Re: My CPU is running at stock speed!!!!

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Chris Wilkinson, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. Hi there,

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Puddle" typed:
    >> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>> I've been weighing up my options, trying to work out how to reduce my
    >>> computing electricity usage.

    > [snip]
    >> Time to get some of these
    >> http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/48f7e60a03fd438c273fc0a87f3b06e3/Product/View/O3347
    >>
    >> Whack them on your roof, hook them up to some batteries, and you can
    >> run your laptop, netbook etc without paying the power companies :)

    >
    > Yeah, photo-voltaics would be really nice. However it's hardly economically
    > viable. They're rated at peak, on a clear day in Dubai pointed directly at
    > the sun. Realistically you could probably expect <50W for 7 hours a day in a
    > NZ summer out of them. So, to make up for inefficiencies in conversion /
    > storage you'd need a minimum of three panels (@ $830 each). Add in the
    > required regulators and storage / power feed and there's another $1K minimum
    > (with the storage, likely SLAs, needing replacing every 24 months or so..),
    > call it $3.5K all up. And that's just to run a moderately powerful lappy
    > 24/7 or a netbook / top 24/7 and a gaming-capable PC for an hour or two a
    > day.
    >
    > It'd be lots cheaper to run a turbine on the roof, it's almost constantly
    > windy here. A water-wheel / turbine would be even better as it'd not disturb
    > the neighbours but it'd cost the landlord a fortune running the hose 24/7
    > (water rates included in rent). <g>


    An organic farm I recently worked at for a couple of weeks in the UK was
    completely removed from the national grid. It had a 7kWh wind turbine,
    and an array of PV's (50m2). This all fed an array of 48V cells that if
    fully charged could run the entire 36 acre farm and house for 4 days
    without any recharge. The cost? At £25,000 it wasn't a small sum of
    money, but the farmer expects the investment to pay for itself inside
    6-8 years.

    The only downside was that when the farmer offered to feed excess back
    to the grid he was told he would have to pay for installation of the
    line back to the grid from the farmhouse. At over 1km it would have
    cost him a quoted £80,000. The payment he would have received per kWh
    would make it impossible for the investment to pay for itself inside
    his expected lifespan - and he's only in his late-thirties... :-(

    Unsurprisingly he declined the deal. He wasn't worried - with enough
    juice from the turbine/PV's to never have to buy electricity again,
    and with 36 acres of prime quality organic produce (very tasty I
    might add) they're getting by quite comfortably...

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Hi there,

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Chris Wilkinson" typed:
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>> Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Puddle" typed:
    >>>> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>>>> I've been weighing up my options, trying to work out how to reduce
    >>>>> my computing electricity usage.
    >>> [snip]
    >>>> Time to get some of these
    >>>> http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/48f7e60a03fd438c273fc0a87f3b06e3/Product/View/O3347
    >>>>
    >>>> Whack them on your roof, hook them up to some batteries, and you can
    >>>> run your laptop, netbook etc without paying the power companies :)
    >>> Yeah, photo-voltaics would be really nice. However it's hardly
    >>> economically viable. They're rated at peak, on a clear day in Dubai
    >>> pointed directly at the sun. Realistically you could probably expect
    >>> <50W for 7 hours a day in a NZ summer out of them. So, to make up
    >>> for inefficiencies in conversion / storage you'd need a minimum of
    >>> three panels (@ $830 each). Add in the required regulators and
    >>> storage / power feed and there's another $1K minimum (with the
    >>> storage, likely SLAs, needing replacing every 24 months or so..),
    >>> call it $3.5K all up. And that's just to run a moderately powerful
    >>> lappy 24/7 or a netbook / top 24/7 and a gaming-capable PC for an
    >>> hour or two a day.
    >>>
    >>> It'd be lots cheaper to run a turbine on the roof, it's almost
    >>> constantly windy here. A water-wheel / turbine would be even better
    >>> as it'd not disturb the neighbours but it'd cost the landlord a
    >>> fortune running the hose 24/7 (water rates included in rent). <g>

    >> An organic farm I recently worked at for a couple of weeks in the UK
    >> was completely removed from the national grid. It had a 7kWh wind
    >> turbine, and an array of PV's (50m2). This all fed an array of 48V
    >> cells that if fully charged could run the entire 36 acre farm and
    >> house for 4 days without any recharge. The cost? At £25,000 it wasn't
    >> a small sum of money, but the farmer expects the investment to pay
    >> for itself inside 6-8 years.
    >>
    >> The only downside was that when the farmer offered to feed excess back
    >> to the grid he was told he would have to pay for installation of the
    >> line back to the grid from the farmhouse. At over 1km it would have
    >> cost him a quoted £80,000. The payment he would have received per kWh
    >> would make it impossible for the investment to pay for itself inside
    >> his expected lifespan - and he's only in his late-thirties... :-(
    >>
    >> Unsurprisingly he declined the deal. He wasn't worried - with enough
    >> juice from the turbine/PV's to never have to buy electricity again,
    >> and with 36 acres of prime quality organic produce (very tasty I
    >> might add) they're getting by quite comfortably...

    >
    > That sounds great! I'd like to put a small turbine on the roof here as the
    > winds are mainly westerlies and, looking west it's flat for miles. This
    > place really catches the wind. However, a combination of renting and poverty
    > make that more of a dream than a plan.


    It takes time and money for anyone to setup that kind of rig. The
    farmer I worked for spent 15 years working in London as a lawyer,
    saving like mad for investment. When it came time to do something
    with his money he decided to do a complete about-turn, abandon the
    rat-race, and settle on a plot of land in the country to establish
    the organic farm with his partner. He said he'd never go back to
    the city, and I can't blame him - not only is the farm beautiful,
    but London is just too crowded.

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 18, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Hi there,

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Chris Wilkinson" typed:
    >> Hi there,
    >> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>> That sounds great! I'd like to put a small turbine on the roof here
    >>> as the winds are mainly westerlies and, looking west it's flat for
    >>> miles. This place really catches the wind. However, a combination of
    >>> renting and poverty make that more of a dream than a plan.

    >> It takes time and money for anyone to setup that kind of rig. The
    >> farmer I worked for spent 15 years working in London as a lawyer,
    >> saving like mad for investment. When it came time to do something
    >> with his money he decided to do a complete about-turn, abandon the
    >> rat-race, and settle on a plot of land in the country to establish
    >> the organic farm with his partner. He said he'd never go back to
    >> the city, and I can't blame him - not only is the farm beautiful,
    >> but London is just too crowded.

    >
    > Totally agree. Like I said, it's a dream for me... However, I'd like to do
    > at least part of it. I have an (engineer) mate who made a turbine out of a
    > F&P 'smartdrive' motor using plans published in Silicon Chip magazine and he


    Hehe! Kiwi injun...ingin, er, cunning... put to good use eh? :)

    > said he gets a surprising amount of power out of it. I don't know specifics
    > but his son has it (and a bank of batteries) powering his 'hut', a CD /
    > radio, a couple lights...
    >
    > Apparently Silicon Chip have improved on it since he made his prototype.


    I had a plan once to build an electric ducted fan model jetliner,
    that instead of using heavy batteries used a small OS gas motor
    driving a generator which in turn drove the electric ducted fans.
    I never got to build it, but if it had worked how I intended I
    could have created a model a/c that was propelled by electric
    fans, but that was only limited in flight time by how much fuel
    could be carried to drive the OS motor - I estimated I could get
    much longer flight times than an a/c powered by rechargeable
    batteries, which usually don't last long powering larger electric
    fans.

    Similar principle I guess, but a motor from an old F&P is quite
    possibly cheaper than electric ducted fans and small generators,
    oh, and enough r/c radio gear (9ch) to control the thing would
    have cost thousands for what I wanted... d'oh!

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 18, 2008
    #3
  4. Chris Wilkinson

    Craig Shore Guest

    In article <-privat.org>, says...
    > The latest thing to keep niggling me is why don't high-end lawnmowers have a
    > weedeater / edger built into the side of the body? My mower is a commercial
    > model, (I've had it with "consumer-grade" crap) had a list price of $1195
    > (got it for $900) and has a plenty powerful Honda OHC engine. Why not an
    > engine PTO / clutch and integrated / attachable / foldaway weedeater? It
    > would make keeping the section tidy so much easier and likely cost less than
    > a seperate machine. It would surely be easier as I'm pushing the mower along
    > the edge anyway, might as well be trimming it as I go right?


    http://www.enviromower.co.nz/enviromower_accessories.shtml#trimmer
    Craig Shore, Oct 19, 2008
    #4
  5. Chris Wilkinson

    bugalugs Guest

    ~misfit~ wrote:have cost thousands for what I wanted... d'oh!
    >
    > Yes, it sure sounds like an expensive project. That's what's stopped me from
    > doing all of the things that I think up.. Expense. I had a friend who
    > thought up some brilliant ways to retro-fit efficient freshly-designed
    > woodburners into existing fireplaces (20+ years ago..). He ended up spending
    > a few $K at the patent office before giving up. He had no money left for R&D
    > after that.
    >
    > Cheers,


    Might now have a problem doing that

    Was talking to a friend on Monday who has a wetback wood burner which
    has got old and decrepit (essentially burnt out) and needs to be
    replaced. To buy a replacement he has to have a permit. But he can't get
    a permit because his property is only 1.8Ha. To be issued with a permit
    the property must be at least 2Ha.

    But he's 22Km out in a remote area of the country. His nearest neighbour
    is 500M away. He's an expert on one particular tree cultivar and his
    property is covered in trees.

    Makes you wonder if the gummint wants to force you into use electricity
    because they own the generating companies and they want to protect their
    profits.
    bugalugs, Oct 21, 2008
    #5
  6. Chris Wilkinson

    A _L_ P Guest

    Re: Beuracracy gone mad! Was: My CPU is running at stock speed!!!!

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > [crossed to nz.general]
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs "ChrisOD" typed:
    >> bugalugs wrote:
    >>> Was talking to a friend on Monday who has a wetback wood burner which
    >>> has got old and decrepit (essentially burnt out) and needs to be
    >>> replaced. To buy a replacement he has to have a permit. But he can't
    >>> get a permit because his property is only 1.8Ha. To be issued with a
    >>> permit the property must be at least 2Ha.


    Can he get the burnt out pieces re-cast by a foundry, then he'd only be
    replacing broken pieces.

    Or can he source a 2nd hand one that pre-dates his occupation of the
    property, and was therefore in place "when he moved in"?

    Or just put the fucker in, if necessary using the good offices of
    someone who has 2+ Ha of land.

    Too many goddamn laws. Raise middle finger regularly, albeit of
    necessity discreetly.

    A L P
    A _L_ P, Oct 22, 2008
    #6
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