Re: Photo overload

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by sarge137, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. sarge137

    sarge137 Guest

    On Jul 9, 11:37 am, "Russell D." <> wrote:
    > One thing that has become very clear, my new foray into digital
    > photography is going to produce a lot of pictures which translates into
    > a lot of files on my computer. So, I would be interested in some
    > thoughts on how to organize these files. The files come from my camera
    > with just sequential numbers, not very descriptive of what the photo is.
    > During organization, do you rename these files so you know better what
    > the photo is from the file name?
    >
    > Is there some good software out there that helps organize photos? I
    > spend about 95+% of my computer time using Linux. So far I have been
    > using digiKam and Gwenview but both have there issues. Is there
    > something better? What do you Linux/Unix geekazoids use?
    >
    > I'm not totally opposed to setting up a shared drive that I can access
    > with both Linux and Windows if the best software for the purpose is a
    > Windows only app. What are some good Windows apps for the purpose?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Russell


    Hi Russell,

    You're right that you'll be overwhelmed pretty quickly if you don't
    come up with some kind of a system. There are tons of filing schemes
    and software out there. What's best depends on your own taste. IMO,
    some of the best file management software is free, but you can
    download trial versions of the other stuff.

    Like the other posters, I keep my photos in folders named by the year,
    month and date I took them followed by one or two word description
    (080516BronxZoo; 071113MomsBday; 020608JimsWedding). I don't rename
    the files. That keeps them in chronological order in the folders. If
    I edit the files I just add a letter suffix to the original file name
    (IMG_0125a.jpg; IMG_0125b.jpg, etc) when I "save as". And of course,
    I never save a .jpg more than once. If a shot needs more editing I go
    back to the original and start over.

    As to software, I use IrfanView, a very nice freeware program, for
    file maintenance and light duty editing. For more serious editing I
    use Adobe Photoshop Elements; about 85% of Photoshop CS functionality
    for about 15% of the price. Elements lets me tag files with key words
    so I can easily find them later no matter which folder they're in. I
    don't try to tag everything. But I figure if the shot is important
    enough to open in Elements, thats when it gets a tag. My tags are
    usually just the names of the people in the shot.

    Regards,
    Sarge
    sarge137, Jul 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. sarge137

    tony cooper Guest

    On Wed, 9 Jul 2008 13:58:44 -0700 (PDT), sarge137
    <> wrote:

    >On Jul 9, 11:37 am, "Russell D." <> wrote:
    >> One thing that has become very clear, my new foray into digital
    >> photography is going to produce a lot of pictures which translates into
    >> a lot of files on my computer. So, I would be interested in some
    >> thoughts on how to organize these files. The files come from my camera
    >> with just sequential numbers, not very descriptive of what the photo is.
    >> During organization, do you rename these files so you know better what
    >> the photo is from the file name?
    >>
    >> Is there some good software out there that helps organize photos? I
    >> spend about 95+% of my computer time using Linux. So far I have been
    >> using digiKam and Gwenview but both have there issues. Is there
    >> something better? What do you Linux/Unix geekazoids use?
    >>
    >> I'm not totally opposed to setting up a shared drive that I can access
    >> with both Linux and Windows if the best software for the purpose is a
    >> Windows only app. What are some good Windows apps for the purpose?
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >>
    >> Russell

    >
    >Hi Russell,
    >
    >You're right that you'll be overwhelmed pretty quickly if you don't
    >come up with some kind of a system.



    The best file management key is the "delete" key. If you don't cull
    out the ones that didn't quite make it, the file bloat problem can
    become overwhelming.

    I'm shooting more and more in the burst mode where people are in the
    image. With 40 snaps, I'm bound to get one shot with all eyes open.
    Then, I force myself to delete at least 35 of the 40; often 39.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Jul 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. sarge137

    sarge137 Guest

    On Jul 9, 4:02 pm, tony cooper <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 9 Jul 2008 13:58:44 -0700 (PDT), sarge137
    >
    >
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On Jul 9, 11:37 am, "Russell D." <> wrote:
    > >> One thing that has become very clear, my new foray into digital
    > >> photography is going to produce a lot of pictures which translates into
    > >> a lot of files on my computer. So, I would be interested in some
    > >> thoughts on how to organize these files. The files come from my camera
    > >> with just sequential numbers, not very descriptive of what the photo is.
    > >> During organization, do you rename these files so you know better what
    > >> the photo is from the file name?

    >
    > >> Is there some good software out there that helps organize photos? I
    > >> spend about 95+% of my computer time using Linux. So far I have been
    > >> using digiKam and Gwenview but both have there issues. Is there
    > >> something better? What do you Linux/Unix geekazoids use?

    >
    > >> I'm not totally opposed to setting up a shared drive that I can access
    > >> with both Linux and Windows if the best software for the purpose is a
    > >> Windows only app. What are some good Windows apps for the purpose?

    >
    > >> TIA,

    >
    > >> Russell

    >
    > >Hi Russell,

    >
    > >You're right that you'll be overwhelmed pretty quickly if you don't
    > >come up with some kind of a system.

    >
    > The best file management key is the "delete" key.  If you don't cull
    > out the ones that didn't quite make it, the file bloat problem can
    > become overwhelming.
    >
    > I'm shooting more and more in the burst mode where people are in the
    > image.  With 40 snaps, I'm bound to get one shot with all eyes open.
    > Then, I force myself to delete at least 35 of the 40; often 39.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    Well said. At the end of any given day at least 10%, and on a bad day
    as much as 50% of my shots are deleted almost immediately after
    they're transferred from card to hard drive. And more get deleted
    after I've had a chance to look at them critically.
    sarge137, Jul 9, 2008
    #3
  4. sarge137

    Peter Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 9 Jul 2008 13:58:44 -0700 (PDT), sarge137
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Jul 9, 11:37 am, "Russell D." <> wrote:
    >>> One thing that has become very clear, my new foray into digital
    >>> photography is going to produce a lot of pictures which translates into
    >>> a lot of files on my computer. So, I would be interested in some
    >>> thoughts on how to organize these files. The files come from my camera
    >>> with just sequential numbers, not very descriptive of what the photo is.
    >>> During organization, do you rename these files so you know better what
    >>> the photo is from the file name?
    >>>
    >>> Is there some good software out there that helps organize photos? I
    >>> spend about 95+% of my computer time using Linux. So far I have been
    >>> using digiKam and Gwenview but both have there issues. Is there
    >>> something better? What do you Linux/Unix geekazoids use?
    >>>
    >>> I'm not totally opposed to setting up a shared drive that I can access
    >>> with both Linux and Windows if the best software for the purpose is a
    >>> Windows only app. What are some good Windows apps for the purpose?
    >>>
    >>> TIA,
    >>>
    >>> Russell

    >>
    >>Hi Russell,
    >>
    >>You're right that you'll be overwhelmed pretty quickly if you don't
    >>come up with some kind of a system.

    >
    >
    > The best file management key is the "delete" key. If you don't cull
    > out the ones that didn't quite make it, the file bloat problem can
    > become overwhelming.
    >
    > I'm shooting more and more in the burst mode where people are in the
    > image. With 40 snaps, I'm bound to get one shot with all eyes open.
    > Then, I force myself to delete at least 35 of the 40; often 39.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    Jinx <S>

    --
    Peter
    Peter, Jul 10, 2008
    #4
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