Re: monitor diagonal lines

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Luke, Jul 31, 2003.

  1. Luke

    Luke Guest

    Yeah it is caused by interference between the pixel grid of the image and
    the dot pitch of the monitor.

    It's probably more likely to happen when you are running a buget monitor at
    a high resolution because cheaper monitors do not have such a fine dot
    pitch.

    So try changing the resolution or even just changing the size of the image
    using the monitors geometry controls.

    Also try cleaning your screen, sounds silly but fine streaky marks, residue
    from careless cleaning or fine scratches can cause the same effect, so just
    check that is not the cause.

    Luke


    "Rick Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:atqfon$1ph2b$...
    > "Michael P. Broida" <> wrote in message

    news:...
    > > Anna wrote:
    > > >
    > > > hi,
    > > > whenever i bend forward (rather quickly) towards the monitor or lean
    > > > back and i'm looking at a fixed point on a white (or otherwise bright
    > > > colour) background, i see vague white diagonal lines sort of crossing
    > > > eachother and converging at the spot i'm looking at. they disappear
    > > > when i stop moving my head. is this common for all monitors or is it
    > > > this brand (samtron) or is any setting wrong? it can get annoying if i
    > > > move forward or backwards in my chair when i'm reading text against a
    > > > white background or working on images that have a lot of white.
    > > > refresh rate is 85 hz but even setting it to 100 doesnt seem to help
    > > > much.

    > >
    > > Sounds like a Moire pattern. Some monitors have
    > > adjustments that are supposed to reduce that, but
    > > I've never seen it help. Some people don't even
    > > notice them anyway. Do you wear glasses? Strong
    > > corrective lenses can make it more obvious, I think.
    > >
    > > Try turning down the brightness/contrast a bit.
    > >
    > > Biggest help: clean the glass on your monitor. :)
    > > Spots on the monitor make it easier to see those
    > > patterns. And clean your glasses as well. :)

    >
    > Also try a different resolution on the monitor.
    >
    > RickW
    >
    >
    >
     
    Luke, Jul 31, 2003
    #1
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  2. Luke

    Bob Myers Guest

    "Luke" <> wrote in message
    news:bgbp72$hq8$...
    > Yeah it is caused by interference between the pixel grid of the image and
    > the dot pitch of the monitor.


    No, I'm afraid not. What everyone is missing so far is the
    following from the original:


    > > > > hi,
    > > > > whenever i bend forward (rather quickly) towards the monitor or lean

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > > > > back and i'm looking at a fixed point on a white (or otherwise

    bright
    > > > > colour) background, i see vague white diagonal lines sort of

    crossing
    > > > > eachother and converging at the spot i'm looking at. they disappear
    > > > > when i stop moving my head.


    Moire is NOT going to be affected by the motion of the
    observer.

    What's happening is simply the fact that if someone moves
    quickly enough, such that a CRT monitor screen passes rapidly
    through the field of view (and especially if this were going on in a
    darkened environment, such that the monitor is the brightest object
    in the field), you can see all sorts of such artifacts caused by the
    normal raster-scan action of the display. It is perfectly normal,
    and nothing to be concerned about.

    Bob M.
     
    Bob Myers, Jul 31, 2003
    #2
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  3. The message <3f29a0aa$>
    from "Bob Myers" <> contains these words:


    > "Luke" <> wrote in message
    > news:bgbp72$hq8$...
    > > Yeah it is caused by interference between the pixel grid of the image and
    > > the dot pitch of the monitor.


    > No, I'm afraid not. What everyone is missing so far is the
    > following from the original:



    > > > > > hi,
    > > > > > whenever i bend forward (rather quickly) towards the monitor or lean

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > > > > > back and i'm looking at a fixed point on a white (or otherwise

    > bright
    > > > > > colour) background, i see vague white diagonal lines sort of

    > crossing
    > > > > > eachother and converging at the spot i'm looking at. they disappear
    > > > > > when i stop moving my head.


    > Moire is NOT going to be affected by the motion of the
    > observer.


    > What's happening is simply the fact that if someone moves
    > quickly enough, such that a CRT monitor screen passes rapidly
    > through the field of view (and especially if this were going on in a
    > darkened environment, such that the monitor is the brightest object
    > in the field), you can see all sorts of such artifacts caused by the
    > normal raster-scan action of the display. It is perfectly normal,
    > and nothing to be concerned about.


    > Bob M.


    A good example of this "Refresh" effect can be seen with those green
    digital displays on oven clock timers and time/status displays used on
    VCRs and DVD players. For best effect, view under dim ambient lighting.
    A simple way to trigger this phenomena is simply to 'chomp' your teeth
    (or dentures) together. :)

    --
    Regards, John.

    To reply directly, please remove "buttplug" .Mail via the
    "Reply Direct" button and Spam-bots will be rejected.
     
    Johnny B Good, Aug 1, 2003
    #3
  4. Luke

    james Guest

    When I worked in a TV shop we called those Retrace lines. It's when the
    electron beam that scans the image onto the tube gets to the bottom and goes
    back up and starts again. On a computer monitor it seems that would be hard
    to see. I've seen it on old tv's.
    james
    (oh, and I would not worry about it until it starts showing all the time)

    "Bob Myers" <> wrote in message
    news:3f29a0aa$...
    >
    > "Luke" <> wrote in message
    > news:bgbp72$hq8$...
    > > Yeah it is caused by interference between the pixel grid of the image

    and
    > > the dot pitch of the monitor.

    >
    > No, I'm afraid not. What everyone is missing so far is the
    > following from the original:
    >
    >
    > > > > > hi,
    > > > > > whenever i bend forward (rather quickly) towards the monitor or

    lean
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > > > > > back and i'm looking at a fixed point on a white (or otherwise

    > bright
    > > > > > colour) background, i see vague white diagonal lines sort of

    > crossing
    > > > > > eachother and converging at the spot i'm looking at. they

    disappear
    > > > > > when i stop moving my head.

    >
    > Moire is NOT going to be affected by the motion of the
    > observer.
    >
    > What's happening is simply the fact that if someone moves
    > quickly enough, such that a CRT monitor screen passes rapidly
    > through the field of view (and especially if this were going on in a
    > darkened environment, such that the monitor is the brightest object
    > in the field), you can see all sorts of such artifacts caused by the
    > normal raster-scan action of the display. It is perfectly normal,
    > and nothing to be concerned about.
    >
    > Bob M.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    james, Aug 1, 2003
    #4
  5. The message <fIiWa.127829$>
    from "james" <> contains these words:

    > When I worked in a TV shop we called those Retrace lines. It's when the
    > electron beam that scans the image onto the tube gets to the bottom and goes
    > back up and starts again. On a computer monitor it seems that would be hard
    > to see. I've seen it on old tv's.


    The operative word here is *old*! The phenomena being described is
    nothing to do with inadequate blanking of vertical retrace.

    HTH

    --
    Regards, John.

    To reply directly, please remove "buttplug" .Mail via the
    "Reply Direct" button and Spam-bots will be rejected.
     
    Johnny B Good, Aug 1, 2003
    #5
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