Re: NAS Units

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by PeeCee, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. PeeCee

    PeeCee Guest

    "Collector€NZ" <> wrote in message
    news:4a596362$...
    > Some time back there was a thread here on the cheaper NAS units available.
    > Those in the $250-$400 range.
    >
    > My requirement is for minimum 2 Sata2 Drives 10/100/1000 ethernet
    > connection (1Gb not quite so important) would be good if it had some raid
    > options, FTP and SAMBA ETC.
    > Any recomendations (No I do not want to run up and old computer and use
    > Linux)




    I've tried the three units listed below (with comments)

    In general though from my experience a small form factor PC running freeNAS
    or something is definitely going to be a lot more reliable and faster.
    I'ts think the small NAS's suffer from having small power supplies that
    can't handle minor mains hiccups & subsequently lock up, compounded by
    minimalist electronics that are just not up to heavy workloads.
    The Netgear I run gets it's AC from a UPS which probably explains it's
    reliability, though it's NDAS software is not so reliable and I have to
    reassign drive letters occasionally.

    While I've not run a 'freeNAS' box, I have had a couple of old Compaq 386's
    running as dialup routers in the past using Linux software (can't remember
    what, sorry)
    Both of those PC's ran for 'years' without any problems, hence my suggestion
    to seriously consider using such a Linux based setup.

    I would also suggest you Google any NAS box you are looking at.
    I'll bet it's not until you get into the $1000 + units that you start to get
    any positive experiences.
    Kinda makes the whole excercise uneconomic.

    Best
    Paul.

    Linksys NAS 200.
    Takes 2 x SATA drives, RAID, native NAS and various extra's like FTP servers
    etc.
    Found it was slow and locked up when trying to do large file transfers.
    Got so p'd off with it I've just chucked it under the bench after only a few
    months use.
    Try googling 'NAS 200 problems' and you'll get thousands of hit's

    Netgear Storage Central
    Takes 2 x IDE drives, RAID.
    Not fast, though better than the Linksys.
    Reliable enough, but not native NAS, ie needs software to be seen on the
    LAN.
    (Windows only)
    Has been my my home LAN backup NAS for 2 - 3 years now.

    Jaycar XC something.
    Only single SATA or IDE drive internally but takes USB external drives,
    built in FTP, Media, Printer & other servers
    Not fast, native NAS, fairly reliable.
    This one is probably has the most facilities and with an external drive
    plugged in would suit your two drive requirement.
    Can't do RAID though.
    Have 3 in work.
    Number 1 at a country location wouldn't stay online overnight, suspected
    power corruptions, ended up on USB, working fine.
    Number 2 runs 24/7 as a Doctors backup, locks up every few months, but
    othewise reliable.
    Number 3 runs here as an occasional backup NAS, fan gets noisy as drive
    heats up so gets turned off to shut it up.
    Compared to the NAS 200 that was there before, much more reliable.
     
    PeeCee, Jul 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. PeeCee

    thingy Guest

    On Jul 13, 10:57 pm, "PeeCee" <> wrote:
    > "Collector€NZ" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:4a596362$...
    >
    > > Some time back there was a thread here on the cheaper NAS units available.
    > > Those in the $250-$400 range.

    >
    > > My requirement is for minimum 2 Sata2 Drives 10/100/1000 ethernet
    > > connection (1Gb not quite so important) would be good if it had some raid
    > > options, FTP and SAMBA ETC.
    > > Any recomendations (No I do not want to run up and old computer and use
    > > Linux)

    >
    > I've tried the three units listed below (with comments)
    >
    > In general though from my experience a small form factor PC running freeNAS
    > or something is definitely going to be a lot more reliable and faster.
    > I'ts think the small NAS's suffer from having small power supplies that
    > can't handle minor mains hiccups & subsequently lock up, compounded by
    > minimalist electronics that are just not up to heavy workloads.
    > The Netgear I run gets it's AC from a UPS which probably explains it's
    > reliability, though it's NDAS software is not so reliable and I have to
    > reassign drive letters occasionally.
    >
    > While I've not run a 'freeNAS' box, I have had a couple of old Compaq 386's
    > running as dialup routers in the past using Linux software (can't remember
    > what, sorry)
    > Both of those PC's ran for 'years' without any problems, hence my suggestion
    > to seriously consider using such a Linux based setup.
    >
    > I would also suggest you Google any NAS box you are looking at.
    > I'll bet it's not until you get into the $1000 + units that you start to get
    > any positive experiences.
    > Kinda makes the whole excercise uneconomic.
    >
    > Best
    > Paul.
    >
    > Linksys NAS 200.
    > Takes 2 x SATA drives, RAID, native NAS and various extra's like FTP servers
    > etc.
    > Found it was slow and locked up when trying to do large file transfers.
    > Got so p'd off with it I've just chucked it under the bench after only a few
    > months use.
    > Try googling 'NAS 200 problems' and you'll get thousands of hit's
    >
    > Netgear Storage Central
    > Takes 2 x IDE drives, RAID.
    > Not fast, though better than the Linksys.
    > Reliable enough, but not native NAS, ie needs software to be seen on the
    > LAN.
    > (Windows only)
    > Has been my my home LAN backup NAS for 2 - 3 years now.
    >
    > Jaycar XC something.
    > Only single SATA or IDE drive internally but takes USB external drives,
    > built in FTP, Media, Printer & other servers
    > Not fast, native NAS, fairly reliable.
    > This one is probably has the most facilities and with an external drive
    > plugged in would suit your two drive requirement.
    > Can't do RAID though.
    > Have 3 in work.
    > Number  1 at a country location wouldn't stay online overnight, suspected
    > power corruptions, ended up on USB, working fine.
    > Number 2 runs 24/7 as a Doctors backup, locks up every few months, but
    > othewise reliable.
    > Number 3 runs here as an occasional backup NAS, fan gets noisy as drive
    > heats up so gets turned off to shut it up.
    > Compared to the NAS 200 that was there before, much more reliable.


    $1000 for a NAS is serious money....at that point a carfully done (ie
    hardware components) small PC running Freenas or openfiler has to be a
    serious contender. Also with a proprietry NAS you throw it away if it
    fails...and probably lose the data...

    At the moment I am running a debian server which does a lot more than
    just NAS....its previous life consisted of a dual p3-700 which ran for
    3 years....before that it was a p2-300 which ran for 4....to get to
    the 2x p3-700 I just swapped the motherboard out as I got the assembly
    cheaply....ie less than $100...The only reason its now a dual core
    celeron (and approaching 2 years old) is to save energy and I broke
    the ps/2 socket when I dropped the keyboard off the shelf its on and
    it yanked it....bugger as they say....I could still connect
    remotely...

    case $115
    PSU $150
    mb

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Jul 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. PeeCee

    thingy Guest

    On Jul 13, 10:57 pm, "PeeCee" <> wrote:
    > "Collector€NZ" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:4a596362$...
    >
    > > Some time back there was a thread here on the cheaper NAS units available.
    > > Those in the $250-$400 range.

    >
    > > My requirement is for minimum 2 Sata2 Drives 10/100/1000 ethernet
    > > connection (1Gb not quite so important) would be good if it had some raid
    > > options, FTP and SAMBA ETC.
    > > Any recomendations (No I do not want to run up and old computer and use
    > > Linux)

    >
    > I've tried the three units listed below (with comments)
    >
    > In general though from my experience a small form factor PC running freeNAS
    > or something is definitely going to be a lot more reliable and faster.
    > I'ts think the small NAS's suffer from having small power supplies that
    > can't handle minor mains hiccups & subsequently lock up, compounded by
    > minimalist electronics that are just not up to heavy workloads.
    > The Netgear I run gets it's AC from a UPS which probably explains it's
    > reliability, though it's NDAS software is not so reliable and I have to
    > reassign drive letters occasionally.
    >
    > While I've not run a 'freeNAS' box, I have had a couple of old Compaq 386's
    > running as dialup routers in the past using Linux software (can't remember
    > what, sorry)
    > Both of those PC's ran for 'years' without any problems, hence my suggestion
    > to seriously consider using such a Linux based setup.
    >
    > I would also suggest you Google any NAS box you are looking at.
    > I'll bet it's not until you get into the $1000 + units that you start to get
    > any positive experiences.
    > Kinda makes the whole excercise uneconomic.
    >
    > Best
    > Paul.
    >
    > Linksys NAS 200.
    > Takes 2 x SATA drives, RAID, native NAS and various extra's like FTP servers
    > etc.
    > Found it was slow and locked up when trying to do large file transfers.
    > Got so p'd off with it I've just chucked it under the bench after only a few
    > months use.
    > Try googling 'NAS 200 problems' and you'll get thousands of hit's
    >
    > Netgear Storage Central
    > Takes 2 x IDE drives, RAID.
    > Not fast, though better than the Linksys.
    > Reliable enough, but not native NAS, ie needs software to be seen on the
    > LAN.
    > (Windows only)
    > Has been my my home LAN backup NAS for 2 - 3 years now.
    >
    > Jaycar XC something.
    > Only single SATA or IDE drive internally but takes USB external drives,
    > built in FTP, Media, Printer & other servers
    > Not fast, native NAS, fairly reliable.
    > This one is probably has the most facilities and with an external drive
    > plugged in would suit your two drive requirement.
    > Can't do RAID though.
    > Have 3 in work.
    > Number  1 at a country location wouldn't stay online overnight, suspected
    > power corruptions, ended up on USB, working fine.
    > Number 2 runs 24/7 as a Doctors backup, locks up every few months, but
    > othewise reliable.
    > Number 3 runs here as an occasional backup NAS, fan gets noisy as drive
    > heats up so gets turned off to shut it up.
    > Compared to the NAS 200 that was there before, much more reliable.


    When I looked for a 4 disk setup the price was $1500, which is plain
    stupid money...also raid5 seems to be un-common...and you can forget
    raid6....

    For $1000 you can build a basic PC with good components and a web
    interface, little different to a ready made NAS box...also when the
    NAS box dies, its a throw away item, and you may not recover the
    data....

    For home use I can understand them, but for a small business.....cost
    seems to be the main criteria...better than nothing I suppose.

    The advantages of a small ready made NAS box are; low cost, simple,
    small, usually silent and low power consumption, but the second you
    get past its capacity then you have to have 2 or 3 or.....and managing
    these becomes an issue...

    If you know your criteria isnt going past a 2 disk raid 1 and low duty
    then fine....Ive used the d-links and to upload/download 800gb takes
    hours.....even on a 1gb link, the disk sub-system just seems in-
    adequate....My openfiler box on the other hand can handle a handful of
    ESX guests via iSCSI...yet its a p3-933 with 2gb of ram, hardly a huge
    spec...the raid controllers and disks is where its at, especially for
    iscsi....

    and before ppl knock pata / sata raid, my Promise SX6000 with a R5
    (4+1) and 5400rpm ide disks is twice as fast as my Perc 3 R5(3+1) with
    10,000rpm scsi disks...yes its old kit, but of the same age....so dont
    assume, test.

    regards

    thing
     
    thingy, Jul 13, 2009
    #3
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