Re: Modularity coming to cameras?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joe Kotroczo, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. Joe Kotroczo

    Joe Kotroczo Guest

    On 21/09/2012 05:02, Rich wrote:
    > Apparently, it is coming to CCTV and scientific cameras. A new one has a
    > specialized AMD-produced onboard computer with both a CPU and GPU on the
    > same processor die. What it means is that they'll be able to swap sensors
    > when new ones come out. Something like that for these hyper-expensive
    > bodies would be a very nice thing. Sad if a $2000+ body goes semi-obsolete
    > in a year's time.
    >


    Erm, aren't cameras modular already?

    You can change the lens, you can change the battery, you can stick on
    accessories, flash guns, etc.

    If you have a MF camera you can even change your sensor (by changing
    your digital back.

    So what is "coming" exactly?

    --
    audentes fortuna iuvat
    Joe Kotroczo, Sep 21, 2012
    #1
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  2. Joe Kotroczo

    Me Guest

    On 22/09/2012 9:39 p.m., Rich wrote:
    > Joe Kotroczo <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> On 21/09/2012 05:02, Rich wrote:
    >>> Apparently, it is coming to CCTV and scientific cameras. A new one
    >>> has a specialized AMD-produced onboard computer with both a CPU and
    >>> GPU on the same processor die. What it means is that they'll be able
    >>> to swap sensors when new ones come out. Something like that for
    >>> these hyper-expensive bodies would be a very nice thing. Sad if a
    >>> $2000+ body goes semi-obsolete in a year's time.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Erm, aren't cameras modular already?
    >>
    >> You can change the lens, you can change the battery, you can stick on
    >> accessories, flash guns, etc.
    >>
    >> If you have a MF camera you can even change your sensor (by changing
    >> your digital back.
    >>
    >> So what is "coming" exactly?
    >>

    >
    > Modularity will mean having an extreme low light 12 megapixel sensor and
    > a high resolution 40 megapixel sensor, both of which can fit one camera.
    > It will also mean that when better sensors appear, they can be snapped
    > into pre-existing bodies. It's a long-shot for the Japanese who don't
    > believe in that kind of design philosophy.
    >

    Perhaps because it doesn't work:
    http://home.comcast.net/~nikond70/Charts/PDR.htm#D800,D4
    That's the measured performance of 16mp and 36mp sensor of about the
    same generation, the same surface area, with similar quantum efficiency.
    There's no significant difference - the 16mp sensor is not significantly
    better in low light at all.
    The camera may have higher maximum ISO available, but it's not achieving
    anything which couldn't be done in post processing.
    If they could have stuck the D800 sensor in the D4 and still got 11 FPS
    out of the full frame, they would have.
    Me, Sep 23, 2012
    #2
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  3. Rich <> wrote:
    > Joe Kotroczo <> wrote in
    > news::
    >> On 21/09/2012 05:02, Rich wrote:


    >>> Apparently, it is coming to CCTV and scientific cameras. A new one
    >>> has a specialized AMD-produced onboard computer with both a CPU and
    >>> GPU on the same processor die. What it means is that they'll be able
    >>> to swap sensors when new ones come out. Something like that for
    >>> these hyper-expensive bodies would be a very nice thing. Sad if a
    >>> $2000+ body goes semi-obsolete in a year's time.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Erm, aren't cameras modular already?
    >>
    >> You can change the lens, you can change the battery, you can stick on
    >> accessories, flash guns, etc.
    >>
    >> If you have a MF camera you can even change your sensor (by changing
    >> your digital back.
    >>
    >> So what is "coming" exactly?


    > Modularity will mean having an extreme low light 12 megapixel sensor and
    > a high resolution 40 megapixel sensor, both of which can fit one camera.
    > It will also mean that when better sensors appear, they can be snapped
    > into pre-existing bodies. It's a long-shot for the Japanese who don't
    > believe in that kind of design philosophy.


    Of course there are exceptions. Such as that small enthusiast Japanese
    camera maker featured in the recent Photokina whose camera bodies are
    just bodies without lenses or sensors. Accepts a variety of lens
    mounts and a variety of sensor backs. Can anyone remember their name?

    I think by "Japanese" you meant "the bosses of large Japanese
    corporations". My impression is that among the general Japanese
    population they're more into small scale craft and DIY engineering and
    the modularities that make that possible than Western nations like
    Germany, UK, and the US.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
    Chris Malcolm, Sep 26, 2012
    #3
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