Re: No emission multifunction?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by VanguardLH, Jul 4, 2010.

  1. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Jane Galt wrote:

    > I have a Canon MF3240 and have been getting sick when it prints a lot of
    > pages, despite arranging the room and air cleaner to minimize the emissions
    > that I have to breathe.
    >
    > I emailed Canon about it and they just deny everything. BS.
    >
    > http://www.inspiredliving.com/airpura-airpurifiers/laser-printers-
    > airpollution.htm
    >
    > So does anyone know a multifunction ( I need at least a workhorse laser
    > printer and flatbed scanner ) that has no emissions?


    http://www.howstuffworks.com/laser-printer.htm
    Section 2: Static Electricity

    Notice that the carbon is statically attracted to the paper. Well, just
    like spray painting of cars, not all the mist happens to settle on the
    target. You'll notice that the folks doing the spraying always wear
    masks (and usually not the cheap cloth filter ones you buy for a couple
    bucks in a multi-pack). Unless you want to wear a purifier mask, you
    could try putting the laser printer inside a sound-proof housing that
    has filters on its exhaust ports (and uses a fan on an intake port to
    ensure the heat gets exhausted through the filter).

    You say that you get sick WHILE using the laser printer. The effects of
    carbon particle emission and its pollution is accumulative and would not
    effect you immediately. If you got sick, you would REMAIN sick due to
    lung disease. Perhaps to what you are sensitive are the ions generated
    by the corona wire; however, it is just as likely that your air purifier
    is also generating ionic emission. Ions can irritate the throat and
    lungs. It is a gimmick to make airborne particles stick together and by
    their combined weight will drop onto your carpet, beds, and furniture
    (where they get raised again when you walk or use them). It is also a
    gimmick to trick your nostrils into thinking the air is fresher because
    of the smell. You never mentioned WHICH air purifier you use. If it
    has an ionic cleaning function that can be turned off then turn it off,
    or it is just one of those crappy ion sticks that only uses ionic flow
    then just leave it completely off when you're around.

    You use your air purifier while using your laser printer. There are now
    2 possible sources of pollution. If you were getting sick from the
    "second-hand smoke" of non-captured carbon particles during the static
    phase of the laser printer, you would be sick and stay sick. It
    wouldn't come and go to be present only when you happened to use the
    laser printer. Miners that get coal lung don't just get sick when they
    happen to enter the mine. Looks like your "solution" is making you
    sick. Likely is that your purifier generates the ions that irritate
    your throat or lungs.

    Ozone is a powerful lung irritant. It is possible the air cleaner you
    use is generating the emissions that are making you sick. Many air
    cleaners end up causing more problems than they solve, especially any
    that produce ions.
     
    VanguardLH, Jul 4, 2010
    #1
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  2. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Jane Galt wrote:

    > VanguardLH <> wrote :
    >
    >> Jane Galt wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a Canon MF3240 and have been getting sick when it prints a lot
    >>> of pages, despite arranging the room and air cleaner to minimize the
    >>> emissions that I have to breathe.
    >>>
    >>> I emailed Canon about it and they just deny everything. BS.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.inspiredliving.com/airpura-airpurifiers/laser-printers-
    >>> airpollution.htm
    >>>
    >>> So does anyone know a multifunction ( I need at least a workhorse laser
    >>> printer and flatbed scanner ) that has no emissions?

    >>
    >> http://www.howstuffworks.com/laser-printer.htm
    >> Section 2: Static Electricity
    >>
    >> Notice that the carbon is statically attracted to the paper. Well, just
    >> like spray painting of cars, not all the mist happens to settle on the
    >> target. You'll notice that the folks doing the spraying always wear
    >> masks (and usually not the cheap cloth filter ones you buy for a couple
    >> bucks in a multi-pack). Unless you want to wear a purifier mask, you
    >> could try putting the laser printer inside a sound-proof housing that
    >> has filters on its exhaust ports (and uses a fan on an intake port to
    >> ensure the heat gets exhausted through the filter).

    >
    >> You say that you get sick WHILE using the laser printer. The effects of
    >> carbon particle emission and its pollution is accumulative and would not
    >> effect you immediately.

    >
    > It has something to do with the heated fumes from the toner. They make me
    > cough for awhile after, several hours. So it may not be particles but may
    > be something from the toner being heated, causing gases?
    >
    >> If you got sick, you would REMAIN sick due to
    >> lung disease. Perhaps to what you are sensitive are the ions generated
    >> by the corona wire; however, it is just as likely that your air purifier
    >> is also generating ionic emission.

    >
    > Nope, Austin HM400 with HEPA and 17 lbs of carbon.
    >
    > But some of these articles appear to be saying that there are some printers
    > that have no emissions. If that's true, I'm looking for a multifunction
    > that doesnt.


    Not with laser printers. You have the corona wire that creates ions.
    You have the carbon dust which may not all settle on the paper. And you
    have the glue in the toner that gets heated to affix the carbon to the
    paper. Have you looked around at a printer sound-proofing cabinet where
    you can put inside your laser printer? Without any circulation, the
    fumes would stay inside but you would have to monitor the air
    temperature inside to ensure it was within operating range for the laser
    printer. Of course, when you go to open the cabinet to remove your
    paper, you'll inhale the fumes unless you are wearing a mask. Of
    course, you could use something like a dryer vent. The cabinet has an
    intake of fresh air (from the room) but the exhaust gets vented outside.

    Considering how laser printers work, there will be emissions. So it's a
    question of how you will manage them, like exhausting them to the
    outside. I haven't bothered to investigate if there are emissions from
    inkjet printers which do not rely on a static charge to pull the ink to
    the paper or use heat to affix it to the paper. Of course, there is
    solvent in the inks for an inkjet printer which would be on the paper
    hence why it takes time for the ink to dry on the paper.

    Other than encapsulating the printer with an enclosure that exhausts the
    emissions from a laser printer (carbon dust, ions, or thermal glue) or
    from an inkjet printer (ink solvent), and which is how such emissions
    are probably handled in environments that are super-sensitive to such
    pollutants, it seems you're stuck with having to wear a full-face filter
    mask (covers both eyes, nose, and mouth). I don't recall every seeing a
    100% sealed printer whether laser or inkjet. As a matter of fact, the
    heated paper with the carbon will have the solvent for the thermal glue
    and the printed paper ejected by an inkjet printer will have the solvent
    used for its ink. They will both have a smell simply because of the
    solvents present on the ejected paper that you want to produce with the
    printing.


    Building a printer enclosure yourself wouldn't be very difficult. Some
    plywood, plexiglass, hinges, screws, and rubber gaskets would work along
    with an intake fan. You can get vinyl dryer vent hoses (rather than use
    the metal tubes). Putting in the dryer vent in the wall of your house
    would be the hard part; however, you could simply use some plywood,
    drill a hole, attach the dryer hose to it, and lift a window and let it
    sit down on the plywood (with is wide enough to fit the window) to
    exhaust the fumes that way, similar to how a window fan fits in the
    window frame. You're still stuck, however, with the fumes emitted by
    the printing on the paper with the printing that want generated. Of
    course, you could leave the paper sitting in the output tray for many
    minutes to let dry the thermal glue or inkjet solvents and get exhausted
    to the outside.
     
    VanguardLH, Jul 5, 2010
    #2
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  3. VanguardLH

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-07-05, Jane Galt <> wrote:

    [...]

    > Ok, well what about inkjets then? Are they up to the same kinds of speeds
    > that lasers are? Like 20PPM and just as stable ink? Do they come in
    > "workhorse" type multifunctions for SOHO where someone could print a few
    > thousand pages a month without trashing them fast?


    Inkjets work out very expensive to run, and you'd have to shop around to
    find which ones use ink that dries 'waterproof'. If you have trouble with
    fumes from laser-printer toners, you'd probably have trouble with the
    solvent fumes from non-water-based inkjet ink.

    It sounds as though you print enough to justify a 'printer room' with its
    own extractor fan (down-wind from the air intake for the room you work
    in). But a 'printer cabinet' as already described would be almost as
    effective. There used to be commercial models, back when impact printers
    were the norm, so you might be find one that could be converted to vent
    the fumes outdoors - you might want to strip out the sound insulation, in
    case it isn't fire-resistant and to prevent it from accumulating whatever
    it is you're reacting to.

    Modern furnishings often 'outgas' unpleasant stuff from synthetic
    materials, which may be part of your problem. Ventilation is the obvious
    answer, and leafy house-plants can help too - search the web for

    Houseplants That Clean the Air

    for suggestions. NASA have done some useful research in this area.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Jul 5, 2010
    #3
  4. VanguardLH

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jul 2010 18:41:31 -0500, VanguardLH ÇʇoɹÊ:

    > Not with laser printers. You have the corona wire that creates ions.
    > You have the carbon dust which may not all settle on the paper. And you
    > have the glue in the toner that gets heated to affix the carbon to the
    > paper. Have you looked around at a printer sound-proofing cabinet where
    > you can put inside your laser printer? Without any circulation, the
    > fumes would stay inside but you would have to monitor the air
    > temperature inside to ensure it was within operating range for the laser
    > printer.


    You can't close up a laser printer.
     
    Meat Plow, Jul 5, 2010
    #4
  5. VanguardLH

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jul 2010 22:18:31 -0500, Jane Galt ÇʇoɹÊ:

    > VanguardLH <> wrote :
    >
    >
    >> Not with laser printers. You have the corona wire that creates ions.
    >> You have the carbon dust which may not all settle on the paper. And
    >> you have the glue in the toner that gets heated to affix the carbon to
    >> the paper. Have you looked around at a printer sound-proofing cabinet
    >> where you can put inside your laser printer? Without any circulation,
    >> the fumes would stay inside but you would have to monitor the air
    >> temperature inside to ensure it was within operating range for the
    >> laser printer. Of course, when you go to open the cabinet to remove
    >> your paper, you'll inhale the fumes unless you are wearing a mask. Of
    >> course, you could use something like a dryer vent. The cabinet has an
    >> intake of fresh air (from the room) but the exhaust gets vented
    >> outside.
    >>

    > ...
    >
    >
    > Ok, well what about inkjets then? Are they up to the same kinds of
    > speeds that lasers are? Like 20PPM and just as stable ink? Do they come
    > in "workhorse" type multifunctions for SOHO where someone could print a
    > few thousand pages a month without trashing them fast?


    You may find a business class inkjet but you're probably allergic to the
    fumes the ink makes as it dries on the paper. Injkjets have too many
    moving parts to stand up to a lot of usage, the ink is expensive, and the
    way printing is done is a lot slower than laser.

    A better solution would be to build a separate printing/copying room with
    an exhaust fan and air filtration. Maybe even a HAZMAT suit?
     
    Meat Plow, Jul 5, 2010
    #5
  6. VanguardLH

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2010 00:31:58 -0500, Jane Galt ÇʇoɹÊ:

    > Jane Galt <> wrote :
    >
    >
    >
    >> Ok, well what about inkjets then? Are they up to the same kinds of
    >> speeds that lasers are? Like 20PPM and just as stable ink? Do they come
    >> in "workhorse" type multifunctions for SOHO where someone could print a
    >> few thousand pages a month without trashing them fast?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Jeez, doing some looking around. Inkjets only get 300 pages from a
    > cartridge?
    >
    > Whoa!


    http://www.globalnerdy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/hazmat_suit.jpg
     
    Meat Plow, Jul 5, 2010
    #6
  7. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Jane Galt wrote:

    > Whiskers <> wrote :
    >
    >> On 2010-07-05, Jane Galt <> wrote:
    >>
    >> [...]
    >>
    >>> Ok, well what about inkjets then? Are they up to the same kinds of speeds
    >>> that lasers are? Like 20PPM and just as stable ink? Do they come in
    >>> "workhorse" type multifunctions for SOHO where someone could print a few
    >>> thousand pages a month without trashing them fast?

    >>
    >> Inkjets work out very expensive to run, and you'd have to shop around to
    >> find which ones use ink that dries 'waterproof'. If you have trouble with
    >> fumes from laser-printer toners, you'd probably have trouble with the
    >> solvent fumes from non-water-based inkjet ink.
    >>
    >> It sounds as though you print enough to justify a 'printer room' with its
    >> own extractor fan (down-wind from the air intake for the room you work
    >> in). But a 'printer cabinet' as already described would be almost as
    >> effective. There used to be commercial models, back when impact printers
    >> were the norm, so you might be find one that could be converted to vent
    >> the fumes outdoors - you might want to strip out the sound insulation, in
    >> case it isn't fire-resistant and to prevent it from accumulating whatever
    >> it is you're reacting to.
    >>
    >> Modern furnishings often 'outgas' unpleasant stuff from synthetic
    >> materials, which may be part of your problem. Ventilation is the obvious
    >> answer, and leafy house-plants can help too - search the web for

    >
    > That's actually why we have the three HM400's in the house. They work very
    > well for most things, but it appears that having a laser printer in the house
    > is like having someone smoking.


    Carbon-impregnated filters are not going to remove solvents from the
    air. They remove particulates over a certain size. That's why it has
    been suggested that you enclose the offending source and exhaust the air
    to the outside.

    You mentioned using a HEPA air purifier. And how is that going to
    remove *smells* from the air? HEPA removes particulates. Read:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HEPA

    These filters, ionic, and other types remove particles from the air.
    They do NOT remove gases anymore than they would remove oxygen (which
    obviously would have you suffocate). The activated charcoal attempts to
    absorb some gases (and why you eventually have to replace the filter to
    get new activated charcoal/carbon that hasn't reacted yet besides
    replacing the dirty paper portion with all the particles stuck in it)
    but it isn't going to react with every gas.

    Spray a rag with brake cleaner. Put it on the intake side of your HEPA
    filter. You really think you aren't going to smell the brake cleaner's
    solvent (variable composition of heptane, toluene, xylene, isopropyl
    alcohol, acetone, naptha, propane, and [ethyl]benzene)?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Activated_carbon

    If the fouling gas doesn't react with the carbon, there's no bond so it
    doesn't get trapped. Also, since we aren't talking about pressurized
    air filtration systems, a lot of solvents just aren't going to get
    absorbed.

    Also, an air purifier that is moving the air around in a room is not
    taking in air from a separate source and exhausting it only into a
    different room. That same purifier is moving ALL the air around in the
    room. A smell that might reside only around the printer while it was
    being used and is far away from you will have that small moved all over
    the room by the air flow through the purifier. Moving the air around
    doesn't have all the air move only through the purifier. If someone
    farts in a corner and you're in the opposite corner of the room, they
    might get away with the act. But put a fan, or even an air purifier, in
    the room that is moving all the air around and it'll just be a few
    seconds before you realize the nasty deed. You aren't taking just
    cleaned air and moving it around. Just look at the example they use for
    the Oreck air filter. They dust up a chamber and show how fast the
    stuff gets removed. However, if YOU are inside that chamber and the
    dust was added on one side, it'll be everywhere during the cleaning
    cycle including you on the other side of the chamber until the air has
    been cycled several times through the filter. You'll be suffering in
    the interim until the air gets cleaned. A cleanroom doesn't use a room
    filter. It introduces the cleaned air into the room, not try to move
    around the filth hoping to clean it up before it contaminates something.
    You have to make sure the contaminants don't get introduced into the
    cleanroom so that removing any that occur is quick. No cleanroom is
    going to plop a room purifier in the middle of the cleanroom and expect
    there to be no contaminants during the cleaning cycle.

    It'll be awhile AFTER you do your printing before the polluted air has
    reached your air purifier and before that same volume of air has been
    cycled enough times through the filter to get rid of the contaminants.
    Room purifiers are nice for when you enter a room where its air has been
    cleaned. It will NOT get rid of gases and odors that you currently
    being generated until some time has elapsed to actually process the
    entire room's volume of air through the filter and probably more than
    once. If you don't want to smell the printer odor, you're going to have
    to exhaust it outside or into its own air purifier intake. That doesn't
    mean putting the purifier next to the printer. That means putting the
    printer inside its own cabinet, having an intake port, and making sure
    that there is negative pressure inside due to the forced exhaust of the
    cabinet's air into the outside (or into a purifier if you're going to
    dump the exhausted air back into your room).

    Do you have one of these filters in your kitchen? When you cook fish,
    is there absolutely no smell of the cooking odors? Yes, of course there
    is. It will be sometime before that room filter cycles enough of the
    air volume and enough repeats before that fish smell is gone. Why would
    you expect any different for gases effused from your printer? It's
    going to take time to filter out the unwanted smell assuming that the
    gas is a type that will react with carbon (since the paper filtering is
    obviously never going to block the smell).
     
    VanguardLH, Jul 6, 2010
    #7
  8. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Jane Galt wrote:

    > And I cant afford to build a vent right over it, so I guess I can just
    > leave the room for 5 minutes when it prints a lot of sheets and let it get
    > cleaned up by the filter.


    I'll assume that it's not your house so cutting a hole through the wall
    to put in a dryer vent is not an option. Dryer vents are cheap but I
    presumed that you already had the tools to cut the hole through the
    siding and interior wall.

    http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-P...For-Laundry-Rooms/how-to-install-a-dryer-vent

    Any good at nailing wood planks together or gluing and screwing plywood?
    Build a cabinet for the printer with a common computer fan for exhaust
    and put the exhaust port right next to the intake of your air purifier.
    As another poster mentioned, you could use a sound-deadening cabinet (a
    used one to stay on the cheap) and use a hole saw to add an exhaust
    port.

    A printer cabinet doesn't have to be anything fancy. If the printer
    fits, you could use an old metal filing cabinet and some silicon to
    fashion the gasket seals. Then use a tin snips for intake and exhaust
    ports. Screw on a 80mm fan (any computer store has them for cheap) at
    the height where your air filter takes in air, or put the air filter in
    the other filing cabinet's drawer (for a 2-drawer unit). There are lot
    of box structures you could fashion as a "printer cabinet". You might
    even already have a desk with a filing drawer where within the printer
    would fit and you could hang a small good air filter (so you don't get a
    blast of smell when you open the filing drawer).

    How about just buying some plexiglass and gluing it together in a box?
    The home shop will probably cut it for you to the sizes you need for all
    sides of the clear box. Make it big enough to put the printer inside
    along with a small but good air filter. It doesn't even have to be a
    full box: just the top and sides. Leave off the bottom so you can just
    lift the box to get at your printouts (or use a piano hinge to make a
    door you lift up. Heck, you could just use a cardboard box for now that
    fits over the printer and air filter. You'll probably want to watch the
    temperature inside to determine if you need to vent in fresh air (from
    the room) and exhaust it out after going through the air filter.

    Got a closet? Got a good air purifier that you could put in the closet
    along with the printer? It's only cleaning the air inside the closet so
    you don't need a huge capacity air purifier but will need one which the
    active carbon to remove the gases/smells produced by the printer. I
    wouldn't recommend leaving any clothes in that closet since the odor
    might get into them (and no air filter can suck out the smell once
    trapped in fabrics).
     
    VanguardLH, Jul 6, 2010
    #8
  9. VanguardLH

    OldGringo38 Guest

    On 7/6/2010 12:11 AM Just to please that super-ego, Jane Galt wrote the
    following tidbit of information:
    > VanguardLH<> wrote :
    >
    >> Jane Galt wrote:
    >>
    >>> And I cant afford to build a vent right over it, so I guess I can just
    >>> leave the room for 5 minutes when it prints a lot of sheets and let it
    >>> get cleaned up by the filter.

    >>
    >> I'll assume that it's not your house so cutting a hole through the wall
    >> to put in a dryer vent is not an option.

    >
    > It is my house but the printer is on an office desk in the middle of the
    > room, so I'd have to bring down a kitchen style hood over it ( or build a
    > cabinet around it with a vent hood on top ) and have a fan in it wired to
    > go on every time the printer runs, and maybe for a minute after. And that
    > may not be so great when I'm on the phone for a business call.
    >
    >> Dryer vents are cheap but I
    >> presumed that you already had the tools to cut the hole through the
    >> siding and interior wall.
    >>
    >> http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Indoor-Projects/Laundry-Room/D
    >> IY-Tips-For-Laundry-Rooms/how-to-install-a-dryer-vent
    >>
    >> Any good at nailing wood planks together or gluing and screwing plywood?
    >> Build a cabinet for the printer with a common computer fan for exhaust
    >> and put the exhaust port right next to the intake of your air purifier.
    >> As another poster mentioned, you could use a sound-deadening cabinet (a
    >> used one to stay on the cheap) and use a hole saw to add an exhaust
    >> port.
    >>
    >> A printer cabinet doesn't have to be anything fancy. If the printer
    >> fits, you could use an old metal filing cabinet and some silicon to
    >> fashion the gasket seals. Then use a tin snips for intake and exhaust
    >> ports. Screw on a 80mm fan (any computer store has them for cheap) at
    >> the height where your air filter takes in air, or put the air filter in
    >> the other filing cabinet's drawer (for a 2-drawer unit). There are lot
    >> of box structures you could fashion as a "printer cabinet". You might
    >> even already have a desk with a filing drawer where within the printer
    >> would fit and you could hang a small good air filter (so you don't get a
    >> blast of smell when you open the filing drawer).
    >>
    >> How about just buying some plexiglass and gluing it together in a box?
    >> The home shop will probably cut it for you to the sizes you need for all
    >> sides of the clear box. Make it big enough to put the printer inside
    >> along with a small but good air filter. It doesn't even have to be a
    >> full box: just the top and sides. Leave off the bottom so you can just
    >> lift the box to get at your printouts (or use a piano hinge to make a
    >> door you lift up. Heck, you could just use a cardboard box for now that
    >> fits over the printer and air filter. You'll probably want to watch the
    >> temperature inside to determine if you need to vent in fresh air (from
    >> the room) and exhaust it out after going through the air filter.
    >>
    >> Got a closet? Got a good air purifier that you could put in the closet
    >> along with the printer? It's only cleaning the air inside the closet so
    >> you don't need a huge capacity air purifier but will need one which the
    >> active carbon to remove the gases/smells produced by the printer. I
    >> wouldn't recommend leaving any clothes in that closet since the odor
    >> might get into them (and no air filter can suck out the smell once
    >> trapped in fabrics).

    >
    > These are all interesting options to consider and I thank you for taking
    > the time to detail them out like that. :)
    >

    Jane; try one of these and you can put it in the garage or out on the patio:
    http://www.google.com/products?hl=e...esult_group&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CD4QrQQwAA

    --
    OldGringo38
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
     
    OldGringo38, Jul 6, 2010
    #9
  10. VanguardLH

    OldGringo38 Guest

    On 7/6/2010 5:49 PM Just to please that super-ego, Jane Galt wrote the
    following tidbit of information:
    > OldGringo38<> wrote :
    >
    >> On 7/6/2010 12:11 AM Just to please that super-ego, Jane Galt wrote the
    >> following tidbit of information:
    >>> VanguardLH<> wrote :
    >>>
    >>>> Jane Galt wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> And I cant afford to build a vent right over it, so I guess I can
    >>>>> just leave the room for 5 minutes when it prints a lot of sheets and
    >>>>> let it get cleaned up by the filter.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'll assume that it's not your house so cutting a hole through the
    >>>> wall to put in a dryer vent is not an option.
    >>>
    >>> It is my house but the printer is on an office desk in the middle of
    >>> the room, so I'd have to bring down a kitchen style hood over it ( or
    >>> build a cabinet around it with a vent hood on top ) and have a fan in
    >>> it wired to go on every time the printer runs, and maybe for a minute
    >>> after. And that may not be so great when I'm on the phone for a
    >>> business call.
    >>>
    >>>> Dryer vents are cheap but I
    >>>> presumed that you already had the tools to cut the hole through the
    >>>> siding and interior wall.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Indoor-Projects/Laundry-Room
    >>>> /D IY-Tips-For-Laundry-Rooms/how-to-install-a-dryer-vent
    >>>>
    >>>> Any good at nailing wood planks together or gluing and screwing
    >>>> plywood? Build a cabinet for the printer with a common computer fan
    >>>> for exhaust and put the exhaust port right next to the intake of your
    >>>> air purifier. As another poster mentioned, you could use a
    >>>> sound-deadening cabinet (a used one to stay on the cheap) and use a
    >>>> hole saw to add an exhaust port.
    >>>>
    >>>> A printer cabinet doesn't have to be anything fancy. If the printer
    >>>> fits, you could use an old metal filing cabinet and some silicon to
    >>>> fashion the gasket seals. Then use a tin snips for intake and exhaust
    >>>> ports. Screw on a 80mm fan (any computer store has them for cheap) at
    >>>> the height where your air filter takes in air, or put the air filter
    >>>> in the other filing cabinet's drawer (for a 2-drawer unit). There are
    >>>> lot of box structures you could fashion as a "printer cabinet". You
    >>>> might even already have a desk with a filing drawer where within the
    >>>> printer would fit and you could hang a small good air filter (so you
    >>>> don't get a blast of smell when you open the filing drawer).
    >>>>
    >>>> How about just buying some plexiglass and gluing it together in a box?
    >>>> The home shop will probably cut it for you to the sizes you need for
    >>>> all sides of the clear box. Make it big enough to put the printer
    >>>> inside along with a small but good air filter. It doesn't even have
    >>>> to be a full box: just the top and sides. Leave off the bottom so you
    >>>> can just lift the box to get at your printouts (or use a piano hinge
    >>>> to make a door you lift up. Heck, you could just use a cardboard box
    >>>> for now that fits over the printer and air filter. You'll probably
    >>>> want to watch the temperature inside to determine if you need to vent
    >>>> in fresh air (from the room) and exhaust it out after going through
    >>>> the air filter.
    >>>>
    >>>> Got a closet? Got a good air purifier that you could put in the
    >>>> closet along with the printer? It's only cleaning the air inside the
    >>>> closet so you don't need a huge capacity air purifier but will need
    >>>> one which the active carbon to remove the gases/smells produced by the
    >>>> printer. I wouldn't recommend leaving any clothes in that closet
    >>>> since the odor might get into them (and no air filter can suck out the
    >>>> smell once trapped in fabrics).
    >>>
    >>> These are all interesting options to consider and I thank you for
    >>> taking the time to detail them out like that. :)
    >>>

    >> Jane; try one of these and you can put it in the garage or out on the
    >> patio:
    >> http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q=WiFi all in one laser printer&um=1
    >> &ie=UTF-8&ei=BL0yTNDNDoeglAfkkK2_Cw&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title
    >> &resnum=1&ved=0CD4QrQQwAA
    >>

    >
    > Or under the vent hood in the kitchen, on the stovetop. LOL
    >

    I'm sure there is a solution to your situation, just got to find the
    right one. Clinton Valley Center could have been one.

    --
    OldGringo38
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
     
    OldGringo38, Jul 6, 2010
    #10
    1. Advertising

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