Re: Metered

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Aardvark, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:39:22 -0500, §ñühw€£f wrote:

    > Move to the UK, you can enjoy the necessity of a "licence" to watch
    > teevee


    Which pays for our wonderful BBC TV and radio. Totally ad-free.

    US programs which nominally last an hour are shown in forty-six minutes
    air time on the Beeb.

    :)



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Mar 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. Aardvark

    G. Morgan Guest

    Aardvark wrote:

    >Which pays for our wonderful BBC TV and radio. Totally ad-free.


    That's great if all you want to watch is "how to make cheese" (via National
    Lampoon's European Vacation, a-la Griswalds).

    >US programs which nominally last an hour are shown in forty-six minutes
    >air time on the Beeb.


    What about stations besides BBC?

    How many BBC stations are there?
     
    G. Morgan, Mar 8, 2009
    #2
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  3. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 17:48:01 +0000, G. Morgan wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >>Which pays for our wonderful BBC TV and radio. Totally ad-free.

    >
    > That's great if all you want to watch is "how to make cheese" (via
    > National Lampoon's European Vacation, a-la Griswalds).
    >


    Never seen it. BBC news reporting and programme-making are both highly
    thought of among broadcasters worldwide.

    I know how to make cheese- saw it on a programme on the Beeb last year :)

    >>US programs which nominally last an hour are shown in forty-six minutes
    >>air time on the Beeb.

    >
    > What about stations besides BBC?
    >


    Terrestrial or otherwise?

    > How many BBC stations are there?


    Check out www.bbc.co.uk and you'll see links to all the national and
    local BBC TV and radio stations if you scroll down the page a bit.

    If I'm on the computer during the week I always have www.bbc.co.uk/radio1
    playing. At the weekend it's www.bbc.co.uk/radio2. check 'em out if you
    want.





    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Mar 8, 2009
    #3
  4. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:44:46 +0000, G. Morgan wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >
    >>> That's great if all you want to watch is "how to make cheese" (via
    >>> National Lampoon's European Vacation, a-la Griswalds).
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Never seen it.

    >
    > OMG! You *have* to see it.


    You think so?

    > How can you not have seen it!?!


    I've thus far successfully studiously avoided it.

    > It's a classic.


    One man's meat....

    >
    > Watch the trailer here if you want:
    > http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3870097689/


    Thanks, but I think I'll give it a miss. I've seen trailers for the film
    before. It just doesn't appeal to my sense of humour- too in-your-face
    and frantic for me.

    >
    >>BBC news reporting and programme-making are both highly thought of among
    >>broadcasters worldwide.

    >
    > Oh, I know. I occasionally watch BBC America for the news, and their
    > documentaries are awesome.
    >


    Anything in particular? David Attenborough or something like that?

    >>> What about stations besides BBC?
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Terrestrial or otherwise?

    >
    > I dunno. Are all your stations broadcast DVB-T? What about premium
    > content providers like HBO etc...
    >


    We have five main 'terrestrial' channels- BBC1, BBC2, ITV, Channel 4 and
    Channel Five. 'Terrestrial' in this instance means that they are the only
    channels capable of being received using an ordinary TV aerial. These
    five channels are free to watch (except for the TV receiver licence fee,
    which goes to the BBC). Many more channels can be received either by
    buying a cable TV subscription package or with satellite signal receiving
    equipment and subscription.


    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Mar 8, 2009
    #4
  5. Aardvark

    Keyser Söze Guest

    Aardvark <> wrote in message
    news:BdXsl.56103$2:

    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:44:46 +0000, G. Morgan wrote:
    >
    >> Aardvark wrote:
    >>
    >>>> That's great if all you want to watch is "how to make cheese" (via
    >>>> National Lampoon's European Vacation, a-la Griswalds).
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Never seen it.

    >>
    >> OMG! You *have* to see it.

    >
    > You think so?
    >
    >> How can you not have seen it!?!

    >
    > I've thus far successfully studiously avoided it.
    >
    >> It's a classic.

    >
    > One man's meat....
    >
    >>
    >> Watch the trailer here if you want:
    >> http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3870097689/

    >
    > Thanks, but I think I'll give it a miss. I've seen trailers for the
    > film before. It just doesn't appeal to my sense of humour- too
    > in-your-face and frantic for me.
    >
    >>
    >>> BBC news reporting and programme-making are both highly thought of
    >>> among broadcasters worldwide.

    >>
    >> Oh, I know. I occasionally watch BBC America for the news, and their
    >> documentaries are awesome.
    >>

    >
    > Anything in particular? David Attenborough or something like that?
    >
    >>>> What about stations besides BBC?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Terrestrial or otherwise?

    >>
    >> I dunno. Are all your stations broadcast DVB-T? What about premium
    >> content providers like HBO etc...
    >>

    >
    > We have five main 'terrestrial' channels- BBC1, BBC2, ITV, Channel 4
    > and Channel Five. 'Terrestrial' in this instance means that they are
    > the only channels capable of being received using an ordinary TV
    > aerial. These five channels are free to watch (except for the TV
    > receiver licence fee, which goes to the BBC). Many more channels can
    > be received either by buying a cable TV subscription package or with
    > satellite signal receiving equipment and subscription.


    Don't forget the old chestnut... the wire hanger strategically placed up
    ones' jacksie for best reception of all thing 'mind'.

    --
    Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to
    an understanding of ourselves. Jung

    In individuals, insanity is rare; but in groups, parties,
    nations, and epochs it is the rule. Nietzsche
     
    Keyser Söze, Mar 8, 2009
    #5
  6. Aardvark

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2009-03-08, Aardvark <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:44:46 +0000, G. Morgan wrote:


    [...]

    >> I dunno. Are all your stations broadcast DVB-T? What about premium
    >> content providers like HBO etc...
    >>

    >
    > We have five main 'terrestrial' channels- BBC1, BBC2, ITV, Channel 4 and
    > Channel Five. 'Terrestrial' in this instance means that they are the only
    > channels capable of being received using an ordinary TV aerial.


    You refer to the obsolescent analogue transmissions, already switched off
    in some areas.

    ITV is an independent commercial channel, so is Channel Five; Four is a
    commercial channel but owned by the government (not many people know
    that!).

    > These
    > five channels are free to watch (except for the TV receiver licence fee,
    > which goes to the BBC). Many more channels can be received either by
    > buying a cable TV subscription package or with satellite signal receiving
    > equipment and subscription.


    All the old analogue TV channels are also available free to view via the
    "Freeview" digital terrestrial broadcasts, along with several more and
    sound-only broadcasts from the BBC and others
    <http://www.freeview.co.uk/freeview/Channels>.

    Freeview can usually be received via the same aerial as the old analogue
    stations, but in some cases may need adjustment or a better aerial.
    Set-top boxes and complete digital TV sets have been available for several
    years. DVB-T video-recording equipment has only been in the shops for a
    year or two.

    Digital terrestrial TV broadcasts in Britain began in 1998, originally
    offered by a company called "OnDigital" which was not a commercial
    success. It was re-launched as "ITV Digital" in 2001 but went broke in
    2002 after over-reaching itself buying broadcasting rights for football
    (soccer) games.

    "Freeview" was launched in 2002 and its broadcasts can be received using
    the same equipment as originally provided by OnDigital (but more recent
    equipment is better able to cope with additional features - eg electronic
    programme guides, sub-titles, text information services including news
    travel and weather, and 'interactive' and 'alternative content' broadcasts
    - such as different sporting events, or different games, broadcast by one
    channel).

    Another much newer free to view service with BBC1, BBC2, ITV, and Ch4, and
    many others, is "Freesat" <http://www.freesat.co.uk/>. That needs a
    different sort of set-top box, and of course an appropriate 'dish'.

    It doesn't matter how TV broadcasts are received, a TV Licence is required.
    The licence pays for the BBC's broadcasts in the UK, including sound radio
    and internet, and making the programmes. Well worth it, in my opinion.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Mar 8, 2009
    #6
  7. Aardvark

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 23:01:09 +0000, Whiskers wrote:

    <Lots of interesting and educational stuff>

    Thanks for somewhat fleshing out my bare bones knowledge on the subject,
    mate.


    >
    > It doesn't matter how TV broadcasts are received, a TV Licence is
    > required. The licence pays for the BBC's broadcasts in the UK, including
    > sound radio and internet, and making the programmes. Well worth it, in
    > my opinion.


    Couldn't agree more.



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Mar 9, 2009
    #7
  8. Aardvark

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2009-03-09, Aardvark <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 23:01:09 +0000, Whiskers wrote:
    >
    > <Lots of interesting and educational stuff>
    >
    > Thanks for somewhat fleshing out my bare bones knowledge on the subject,
    > mate.


    I knew being a couch potato would pay off eventually!

    >> It doesn't matter how TV broadcasts are received, a TV Licence is
    >> required. The licence pays for the BBC's broadcasts in the UK, including
    >> sound radio and internet, and making the programmes. Well worth it, in
    >> my opinion.

    >
    > Couldn't agree more.


    Other channels are available ...

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Mar 9, 2009
    #8
  9. §ñühw¤£f wrote:

    .....
    > Yep. Its getting to be unwatchable. You either have to wear out the
    > mute button or flip back & forth to another channel to avoid the ads.
    >

    Or watch with a little delay letting noad do the work of cutting the ad
    breaks, on my linux vdr.
     
    wisdomkiller & pain, Mar 10, 2009
    #9
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