Re: Panorama Photography

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Ralph Fox, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. Ralph Fox

    Ralph Fox Guest

    On Sun, 12 Dec 2010 23:00:01 +1300, in message <4d04a674$>
    collector.nz wrote:

    > Anyone here played with this at all, been looking at it at the moment
    > and find it a big feild with lots of uses.



    I've just started experimenting about 2 months ago.
    I am mainly stitching photos together to produce 360° panoramas.


    So far...

    A. Autostitch is very easy to use and does a good job on
    panoramas up to 180°.

    http://cvlab.epfl.ch/~brown/autostitch/autostitch.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AutoStitch

    Autostitch has never succeeded at a 360° panorama
    for me. Perhaps that's because it is a 'lite'
    free version and UBC want to sell a commercial
    product.


    B. Microsoft ICE is fairly easy to use, but has not
    produced good results for me. The horizon has
    steps in it, and there are frequently obvious join
    lines down through the lawn.

    http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Image_Composite_Editor

    Microsoft label MS-ICE as a "research" product, which
    I interpret to mean it is not yet finished & polished.


    C. Hugin is very powerful but does takes some
    getting in to. Hugin is what I use now if I want
    a good result with a 360° panorama.

    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugin_(software)


    --
    Regards
    Ralph
     
    Ralph Fox, Dec 13, 2010
    #1
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  2. Ralph Fox

    Me Guest

    On 13/12/2010 9:18 p.m., Ralph Fox wrote:
    > On Sun, 12 Dec 2010 23:00:01 +1300, in message<4d04a674$>
    > collector.nz wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone here played with this at all, been looking at it at the moment
    >> and find it a big feild with lots of uses.

    >
    >
    > I've just started experimenting about 2 months ago.
    > I am mainly stitching photos together to produce 360° panoramas.
    >
    >
    > So far...
    >
    > A. Autostitch is very easy to use and does a good job on
    > panoramas up to 180°.
    >
    > http://cvlab.epfl.ch/~brown/autostitch/autostitch.html
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AutoStitch
    >
    > Autostitch has never succeeded at a 360° panorama
    > for me. Perhaps that's because it is a 'lite'
    > free version and UBC want to sell a commercial
    > product.
    >

    A tip for using this is to downscale images so that you can play with
    autostitch settings without needing to wait ages for matching/rendering.
    A paid for program (Autopano Pro) using the same rendering engine is
    quite powerful and intuitive to use.

    >
    >
    > B. Microsoft ICE is fairly easy to use, but has not
    > produced good results for me. The horizon has
    > steps in it, and there are frequently obvious join
    > lines down through the lawn.
    >
    > http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Image_Composite_Editor
    >
    > Microsoft label MS-ICE as a "research" product, which
    > I interpret to mean it is not yet finished& polished.
    >

    I tried it - it sucked, so I deleted it.
    >
    > C. Hugin is very powerful but does takes some
    > getting in to. Hugin is what I use now if I want
    > a good result with a 360° panorama.
    >
    > http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugin_(software)
    >

    Some of the commercial programs use "smartblend", which IIRC is also a
    plugin for Hugin.
    I think photoshop >CS4 also has stitching ability, but I haven't tried
    it - waay too expensive for me.

    I suggest looking at:

    Lens entry pupil measurement. With a small compact camera, entrance
    pupil position won't vary by more than a few cm, but with a larger
    format camera, parallax errors are bigger and can really confuse
    stitching programs. If you're taking shots of a distant scene only,
    then no problem "hand held", but if there are near and close subjects in
    the image, you'll get better results if you rotate the camera on a
    tripod with a panoramic head centered on the lens entry pupil (sometimes
    wrongly called "nodal point") You can measure entrance pupil position
    using a tripod and a couple of toothpicks on a long table, adjust camera
    position on panoramic head until parallax is eliminated. Note that with
    zooms, entrance pupil distance can vary a lot with focal length setting.

    Distortion correction. Some (especially wide angle) lenses have "weird"
    distortion patterns. Most stitching programs can deal with either
    rectilinear (normal) or spherical (fisheye) projection, but can stumble
    when distortion is "weird". Weird "moustache" pattern distortion is
    common with many ultra-wide angle zoom lenses. If having difficulty
    stitching images, try correcting "weird" distortion for each frame
    before stitching using PTlens - or some manufacturers supply distortion
    correction software with their cameras.

    Exposure and white balance. Turn off auto white balance. When the
    camera "guesses" white balance, you can get variability between frames
    which will look weird.
    Smartblend deals well with minor (auto) exposure differences between
    frames, but some cameras have inconsistent auto exposure, and you get
    banding, particularly visible in clear skies. You can use smartblend to
    advantage with manual exposure, by taking multiple frames from bright to
    dark areas on a 360 deg panorama, and adjusting exposure in small
    increments (say 1/3 stop) between frames.

    Gigapan. Google these devices. If you really want to make ultra high
    res images with minimal effort, these are the way to go.
     
    Me, Dec 13, 2010
    #2
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  3. If you are recording a distant view for subsequent stitching,
    take all you shots in portrait mode.

    While you will have to take more images to achieve your 360°,
    portarait modeproides a greater area of foreground or of sky than
    taking the same scene in landscape mode.
     
    Lindsay.Rollo@paradisedotnetdotnz, Dec 13, 2010
    #3
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