Re: Photomatix & HDR (REDUX)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Jun 28, 2009.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 11:43:57 -0500, Yeah - you're pathetic - no doubt
    about it now. <> wrote:

    >Now tell us again why you're such a lame photographer that you couldn't
    >have done that with just one properly exposed frame in less than one minute
    >of editing by using curves?


    I have never seen an HDR image that I find to be appealing. It seems
    to me that it involves taking a good photograph and making something
    harsh and unappealing of it.

    That said, I completely understand Savageduck's interest. Part of the
    fun of photography is trying new techniques and pushing the envelope.
    The process can be an enjoyable learning experience even if the
    results are not something better than the original.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jun 28, 2009
    #1
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  2. On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 13:02:45 -0400, tony cooper wrote:

    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 11:43:57 -0500, Yeah - you're pathetic - no doubt
    > about it now. <> wrote:
    >
    >>Now tell us again why you're such a lame photographer that you couldn't
    >>have done that with just one properly exposed frame in less than one
    >>minute of editing by using curves?

    >
    > I have never seen an HDR image that I find to be appealing.


    How about these?

    http://www.arumes.com/photo/fullsize/CRW_2840.jpg
    http://www.arumes.com/photo/fullsize/CRW_3356.jpg

    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 28, 2009
    #2
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  3. "Savageduck" <savageduck@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2009062810251895335-savageduck@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2009-06-28 10:16:14 -0700, Robert Spanjaard <> said:
    >
    > As I said, I am just starting out on the climb up this learning curve, and
    > I will probably find more suitable subjects for HDR in the future.


    Bad luck might have made the picture ghastly but I've seen a more compelling
    HDR photos that were helped by having good luck behind them. It's a credit
    to you that you saw an opportunity and gave it a shake. The conversation was
    interesting and there's always next time.

    --
    Charles E Hardwidge
    Charles E Hardwidge, Jun 29, 2009
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jun 2009 12:43:41 +0100, bugbear
    <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 11:43:57 -0500, Yeah - you're pathetic - no doubt
    >> about it now. <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Now tell us again why you're such a lame photographer that you couldn't
    >>> have done that with just one properly exposed frame in less than one minute
    >>> of editing by using curves?

    >>
    >> I have never seen an HDR image that I find to be appealing. It seems
    >> to me that it involves taking a good photograph and making something
    >> harsh and unappealing of it.

    >
    >It's quite possible you have, but didn't know it was HDR - I'm assuming
    >what you don't like is the super-saturated colours and
    >too-contrasty skies.
    >
    >Neither of these is compulsory.


    The HDR examples I've seen are, to me, reminiscent of Thomas Kincade's
    "art". The gimmick factor outweighs everything else.

    That's not a knock on this technique. It's a comment regarding my own
    opinion of them. Photographs that do appeal to me are not necessarily
    appealing to others.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jun 29, 2009
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    dmoney Guest

    On Jun 28, 1:02 pm, tony cooper <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 11:43:57 -0500, Yeah - you're pathetic - no doubt
    > about it now. <> wrote:
    >
    > >Now tell us again why you're such a lame photographer that you couldn't
    > >have done that with just one properly exposed frame in less than one minute
    > >of editing by using curves?

    >
    > I have never seen an HDR image that I find to be appealing.   It seems
    > to me that it involves taking a good photograph and making something
    > harsh and unappealing of it.
    >
    > That said, I completely understand Savageduck's interest.  Part of the
    > fun of photography is trying new techniques and pushing the envelope.
    > The process can be an enjoyable learning experience even if the
    > results are not something better than the original.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    I agree,HDR is great if you want to make portraits that look aggesive
    or angry or scenery that always looks as if a storm is coming or
    leaving
    dmoney, Jun 29, 2009
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jun 2009 07:15:47 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2009-06-29 05:50:51 -0700, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> -----------<Le Snip>-----------------------

    >
    >> The HDR examples I've seen are, to me, reminiscent of Thomas Kincade's
    >> "art". The gimmick factor outweighs everything else.

    >
    >The horror! The horror!
    >>
    >> That's not a knock on this technique. It's a comment regarding my own
    >> opinion of them. Photographs that do appeal to me are not necessarily
    >> appealing to others.

    >
    >Ken posted this link http://www.pbase.com/moorlands which gives me hope
    >that some subtle results are achievable with HDR processing.
    >What I am learning is, a fair degree of planning is needed to get
    >decent results with HDR. Trying to save an image or capture in
    >difficult light needs good preparation and I have seen examples which
    >led me to believe it is possible to get pleasing results.
    >
    >The image I used for my initiation into HDR was not well planned as
    >there were several factors I was ignorant of when I made the decission
    >to try. I took the multiple exposures knowing this was going to be a
    >learning project for me, and not knowing where it was going to lead, or
    >the results I would get.
    >
    >I just used -1;0;+1 for the 3 exposures as I knew the concept and the
    >ability of my D300. I did not know I should have minimally been using a
    >-2 to +2 range with a minimum of 3 exposures, or as many as 9.
    >
    >Anyway I find the concept interesting, and I know pleasing results are
    >achievable (please let them be far removed from your Kincade analogy!!)
    >:)
    >
    >...and I need all sorts of things to keep me out of bars with this
    >retirement deal that I am just getting used to.


    My comments are in no way a reflection on your efforts. I'm an
    inveterate experimenter in Photoshop. I completely understand the
    motivation to learn and master any type of technique.

    I'll try things like post-processing in high key just to play around.
    I may not like the results, but the trip is interesting.

    I've never been one to criticize styles that I don't particularly care
    for. It's kinda like anchovies on pizza: not for me, but I recognize
    that my tastes are not universal.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jun 29, 2009
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jun 2009 15:43:53 +0100, bugbear
    <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >> The HDR examples I've seen are, to me, reminiscent of Thomas Kincade's
    >> "art". The gimmick factor outweighs everything else.
    >>
    >> That's not a knock on this technique. It's a comment regarding my own
    >> opinion of them. Photographs that do appeal to me are not necessarily
    >> appealing to others.

    >
    >Well, here's a photo I took to illustrate the lighting
    >I used to photograph some saw teeth (one of my other hobbies
    >involves hand tools).
    >
    >http://galootcentral.com/components/cpgalbums/userpics/10152/saw_how_top_close.jpg
    >
    >I make no claims for "Art" in this photo, since its purpose
    >was purely illustrative.
    >
    >However, I found HDR techniques by far the most convenient way
    >to capture it.
    >
    >And no unnatural colours (depending on your opinion
    >of my room's wallpaper :)
    >
    > BugBear


    If that's HDR, it's minimalist enough to not be glaringly so. I am
    much more impressed by the Rube Goldberg copy stand. I've put
    together some similar contraptions for straight-down photography of
    objects.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jun 29, 2009
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 30 Jun 2009 10:22:35 +0100, bugbear
    <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Mon, 29 Jun 2009 15:43:53 +0100, bugbear
    >> <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >>
    >>> tony cooper wrote:
    >>>> The HDR examples I've seen are, to me, reminiscent of Thomas Kincade's
    >>>> "art". The gimmick factor outweighs everything else.
    >>>>
    >>>> That's not a knock on this technique. It's a comment regarding my own
    >>>> opinion of them. Photographs that do appeal to me are not necessarily
    >>>> appealing to others.
    >>> Well, here's a photo I took to illustrate the lighting
    >>> I used to photograph some saw teeth (one of my other hobbies
    >>> involves hand tools).
    >>>
    >>> http://galootcentral.com/components/cpgalbums/userpics/10152/saw_how_top_close.jpg
    >>>
    >>> I make no claims for "Art" in this photo, since its purpose
    >>> was purely illustrative.
    >>>
    >>> However, I found HDR techniques by far the most convenient way
    >>> to capture it.
    >>>
    >>> And no unnatural colours (depending on your opinion
    >>> of my room's wallpaper :)
    >>>
    >>> BugBear

    >>
    >> If that's HDR, it's minimalist enough to not be glaringly so.

    >
    >But it's not - the DR in the scene is EXTREME, from shadow to light bulb;
    >but the colours in the final image aren't weird. HDR is NOT about saturated colours, that appears
    >to be a quirk of PhotoMatix (and perhaps the people who use it)
    >
    > > I am
    >> much more impressed by the Rube Goldberg copy stand.

    >
    >Heath-Robinson, please ;-)


    Heath-Robinson drew mostly in black-and-white.
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a1/Heath_Robinson_WWI.png


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jun 30, 2009
    #8
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