don't have access to the code of
    > Photoshop, I can't evaluate it's ability to shine on such systems, but
    > I'm not that sanguine about coding miracles from Adobe in any case.
    >
    > Some of these issues are addressed in an excerpt from "Real World
    > Adobe Photoshop CS4 for Photographers" by Chavez and Blatner. Check out:
    > http://www.peachpit.com/articles/printerfriendly.aspx?p=1247538
    > A local acquaintance has touted very expensive Apple systems, while
    > others talk about laptops, saying that they are more than good enough.
    >
    > I really don't want to have to hock the house for a genuinely useful
    > system, but if that is what it takes... nah, the house is safe, but
    > other money pits that yawn nearby are surely not. On their behalf,
    > therefore, a question in this regard is appropriate. So...
    >
    > What is the experience of CS4 users in these regards? What sort of
    > system works best? What sort of system works well enough that using it
    > is not an onerous task? What am I looking at here? And what is it that
    > I don't understand; what question do I need to ask that I'm not asking?
    >
    > Another question: What is the experience with good LCD monitors? What
    > is a "good" LCD monitor and why is it "good"? I've got a couple of good
    > CRT monitors, but don't know that they can be replaced. The guy that
    > talks up the Apple system claims to have one, but he says that it's very
    > expensive (presumably it's an Apple monitor). What is the reality here?
    > Anyone know?
    >
    > Thanks for reading. All useful responses will be duly appreciated.
    >
    > Longfellow
    >


    Windows PC requirements for Photoshop CS4 - from Adobe's web site:
    * 1.8GHz or faster processor
    * Microsoft® Windows® XP with Service Pack 2 (Service Pack 3
    recommended) or Windows Vista® Home Premium, Business, Ultimate, or
    Enterprise with Service Pack 1 (certified for 32-bit Windows XP and
    32-bit and 64-bit Windows Vista)
    * 512MB of RAM (1GB recommended)
    * 1GB of available hard-disk space for installation; additional
    free space required during installation (cannot install on flash-based
    storage devices)
    * 1,024x768 display (1,280x800 recommended) with 16-bit video card
    * Some GPU-accelerated features require graphics support for Shader
    Model 3.0 and OpenGL 2.0
    * DVD-ROM drive
    * QuickTime 7.2 software required for multimedia features
    * Broadband Internet connection required for online services*

    Personally I run CS4 on both my desktop (AMD Athlon 64 running at 3.2GHz
    with 1.3GB of RAM and Vista Home Premium in 32bit mode) and my laptop
    (IBM Thinkpad R31, 1.2GHz Intel Celeron and 632MB Ram on Windows XP
    Home). Yes, the desktop machine runs faster but the laptop doesn't ever
    go into "make a coffee" mode :)

    If you want to know if your computer will handle CS4 just download the
    trial version from the website and check it out.

    I can't comment on LCD screens. My HP L1810 was bought used off eBay and
    I think it's very good but have nothing to compare it to. Prior to the
    HP I used a 20" IBM CRT monitor and only went for an LCD to reclaim some
    of my desk space. I've never calibrated it - wouldn't know how.

    HTH

    --
    Regards

    Steve G
    SteveG, Jan 10, 2009
    #1
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  2. SteveG

    Father Kodak Guest

    On Sat, 10 Jan 2009 21:01:18 GMT, SteveG <_@_._> wrote:

    >Longfellow wrote:
    >> I'm planning on building a PC dedicated to Photoshop CS4 and the latest
    >> Lightroom. I'm told that for a workflow that does not depend on
    >> continuous coffee breaks to allow the machine to crunch image data, a


    [snip]

    >>
    >> Thanks for reading. All useful responses will be duly appreciated.
    >>
    >> Longfellow
    >>

    >
    >Windows PC requirements for Photoshop CS4 - from Adobe's web site:


    Just be aware that in general, vendor recommendations are for
    barely-running systems that do little more than boot up and look cute.
    Others have correctly pointed out the reasons for the big range in
    systems that appear to satisfy their owners.

    Without knowing your workflow and subject types, and image sizes, it's
    not possible to be too definitive. However, I think at a minimum, you
    should build a 64-bit system, even if you don't plan to run Vista 64
    today. Windows XP 64 is/was a non-starter due to poor driver support.

    Even if it costs a bit more, I would get a motherboard based on one of
    the most recent Intel products, e.g. the i7. Such CPUs will only get
    cheaper and/or faster over time. By buying into a relatively new CPU
    and chipset, you allow yourself a mid-life CPU upgrade possibility.

    It's fascinating how people have focused on just one or two aspects of
    system performance. But don't forget that for _decent_ performance
    you will want a second hard drive for swap/scratch. For really big
    bucks you can go SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) with very high bandwidth
    and drives that spin at 15K. (they will also "spin" your wallet
    accordingly.) Also, considering the time-value of images, don't
    forget about backup.

    Father Kodak
    Father Kodak, Jan 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. SteveG

    D.Mac Guest

    "Father Kodak" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 10 Jan 2009 21:01:18 GMT, SteveG <_@_._> wrote:
    >
    >>Longfellow wrote:
    >>> I'm planning on building a PC dedicated to Photoshop CS4 and the latest
    >>> Lightroom. I'm told that for a workflow that does not depend on
    >>> continuous coffee breaks to allow the machine to crunch image data, a

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for reading. All useful responses will be duly appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Longfellow
    >>>

    >>
    >>Windows PC requirements for Photoshop CS4 - from Adobe's web site:

    >
    > Just be aware that in general, vendor recommendations are for
    > barely-running systems that do little more than boot up and look cute.
    > Others have correctly pointed out the reasons for the big range in
    > systems that appear to satisfy their owners.
    >
    > Without knowing your workflow and subject types, and image sizes, it's
    > not possible to be too definitive. However, I think at a minimum, you
    > should build a 64-bit system, even if you don't plan to run Vista 64
    > today. Windows XP 64 is/was a non-starter due to poor driver support.
    >
    > Even if it costs a bit more, I would get a motherboard based on one of
    > the most recent Intel products, e.g. the i7. Such CPUs will only get
    > cheaper and/or faster over time. By buying into a relatively new CPU
    > and chipset, you allow yourself a mid-life CPU upgrade possibility.
    >
    > It's fascinating how people have focused on just one or two aspects of
    > system performance. But don't forget that for _decent_ performance
    > you will want a second hard drive for swap/scratch. For really big
    > bucks you can go SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) with very high bandwidth
    > and drives that spin at 15K. (they will also "spin" your wallet
    > accordingly.) Also, considering the time-value of images, don't
    > forget about backup.
    >
    > Father Kodak


    I might add to that...
    SATA 10,000 RPM drives are a financially better prospect than SCSI drives
    and only a little (almost not noticeable) slower. If you follow the above
    advise, the Intel chipset does a really nice job of seting up a "RAID" of
    several drives to give you a big boost in performance.

    Douglas
    D.Mac, Jan 15, 2009
    #3
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