Re: Opinions on "Carbonite"?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BobS, Sep 19, 2009.

  1. BobS

    BobS Guest

    "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    news:4ab4206c$0$25346$...
    > I'm looking for a backup solution that's more effective than either a
    > external HD or optical, and would like to locate my files off-site.
    > Does anyone have experience with Carbonite's service?
    >
    > http://www.carbonite.com/
    >
    > Then offer a flat fee for unlimited quantities, which is what I need
    > for the hundreds of gigs of photos. Does anyone out there use them?
    > If so, are they any good?
    >
    > TIA...

    Bowser,

    I can't speak to the reliability / availability of the Carbonite site
    or others offering this type of service. But after 30 years in the
    computer and communication field, the most effective solution - is a
    backup computer that is under your control. Your speed is limited to
    your ISP limits and some ISP's do not allow constant streaming as would
    be needed for you to transfer all those files. The time needed to
    transfer 100's of gigs is going to be measured in days - not hours for
    your initial backup. Plus, if something happens to their hardware or
    business model, what happens to your data?

    You can go with a low-cost system or even an older system that would be
    dedicated to storing backup's only. This can be automated using the
    Windows Home Server (WHS) OS ($160) and offers many features for
    backing up and storing your files as well as performing media serving
    duties. To many features for me to list here but certainly worth
    looking at especially with 100's of gig's.

    The next solution would be a NAS (Network Attached Storage) with many
    options available and works at network speed as would the WHS solution.
    A decent NAS with a RAID capability is around $300 plus drives.


    You want off-site backup. Backup to a eSATA (external SATA hard drive)
    which allows you to transfer at bus speeds. When done, take that drive
    to your bank and put it in a safe deposit box. Connect the second eSata
    drive to your system and allow your backup software to make incremental
    backups for a week. Now swap the drives from off-site and continue
    this process. Fast, efficient, relatively low cost and totally under
    your control. The drive at the bank is usually in a fire-proof safe,
    etc.

    Key point here is that a number of business models have come and gone
    that provided these services and about the only ones that survive are
    the ones that service the enterprise level. The low cost sounds great
    until ...... stuff happens. Keep it under your control.

    Bob S.
     
    BobS, Sep 19, 2009
    #1
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  2. BobS

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 19 Sep 2009 00:14:16 -0400, "BobS" <> wrote:
    :
    : "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    : news:4ab4206c$0$25346$...
    : > I'm looking for a backup solution that's more effective than either a
    : > external HD or optical, and would like to locate my files off-site.
    : > Does anyone have experience with Carbonite's service?
    : >
    : > http://www.carbonite.com/
    : >
    : > Then offer a flat fee for unlimited quantities, which is what I need
    : > for the hundreds of gigs of photos. Does anyone out there use them?
    : > If so, are they any good?
    : >
    : > TIA...
    : Bowser,
    :
    : I can't speak to the reliability / availability of the Carbonite site
    : or others offering this type of service. But after 30 years in the
    : computer and communication field, the most effective solution - is a
    : backup computer that is under your control. Your speed is limited to
    : your ISP limits and some ISP's do not allow constant streaming as would
    : be needed for you to transfer all those files. The time needed to
    : transfer 100's of gigs is going to be measured in days - not hours for
    : your initial backup. Plus, if something happens to their hardware or
    : business model, what happens to your data?
    :
    : You can go with a low-cost system or even an older system that would be
    : dedicated to storing backup's only. This can be automated using the
    : Windows Home Server (WHS) OS ($160) and offers many features for
    : backing up and storing your files as well as performing media serving
    : duties. To many features for me to list here but certainly worth
    : looking at especially with 100's of gig's.
    :
    : The next solution would be a NAS (Network Attached Storage) with many
    : options available and works at network speed as would the WHS solution.
    : A decent NAS with a RAID capability is around $300 plus drives.
    :
    :
    : You want off-site backup. Backup to a eSATA (external SATA hard drive)
    : which allows you to transfer at bus speeds. When done, take that drive
    : to your bank and put it in a safe deposit box. Connect the second eSata
    : drive to your system and allow your backup software to make incremental
    : backups for a week. Now swap the drives from off-site and continue
    : this process. Fast, efficient, relatively low cost and totally under
    : your control. The drive at the bank is usually in a fire-proof safe,
    : etc.
    :
    : Key point here is that a number of business models have come and gone
    : that provided these services and about the only ones that survive are
    : the ones that service the enterprise level. The low cost sounds great
    : until ...... stuff happens. Keep it under your control.

    I agree almost completely. The only point I'd add is that almost all of the
    benefit of off-site storage comes from having one or more copies properly
    distributed, not from placing your backup media in a fireproof safe.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 20, 2009
    #2
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  3. BobS

    BobS Guest


    >
    > I agree almost completely. The only point I'd add is that almost all
    > of the
    > benefit of off-site storage comes from having one or more copies
    > properly
    > distributed, not from placing your backup media in a fireproof safe.
    >
    > Bob


    Robert,

    Perhaps I didn't make that point clear but yes, two or more drives are
    required depending on your rotation or if you're doing a full back-up
    or an incremental scenario.

    If WHS (Windows Home Server - it's actually W2K3) is used, a person
    travelling can easily access any files on his home server just as he
    could using any other service. Use the pay for or free DNS service
    that allows you to give your home IP address a friendly name and the
    DNS service will always direct your connection to the correct IP
    address should you not have a static IP address.

    If someone thinks that their data is important enough to backup and
    wants to reach it from anywhere - a home server is a great idea. If
    you don't like the idea of having to store a hard drive off-site, buy a
    small fire proof safe - large enough for a couple of hard drives and
    use that.

    Do not give up control of your data if you ever want to see it again -
    odd's are against you.

    Lastly, you do not need to be a nerd to put together a decent system to
    do this and it does not need to be expensive. There are off-the-shelf
    systems readily available from HP and others. Educate yourself and
    you'll be a lot better off if your files are important to you.

    Google "Windows Home Server".

    Bob S.
     
    BobS, Sep 21, 2009
    #3
  4. BobS

    Bowser Guest

    "BobS" <> wrote in message
    news:h91lqb$avg$-september.org...
    >
    > "Bowser" <> wrote in message
    > news:4ab4206c$0$25346$...
    >> I'm looking for a backup solution that's more effective than either a
    >> external HD or optical, and would like to locate my files off-site. Does
    >> anyone have experience with Carbonite's service?
    >>
    >> http://www.carbonite.com/
    >>
    >> Then offer a flat fee for unlimited quantities, which is what I need for
    >> the hundreds of gigs of photos. Does anyone out there use them? If so,
    >> are they any good?
    >>
    >> TIA...

    > Bowser,
    >
    > I can't speak to the reliability / availability of the Carbonite site or
    > others offering this type of service. But after 30 years in the computer
    > and communication field, the most effective solution - is a backup
    > computer that is under your control. Your speed is limited to your ISP
    > limits and some ISP's do not allow constant streaming as would be needed
    > for you to transfer all those files. The time needed to transfer 100's of
    > gigs is going to be measured in days - not hours for your initial backup.
    > Plus, if something happens to their hardware or business model, what
    > happens to your data?
    >
    > You can go with a low-cost system or even an older system that would be
    > dedicated to storing backup's only. This can be automated using the
    > Windows Home Server (WHS) OS ($160) and offers many features for backing
    > up and storing your files as well as performing media serving duties. To
    > many features for me to list here but certainly worth looking at
    > especially with 100's of gig's.
    >
    > The next solution would be a NAS (Network Attached Storage) with many
    > options available and works at network speed as would the WHS solution. A
    > decent NAS with a RAID capability is around $300 plus drives.
    >
    >
    > You want off-site backup. Backup to a eSATA (external SATA hard drive)
    > which allows you to transfer at bus speeds. When done, take that drive to
    > your bank and put it in a safe deposit box. Connect the second eSata drive
    > to your system and allow your backup software to make incremental backups
    > for a week. Now swap the drives from off-site and continue this process.
    > Fast, efficient, relatively low cost and totally under your control. The
    > drive at the bank is usually in a fire-proof safe, etc.


    I'm on the road a bit, and swapping drives back and forth to a bank won't
    happen. I'll never do it.

    >
    > Key point here is that a number of business models have come and gone that
    > provided these services and about the only ones that survive are the ones
    > that service the enterprise level. The low cost sounds great until ......
    > stuff happens. Keep it under your control.


    True enough, that's why I'm looking for the most stable provider. Worst
    case, I need to switch to another on-line service if my provider goes out of
    business. The only problem would be if my drive crashed at the same time as
    my provider disappearing. Pretty unlikely, though.
     
    Bowser, Sep 21, 2009
    #4
  5. BobS

    me Guest

    On Mon, 21 Sep 2009 09:23:02 -0400, Giftzwerg
    <> wrote:

    >
    >And none of them are. Sorry, but this scheme is unworkable for the
    >oldest reason known to mankind; laziness. Nobody is going to schlep an
    >external drive back and forth to his bank.



    Change bank to work and this is the solution I use.
     
    me, Sep 21, 2009
    #5
  6. BobS <> wrote:

    > If WHS (Windows Home Server - it's actually W2K3) is used, a person
    > travelling can easily access any files on his home server just as he
    > could using any other service.


    Download speed from home server: Uplink of your home server's
    connection. If you have an asymetric connection there (most
    consumer DSL for example is ADSL) you have high download speeds
    at the expense of upload speed --- and thus slow service while
    travelling.

    Download speed from internet service: usually whatever your local
    connection can download, i.e. often 10 times faster.

    Then comes the fun of making Windows (if you use it) actually safe
    for the Internet, but that's another story for a long, slow decade.

    > Do not give up control of your data if you ever want to see it again -
    > odd's are against you.


    Huh?

    > Google "Windows Home Server".


    Google >"Windows Home Server" Exploits<

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Sep 23, 2009
    #6
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