Re: NiMh voltage?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David Taylor, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. David Taylor

    David Taylor Guest

    On 22/10/2013 15:26, bugbear wrote:
    > I have a (old) Canon A630 camera.
    >
    > I can get very few shots/use out of a freshly charged set of
    > NiMh AA batteries, and yet when I put them in a halogen
    > bulb torch, the torch will run for hours.
    >
    > I assume it's related to voltage, not Ah capacity.
    >
    > Do brands/models of NiMh battery vary in voltage,
    > and (if so) can anyone recommend a high(er) voltage type?
    >
    > BugBear


    It's possible that the camera has a higher current drain, or has
    developed a fault causing same. You could try with a fresh set of
    batteries, or even non-rechargeables. How old are the NiMH cells - they
    don't last for ever. I bought fresh Sanyo eneloops after 3-4 years
    use. The voltage is likely dependent on the chemistry, and unlikely to
    vary a lot between brands.

    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Oct 22, 2013
    #1
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  2. David Taylor

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    PAM says...
    >
    > "David Taylor" <> wrote in message
    > news:l4648f$ekg$...
    > > On 22/10/2013 15:26, bugbear wrote:
    > >> I have a (old) Canon A630 camera.
    > >>
    > >> I can get very few shots/use out of a freshly charged set of
    > >> NiMh AA batteries, and yet when I put them in a halogen
    > >> bulb torch, the torch will run for hours.
    > >>
    > >> I assume it's related to voltage, not Ah capacity.
    > >>
    > >> Do brands/models of NiMh battery vary in voltage,
    > >> and (if so) can anyone recommend a high(er) voltage type?
    > >>
    > >> BugBear

    > >
    > > It's possible that the camera has a higher current drain, or has developed
    > > a fault causing same. You could try with a fresh set of batteries, or
    > > even non-rechargeables. How old are the NiMH cells - they don't last for
    > > ever. I bought fresh Sanyo eneloops after 3-4 years use. The voltage is
    > > likely dependent on the chemistry, and unlikely to vary a lot between
    > > brands.
    > >
    > >

    > I have--on occasion--used a Canon A560 camera, which uses two AA size
    > batteries.
    >
    > With NiMH, after about four or five photos using automatic flash, it is
    > already showing Low Battery. I get about ten to fifteen more photos maximum
    > and then I have to change batteries. This is with Lenmar 2000 mAh NiMH
    > batteries. I also have some Lenmar 2400 mAh NiMH batteries that give a
    > little longer battery usage.
    >
    > Alkaline batteries actually give even more photos that NiMH. Maybe I get ten
    > or so photos before Low Battery and about twenty five to thirty more photos
    > before I have to change batteries.
    >
    > I haven't tried those Lithium type AA batteries, though they are marketed as
    > being suitable for higher drain devices.
    >
    > I think it's just that the LCD screen draws a lot of current. Also, I think
    > Canon may have made the Low Battery indicator too soon in general. This
    > battery drain isn't nearly as noticable when using just the optical
    > viewfinder with the LCD screen off.


    If you google "A560 NiMH Problem" you'll find numerous reports of what
    you are seeing. Again it seems to be a mechanical issue with the
    battery contacts. Some have reported succcess by cleaning them with a
    pencil eraser (always worth a try--if it works it's a cheap fix, if it
    doesn't work you haven't spent anything but a minute or so of your
    time). Others have reported success from shimming the contacts on the
    door in various ways--using flat wooden toothpicks under them or pieces
    of cardboard or thin foam for example.
    J. Clarke, Oct 25, 2013
    #2
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  3. David Taylor

    me Guest

    On Fri, 25 Oct 2013 07:36:33 -0400, "J. Clarke"
    <> wrote:

    >If you google "A560 NiMH Problem" you'll find numerous reports of what
    >you are seeing. Again it seems to be a mechanical issue with the
    >battery contacts. Some have reported succcess by cleaning them with a
    >pencil eraser (always worth a try--if it works it's a cheap fix, if it
    >doesn't work you haven't spent anything but a minute or so of your
    >time). Others have reported success from shimming the contacts on the
    >door in various ways--using flat wooden toothpicks under them or pieces
    >of cardboard or thin foam for example.



    These was/is and issue with many of the initial high capacity AA NiMH
    batteries not properly conforming to the dimension specifications
    which lead to various issues years ago. I experienced such with the
    initial Nikon battery grip for the CP-5700. Eventually led to a
    redesign though it would appear the real issue was the height of the
    battery post above the body.

    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/CP_5700/Nits/Cp5700_nits.html
    me, Oct 25, 2013
    #3
  4. David Taylor

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, me
    <> wrote:

    > These was/is and issue with many of the initial high capacity AA NiMH
    > batteries not properly conforming to the dimension specifications
    > which lead to various issues years ago. I experienced such with the
    > initial Nikon battery grip for the CP-5700. Eventually led to a
    > redesign though it would appear the real issue was the height of the
    > battery post above the body.
    >
    > http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/CP_5700/Nits/Cp5700_nits.html


    you have that backwards.

    it's nikon's camera that didn't conform to the proper dimensions, not
    the batteries.

    only one slot on one camera has an issue, for which nikon issued a fix.

    other cameras and devices did not have any such problem.
    nospam, Oct 25, 2013
    #4
  5. David Taylor

    me Guest

    On Fri, 25 Oct 2013 14:39:19 -0400, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, me
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> These was/is and issue with many of the initial high capacity AA NiMH
    >> batteries not properly conforming to the dimension specifications
    >> which lead to various issues years ago. I experienced such with the
    >> initial Nikon battery grip for the CP-5700. Eventually led to a
    >> redesign though it would appear the real issue was the height of the
    >> battery post above the body.
    >>
    >> http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/CP_5700/Nits/Cp5700_nits.html

    >
    >you have that backwards.
    >
    >it's nikon's camera that didn't conform to the proper dimensions, not
    >the batteries.
    >
    >only one slot on one camera has an issue, for which nikon issued a fix.
    >
    >other cameras and devices did not have any such problem.


    Actually Nikon's original case conformed to the published IEEE
    dimensions specs for the batteries. While there was a difference in
    the molding if the batteries conformed to the published spec they
    worked, if they didn't then they didn't work. That's why we have
    published specs. But seeing the trend for higher capacity batts and
    that the only way it was being made was to violate the dimensional
    specs Nikon was prudent and changed their design.
    me, Oct 25, 2013
    #5
  6. David Taylor

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, me
    <> wrote:

    > >> These was/is and issue with many of the initial high capacity AA NiMH
    > >> batteries not properly conforming to the dimension specifications
    > >> which lead to various issues years ago. I experienced such with the
    > >> initial Nikon battery grip for the CP-5700. Eventually led to a
    > >> redesign though it would appear the real issue was the height of the
    > >> battery post above the body.
    > >>
    > >> http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/CP_5700/Nits/Cp5700_nits.html

    > >
    > >you have that backwards.
    > >
    > >it's nikon's camera that didn't conform to the proper dimensions, not
    > >the batteries.
    > >
    > >only one slot on one camera has an issue, for which nikon issued a fix.
    > >
    > >other cameras and devices did not have any such problem.

    >
    > Actually Nikon's original case conformed to the published IEEE
    > dimensions specs for the batteries.


    yet no other device had any such problem, not even other nikon cameras.

    whatever spec they were supposedly conforming to was not the one the
    rest of the world was using, or even other product teams at nikon.

    odd how all those other noncompliant cameras went unnoticed by millions
    and millions of consumers.
    nospam, Oct 25, 2013
    #6
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