Re: MP3 Player to RCA jacks

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by ChrisCoaster, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. ChrisCoaster

    ChrisCoaster Guest

    On Mar 3, 5:55 pm, "Steve B" <> wrote:
    > I have an old heavy huge brand name stereo amplifier and some BIG speakers.
    > It is the type from the sixties and seventies used to play vinyl records.
    >
    > I want to hook it up to either a computer or MP3 player and use it for a
    > juke box, playing randomly.
    >
    > What type of interface do I need to go from the player to RCA?  I think it
    > probably will be proprietary to the player.
    >
    > How do I use the player as a source, then run it through the amp to boost
    > the signal to the speakers?
    >
    > Pardon me if this is a simple question.  I've never owned an MP3 player, but
    > now that I'm researching one, they are fascinating.
    >
    > Are there big differences in them?  I know they are all over the map price
    > wise.  I don't need anything terribly robust, as I won't be jogging or
    > motorcycle riding with it.
    >
    > And lastly, will it play only MP3 type files, or will it play others as
    > downloaded from Limewire?  Or is there a way to convert the files that are
    > not MP3 to MP3?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Steve

    ______________________________
    Sandisk has a division called Sansa which makes a variety of players
    in many sizes and capacities - all with a great combo of features.
    I own the View - a terriffic combination of:
    -Music
    -Video(including Video out to a TV)
    -Podcasts
    -Photos
    -Voice Recorder
    -FM Radio
    -EQ presets + customizable EQ
    It has almost 16GB of storage and isn't too huge.

    I would recommend it to you except for one glaring problem: The user
    interface(menus, song now playing, volume, etc) looks great but
    freezes terribly - sometimes requiring you to restart the player. You
    won't lose any songs, but this freezing up is a real PITA!

    Sansa makes a smaller "Fuze" -with 8GB of memory and none of the
    View's freezeup issues. Other good "anti-I-Pods" include players
    from: Sony, i-River, and Zune.

    A MP3 Player is like a Pet - you will get out of it what you put into
    it!

    #1. Keep it fully charged
    #2. Keep it fully charged
    #3. Charge it from the wall - not from your PC(although it will charge
    while you are adding files to it)
    #4. WATCH where you get your mp3s from! Pay sites(Amazon, I-Tunes,
    etc) are better.
    #5. Keep it fully charged
    #6. Right-click on a typical mp3 in your PC - this will invoke the
    Properties window. If you see any CRAP: an internet address or
    Chinese lettering - delete it from those fields! The Sansa View is
    particularly susceptible to such metadata - so clean it up!
    #7. You need only the following in the metadata: Title, Artist, Album
    Artist, Album, Year, Track# and Genre. Anything below the bitrate and
    length in minutes(you cannot change those), is unnecessary and you can
    wipe it out.
    #8. And did I mention - keep it fully charged?

    If the battery indicator on your player gets down to half-way - find a
    wall outlet and plug that sucker in and let it charge!!! I didn't on
    one of my many Views, and afterwards the time/date froze to when I
    last set it, and the player hung up when I tried to access the FM
    radio. Do NOT NOT NOT let the battery go below half or completely
    empty. If you do - start budgeting for a new player. Those are the
    facts.

    Something that shouldn't affect your player's health, but will affect
    the enjoyment of your music - the Bitrate. 128kbps is fine for stuff
    from the 1960s or earlier, or for podcasts(spoken word with some
    background music). 64kbps is fine for old radio shows like "The
    Shadow" or "Fibber McGee", or recordings off the AM radio.

    I personally try to keep as much of my music above 160kbps. Other
    common(and better) bitrates include 192, 224, 256, and 320kbps. You
    may find a mp3 with a bitrate of 200kbps - odd looking - but harmless,
    and certainly closer to CD than 128! Most of Amazon's stuff is at 224
    or higher. You'll be very hardpressed to distinguish the difference
    between a Red Hot Chili Peppers song at 256 or 320K. Drop that down
    to 128 - and the loss of detail in both the bass and treble will be
    noticeable - particularly if you sprint for a decent $40 set of buds
    or larger set of cans, or, if you listen over a well-powered stereo
    with good speakers.
    256kpbs is the BEST compromise between great fidelity and saving
    space. I also avoid "variable-bit-rate"(VBR) mp3s - where the bitrate
    drops down to, say, 128 for a soft passage, and then ramps up to 200
    or 300 for louder more complex portions.

    Pardon the diatribe, but I hope you and others find this useful.

    -ChrisCoaster
    ChrisCoaster, Mar 4, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ChrisCoaster

    ChrisCoaster Guest

    On Mar 4, 12:00 am, "Steve B" <> wrote:

    >
    > Thanks for the big gob of information.  I have filed your post, and will
    > consume it a chunk at a time.
    >
    > I want a player that will be stationary in my shop.  Just the player, the
    > amp, and two speakers.  I went to Radio Shack and looked at iPods and
    > Shuffles.  They had Sensa connectors, and Monster at a Monster price.  The
    > 1/8" to RCA Sense connectors were $15 IIRC.  They had offbrands for less.
    > They also had a power converter.  If I use it stationary, will a power
    > transformer suffice instead of the battery?  And if so, should I pull it off
    > the charger occasionally, or does it have a "float" feature that will not
    > allow it to overcharge itself?
    >
    > Steve- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -

    __________________________________
    That's my Italian side - we love to talk! :)

    So it's going to be a shop sound system. Hmm. I don't know enough
    about running the mp3player constantly off the wall outlet. I know it
    has been advised against as far as cell phones are concerned: (CAUTION
    I HOPE YOU HAVE NOT EATEN RECENTLY!!!) http://www.hoax-slayer.com/cell-phone-charging.html
    But this may be an "urban legend". LOL

    Best to check with the player's mfgr about that. As far as running
    it through an amp or stereo, I leave my player's volume at about 3/4 -
    NEVER maxxed, and use little or no EQ/tone control. I control volume
    at the amp.

    -CC
    ChrisCoaster, Mar 4, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ChrisCoaster

    Neil Green Guest

    Steve B wrote:
    > "ChrisCoaster" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > On Mar 3, 5:55 pm, "Steve B" <> wrote:
    >> I have an old heavy huge brand name stereo amplifier and some BIG
    >> speakers.
    >> It is the type from the sixties and seventies used to play vinyl
    >> records. I want to hook it up to either a computer or MP3 player and use
    >> it
    >> for a juke box, playing randomly.
    >>
    >> What type of interface do I need to go from the player to RCA? I
    >> think it probably will be proprietary to the player.
    >>
    >> How do I use the player as a source, then run it through the amp to
    >> boost the signal to the speakers?
    >>
    >> Pardon me if this is a simple question. I've never owned an MP3
    >> player, but
    >> now that I'm researching one, they are fascinating.
    >>
    >> Are there big differences in them? I know they are all over the map
    >> price wise. I don't need anything terribly robust, as I won't be
    >> jogging or motorcycle riding with it.
    >>
    >> And lastly, will it play only MP3 type files, or will it play others
    >> as downloaded from Limewire? Or is there a way to convert the files
    >> that are not MP3 to MP3?
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Steve

    > ______________________________
    > Sandisk has a division called Sansa which makes a variety of players
    > in many sizes and capacities - all with a great combo of features.
    > I own the View - a terriffic combination of:
    > -Music
    > -Video(including Video out to a TV)
    > -Podcasts
    > -Photos
    > -Voice Recorder
    > -FM Radio
    > -EQ presets + customizable EQ
    > It has almost 16GB of storage and isn't too huge.
    >
    > I would recommend it to you except for one glaring problem: The user
    > interface(menus, song now playing, volume, etc) looks great but
    > freezes terribly - sometimes requiring you to restart the player. You
    > won't lose any songs, but this freezing up is a real PITA!
    >
    > Sansa makes a smaller "Fuze" -with 8GB of memory and none of the
    > View's freezeup issues. Other good "anti-I-Pods" include players
    > from: Sony, i-River, and Zune.
    >
    > A MP3 Player is like a Pet - you will get out of it what you put into
    > it!
    >
    > #1. Keep it fully charged
    > #2. Keep it fully charged
    > #3. Charge it from the wall - not from your PC(although it will charge
    > while you are adding files to it)
    > #4. WATCH where you get your mp3s from! Pay sites(Amazon, I-Tunes,
    > etc) are better.
    > #5. Keep it fully charged
    > #6. Right-click on a typical mp3 in your PC - this will invoke the
    > Properties window. If you see any CRAP: an internet address or
    > Chinese lettering - delete it from those fields! The Sansa View is
    > particularly susceptible to such metadata - so clean it up!
    > #7. You need only the following in the metadata: Title, Artist, Album
    > Artist, Album, Year, Track# and Genre. Anything below the bitrate and
    > length in minutes(you cannot change those), is unnecessary and you can
    > wipe it out.
    > #8. And did I mention - keep it fully charged?
    >
    > If the battery indicator on your player gets down to half-way - find a
    > wall outlet and plug that sucker in and let it charge!!! I didn't on
    > one of my many Views, and afterwards the time/date froze to when I
    > last set it, and the player hung up when I tried to access the FM
    > radio. Do NOT NOT NOT let the battery go below half or completely
    > empty. If you do - start budgeting for a new player. Those are the
    > facts.
    >
    > Something that shouldn't affect your player's health, but will affect
    > the enjoyment of your music - the Bitrate. 128kbps is fine for stuff
    > from the 1960s or earlier, or for podcasts(spoken word with some
    > background music). 64kbps is fine for old radio shows like "The
    > Shadow" or "Fibber McGee", or recordings off the AM radio.
    >
    > I personally try to keep as much of my music above 160kbps. Other
    > common(and better) bitrates include 192, 224, 256, and 320kbps. You
    > may find a mp3 with a bitrate of 200kbps - odd looking - but harmless,
    > and certainly closer to CD than 128! Most of Amazon's stuff is at 224
    > or higher. You'll be very hardpressed to distinguish the difference
    > between a Red Hot Chili Peppers song at 256 or 320K. Drop that down
    > to 128 - and the loss of detail in both the bass and treble will be
    > noticeable - particularly if you sprint for a decent $40 set of buds
    > or larger set of cans, or, if you listen over a well-powered stereo
    > with good speakers.
    > 256kpbs is the BEST compromise between great fidelity and saving
    > space. I also avoid "variable-bit-rate"(VBR) mp3s - where the bitrate
    > drops down to, say, 128 for a soft passage, and then ramps up to 200
    > or 300 for louder more complex portions.
    >
    > Pardon the diatribe, but I hope you and others find this useful.
    >
    > -ChrisCoaster
    >
    > Thanks for the big gob of information. I have filed your post, and
    > will consume it a chunk at a time.
    >
    > I want a player that will be stationary in my shop. Just the player,
    > the amp, and two speakers. I went to Radio Shack and looked at iPods
    > and Shuffles. They had Sensa connectors, and Monster at a Monster
    > price. The 1/8" to RCA Sense connectors were $15 IIRC. They had
    > offbrands for less. They also had a power converter. If I use it
    > stationary, will a power transformer suffice instead of the battery? And
    > if so, should I pull it off the charger occasionally, or does it
    > have a "float" feature that will not allow it to overcharge itself?
    >
    > Steve


    I run a very similar setup to what you describe with a Sandisk 1Gb MP3
    player and an old Onkyo amp and speakers.
    You need a 3.5mm stereo to RCA cable, I got one on eBay for about $5
    delivered, plug it into the headphone socket of your MP3 player and into the
    Aux or Line inputs of the amp, set the player to shuffle and you're good to
    go, don't use the phono input if the amp has one.
    The Igb player I have holds roughly 200 songs at 128Kbps which I find is
    acceptable, as Chris has said you may like to use higher bit rates but they
    will consume more storage space, an MP3 encoded at 256k will be twice the
    size of one encoded at 128k for the same song.
    As MP3 players have become more and more sophisticated, colour screens,video
    playback and the like and capacities have increased exponentially the older
    players are now ridiculously cheap second hand as the kids discard them and
    upgrade, the player I use would cost no more than $10 - $15 on the second
    hand market but it functions flawlessly.
    Mine has what I consider the advantage of using AAA batteries which last
    about 20 hours after which you just swap it over for a fresh one, four good
    quality rechargeables and a charger won't cost you more than $30, buy the
    "ready to use" rechargeables, they have a much longer shelf life, you can
    use the same batteries in many digital cameras.
    From my point of view this is much more convenient than charging from a USB
    cable or wall charger as it makes the device more portable, mine
    interchanges between the workshop and car, most of the later car CD decks
    have a 3.5mm input on the front panel.
    Any player you buy will play MP3 and there are numerous software programs,
    many free, which will encode other formats, there are also many free CD
    rippers so you can source tracks from your CD collection, ripping vinyl
    albums is a little more complicated but not too difficult, my entire
    collection of vinyl (200 albums) has now been converted to digital.
    Hope this helps.
    Neil Green, Mar 5, 2010
    #3
  4. ChrisCoaster

    Neil Green Guest

    Steve B wrote:
    > "Neil Green" <> wrote in message
    > news:4b906692$0$24251$...
    >> Steve B wrote:
    >>> "ChrisCoaster" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>> On Mar 3, 5:55 pm, "Steve B" <> wrote:
    >>>> I have an old heavy huge brand name stereo amplifier and some BIG
    >>>> speakers.
    >>>> It is the type from the sixties and seventies used to play vinyl
    >>>> records. I want to hook it up to either a computer or MP3 player
    >>>> and use it
    >>>> for a juke box, playing randomly.
    >>>>
    >>>> What type of interface do I need to go from the player to RCA? I
    >>>> think it probably will be proprietary to the player.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I use the player as a source, then run it through the amp to
    >>>> boost the signal to the speakers?
    >>>>
    >>>> Pardon me if this is a simple question. I've never owned an MP3
    >>>> player, but
    >>>> now that I'm researching one, they are fascinating.
    >>>>
    >>>> Are there big differences in them? I know they are all over the map
    >>>> price wise. I don't need anything terribly robust, as I won't be
    >>>> jogging or motorcycle riding with it.
    >>>>
    >>>> And lastly, will it play only MP3 type files, or will it play
    >>>> others as downloaded from Limewire? Or is there a way to convert the
    >>>> files
    >>>> that are not MP3 to MP3?
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA
    >>>>
    >>>> Steve
    >>> ______________________________
    >>> Sandisk has a division called Sansa which makes a variety of players
    >>> in many sizes and capacities - all with a great combo of features.
    >>> I own the View - a terriffic combination of:
    >>> -Music
    >>> -Video(including Video out to a TV)
    >>> -Podcasts
    >>> -Photos
    >>> -Voice Recorder
    >>> -FM Radio
    >>> -EQ presets + customizable EQ
    >>> It has almost 16GB of storage and isn't too huge.
    >>>
    >>> I would recommend it to you except for one glaring problem: The
    >>> user interface(menus, song now playing, volume, etc) looks great but
    >>> freezes terribly - sometimes requiring you to restart the player. You
    >>> won't lose any songs, but this freezing up is a real PITA!
    >>>
    >>> Sansa makes a smaller "Fuze" -with 8GB of memory and none of the
    >>> View's freezeup issues. Other good "anti-I-Pods" include players
    >>> from: Sony, i-River, and Zune.
    >>>
    >>> A MP3 Player is like a Pet - you will get out of it what you put
    >>> into it!
    >>>
    >>> #1. Keep it fully charged
    >>> #2. Keep it fully charged
    >>> #3. Charge it from the wall - not from your PC(although it will
    >>> charge while you are adding files to it)
    >>> #4. WATCH where you get your mp3s from! Pay sites(Amazon, I-Tunes,
    >>> etc) are better.
    >>> #5. Keep it fully charged
    >>> #6. Right-click on a typical mp3 in your PC - this will invoke the
    >>> Properties window. If you see any CRAP: an internet address or
    >>> Chinese lettering - delete it from those fields! The Sansa View is
    >>> particularly susceptible to such metadata - so clean it up!
    >>> #7. You need only the following in the metadata: Title, Artist,
    >>> Album Artist, Album, Year, Track# and Genre. Anything below the
    >>> bitrate and length in minutes(you cannot change those), is
    >>> unnecessary and you can wipe it out.
    >>> #8. And did I mention - keep it fully charged?
    >>>
    >>> If the battery indicator on your player gets down to half-way -
    >>> find a wall outlet and plug that sucker in and let it charge!!! I
    >>> didn't on one of my many Views, and afterwards the time/date froze
    >>> to when I last set it, and the player hung up when I tried to access the
    >>> FM
    >>> radio. Do NOT NOT NOT let the battery go below half or completely
    >>> empty. If you do - start budgeting for a new player. Those are the
    >>> facts.
    >>>
    >>> Something that shouldn't affect your player's health, but will
    >>> affect the enjoyment of your music - the Bitrate. 128kbps is fine
    >>> for stuff from the 1960s or earlier, or for podcasts(spoken word
    >>> with some background music). 64kbps is fine for old radio shows
    >>> like "The Shadow" or "Fibber McGee", or recordings off the AM radio.
    >>>
    >>> I personally try to keep as much of my music above 160kbps. Other
    >>> common(and better) bitrates include 192, 224, 256, and 320kbps. You
    >>> may find a mp3 with a bitrate of 200kbps - odd looking - but
    >>> harmless, and certainly closer to CD than 128! Most of Amazon's
    >>> stuff is at 224 or higher. You'll be very hardpressed to
    >>> distinguish the difference between a Red Hot Chili Peppers song at
    >>> 256 or 320K. Drop that down to 128 - and the loss of detail in both the
    >>> bass and treble will be
    >>> noticeable - particularly if you sprint for a decent $40 set of buds
    >>> or larger set of cans, or, if you listen over a well-powered stereo
    >>> with good speakers.
    >>> 256kpbs is the BEST compromise between great fidelity and saving
    >>> space. I also avoid "variable-bit-rate"(VBR) mp3s - where the
    >>> bitrate drops down to, say, 128 for a soft passage, and then ramps
    >>> up to 200 or 300 for louder more complex portions.
    >>>
    >>> Pardon the diatribe, but I hope you and others find this useful.
    >>>
    >>> -ChrisCoaster
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the big gob of information. I have filed your post, and
    >>> will consume it a chunk at a time.
    >>>
    >>> I want a player that will be stationary in my shop. Just the
    >>> player, the amp, and two speakers. I went to Radio Shack and
    >>> looked at iPods and Shuffles. They had Sensa connectors, and
    >>> Monster at a Monster price. The 1/8" to RCA Sense connectors were
    >>> $15 IIRC. They had offbrands for less. They also had a power
    >>> converter. If I use it stationary, will a power transformer
    >>> suffice instead of the battery? And if so, should I pull it off the
    >>> charger occasionally, or does it have a "float" feature that will not
    >>> allow it to overcharge itself?
    >>>
    >>> Steve

    >>
    >> I run a very similar setup to what you describe with a Sandisk 1Gb
    >> MP3 player and an old Onkyo amp and speakers.
    >> You need a 3.5mm stereo to RCA cable, I got one on eBay for about $5
    >> delivered, plug it into the headphone socket of your MP3 player and
    >> into the Aux or Line inputs of the amp, set the player to shuffle
    >> and you're good to go, don't use the phono input if the amp has one.
    >> The Igb player I have holds roughly 200 songs at 128Kbps which I
    >> find is acceptable, as Chris has said you may like to use higher bit
    >> rates but they will consume more storage space, an MP3 encoded at
    >> 256k will be twice the size of one encoded at 128k for the same song.
    >> As MP3 players have become more and more sophisticated, colour
    >> screens,video playback and the like and capacities have increased
    >> exponentially the older players are now ridiculously cheap second
    >> hand as the kids discard them and upgrade, the player I use would
    >> cost no more than $10 - $15 on the second hand market but it
    >> functions flawlessly. Mine has what I consider the advantage of
    >> using AAA batteries which last about 20 hours after which you just
    >> swap it over for a fresh one, four good quality rechargeables and a
    >> charger won't cost you more than $30, buy the "ready to use"
    >> rechargeables, they have a much longer shelf life, you can use the
    >> same batteries in many digital cameras. From my point of view this is
    >> much more convenient than charging
    >> from a USB cable or wall charger as it makes the device more
    >> portable, mine interchanges between the workshop and car, most of
    >> the later car CD decks have a 3.5mm input on the front panel.
    >> Any player you buy will play MP3 and there are numerous software
    >> programs, many free, which will encode other formats, there are also
    >> many free CD rippers so you can source tracks from your CD
    >> collection, ripping vinyl albums is a little more complicated but
    >> not too difficult, my entire collection of vinyl (200 albums) has
    >> now been converted to digital. Hope this helps.

    >
    > Yes, it helps greatly. I figured that I could a simple player
    > without all the jazz on it for a good price. The ones I looked at
    > were 4 and 8 gig. Lots of tunes in that space. I have rechargeable
    > AAA batteries, and an extra charger, so could keep hot batteries in
    > the shop right next to it.
    > Steve


    Yeah, the problem seems to be that most if not all of the players on sale
    currently come with an inbuilt lithium battery which in most cases isn't
    replaceable, some will only recharge via a USB cable so they either need to
    be connected to a PC or you need a charger with a USB adapter.
    Those with a separate wall charger are inevitably more expensive.
    You should be able to pick up an older 1 - 2Gb AAA powered iRiver, Sansa,
    Sony or similar cheap as chips.
    The two or three year old Sansa and iRiver players are drag and drop in
    Windows, the iPods need iTunes installed to transfer music as far as I'm
    aware and are overpriced, the sound quality of the iRivers in particular are
    as good as the iPods, my old Sansa M240 sounds just fine.
    ..
    Neil Green, Mar 5, 2010
    #4
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