Re: Looking for DSLR selection recommendation

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by PeterN, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/2/2013 11:29 PM, Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > alex_m <alex_m@none> wrote:
    >> My old Nikon D40 was stolen on a recent trip and I am looking for a
    >> replacement. Any advice is greatly appreciated! Here is more info:

    >
    > A Nikon D40 is rather old (2006) and outdated technology by
    > today's standards, which should make replacing it a bit
    > of a joy!
    >
    >> I have a Canon 1D mark ii N (long in the tooth, but I still like it a
    >> LOT and use as a primary camera). I used D40 on trips where the weight
    >> of 1D is a pain, with either a light prime or a 18-200 superzoom. I
    >> played a little with small compacts (Lumix and Nikon) and realized
    >> they do not work for me -- I like the size, but I am underwhelmed by the
    >> pictures. Likely a part of this is my fault, but I decided to stay
    >> with DSLRs.

    >
    > The Canon 1DMII is also very long of tooth (2004), but
    > has at least an advantage of being a high end camera
    > with lots of great features, if not such great image
    > quality.
    >
    > To put it mildly, any camera from Nikon or Canon that
    > was introduced later than early 2010 will produce
    > significantly better images than either a Canin 1DMII or
    > a Nikon D40.
    >
    >> Preferences: I am looking for something that is relatively light and
    >> would be usually coupled with a superzoom or a light prime. Not too
    >> fickle (D40 climbed Rainier and went on a few sea kayaking trips with
    >> me). Price is not a #1 consideration, but prefer to take it around and
    >> not feel too protective about it (for me, a $1000 camera would satisfy
    >> this, $5000 would not). Probably Canon - I have a couple of good Canon
    >> lenses that I could use with it. Low noise at daylight ISOs (say, up
    >> to 800) is crucial; good performance at higher ISO is nice, but not
    >> critical.

    >
    > I suspect that one of the recent Canon models would be
    > best for your purposes. I'm a Nikon user, so I can't
    > really suggest which Canon would best suit your
    > purposes.
    >
    > It also sounds, from your descriptions, as if another
    > low end Nikon would also be just about as useful. A
    > D3200 would produce better images, particularly if you
    > want to use a superzoom such as the 18-200mm. Nikon's
    > 18-200mm is reputed to be the best such lens available,
    > and the D3200 has a sensor that is equalled only by high
    > end models. Because of your more or less "single use"
    > pattern, the advantages of a D3200 might make it better
    > than a Canon. (Normally, for general purpose use, two
    > cameras that can use the same lenses would trump all
    > else.)
    >
    >> I am wary of high megapixel cameras -- one of the problems I saw with
    >> subcompacts was noise, which I think may be caused by a small sensor
    >> subdivided into lots of pixels. Is this a false assumption?

    >
    > Just be aware that starting with Nikon's release in 2008
    > of models like the D3 and D300 there has been a huge
    > jump in sensor technology that affects noise, dynamic
    > range, and higher ISO. And that increment was surpassed
    > with another jump in 2010 with newer models with even better
    > characteristics.
    >
    > Nikon has always tended toward better image quality at
    > lower pixel counts. So their best models up through
    > 2010 were all 12 MP sensors, but now the high end
    > cameras are 18MP for the D4 and 36MP for the D800, and
    > these cameras are unbeaten for high ISO, low noise, and
    > high dynamic range. The lower end models of course
    > aren't quite as good, but they also follow the trend.
    > (A current Nikon D3200 or D5100 would be significantly
    > better than the Canon 1D MII.)
    >
    > Here is a URL to a chart showing dyanmic range vs ISO, which
    > is probably the most useful bar to judge image quality from.
    >
    > http://home.comcast.net/~NikonD70/Charts/PDR.htm#D40,EOS 1D Mark II,D5100,D3200
    >
    > That graphs the Canon 1DMII, the Nikon D40, D5100, and
    > D3200. Other models, both from Canon and Nikon, can
    > significantly better the D5100 by as much again as it is
    > over the older models, but not at prices even close to
    > what you are interested in.
    >
    > Try clicking on different models shown in the list on
    > the right side to get other comparisons.
    >
    >> I will probably also get a superzoom (my 18-200 disappeared with the
    >> D40), so any recommendations on this are appreciated as well.

    >
    > That comment does tend to suggest that a Nikon D3200 or
    > D5100 plus the Nikkor 18-200mm superzoom would provide
    > the best images for the purpose you have. Weight that
    > carefully against the general advantages though of
    > having two bodies that use the same lenses, and in
    > particular because the latest low end Canon models will
    > also produce significantly better results at anything
    > other than the lowest ISO settings. A modern low end
    > Canon body might even cause you to stop using the older
    > 1D completely!
    >


    The only issue I have with your mostly accurate comments are that my
    18-200 Zoom was not a great lens. Mine produced low contrast, soft
    images. It was OK as a walk around lens, for taking snapshots, and
    family pictures, but that's about it.

    If budget permits, and weight is a serious consideration, I would
    consider a Leica B-lux. (Not a cheap camera, but produces excellent
    images, up to about 800 iSO)


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jul 3, 2013
    #1
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  2. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/3/2013 8:36 AM, Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > PeterN <> wrote:
    >> On 7/2/2013 11:29 PM, Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    >>> [...] particularly if you
    >>> want to use a superzoom such as the 18-200mm. Nikon's
    >>> 18-200mm is reputed to be the best such lens available,
    >>> [...]

    >
    >> The only issue I have with your mostly accurate comments
    >> are that my 18-200 Zoom was not a great lens.

    >
    > Note that my rather accurate assessment of the 18-200mm
    > in no way shape or form suggested it was a "great lens"!
    > It's just the best 18-200mm superzoom around, which means
    > it is still a relatively poor lens.
    >
    > I've personally never owned one because of that.
    >
    >> Mine
    >> produced low contrast, soft images. It was OK as a walk
    >> around lens, for taking snapshots, and family pictures,
    >> but that's about it.

    >
    > That is exactly what a superzoom is well known to be.
    >
    > I use a 24-120mm f/4G lens, and while I would really
    > like a wider zoom range, I just can't live with the
    > lower quality.


    For wide angle work on my D800. I make do with my old Nikkor 20mm as a
    fixed lens and 12-24 DX. I have even used my 10.5 semi fisheye.
    I have not yet decided whether I will get a replacement, but if I do, it
    will most likely be the 16-35. The 14-24 is better glass, butis a lot
    heavier and will not accept filters, so I cannot use it for long
    exposures. (Yes I know I can get an adapter and a series of ND filters.
    But, I'm not sure that is a practical solution for me.


    >
    >> If budget permits, and weight is a serious
    >> consideration, I would consider a Leica B-lux. (Not a
    >> cheap camera, but produces excellent images, up to about
    >> 800 iSO)

    >
    > I'm not sure which camera you are referring to, as I
    > can't find anything about a Leica B-Lux and there are
    > both V-Lux and D-Lux models (none of which I'm at all
    > familiar with). Assuming you mean a Leica V-Lux 4,
    > which has a 24x zoom... I think I'd stick with either
    > the Nikon or the Canon.
    >


    Oops. I meant the D-Lux. I agree about the V-Lux.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jul 3, 2013
    #2
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