Re: Listen to me

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Frisbee®, Aug 14, 2006.

  1. Frisbee®

    Frisbee® Guest

    What are you, my wife?
     
    Frisbee®, Aug 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    --
    ------------------
    guess, what is it?


    "Frisbee®" wrote:

    > What are you, my wife?
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?T1RITUFO?=, Aug 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. Frisbee®

    Frisbee® Guest

    "OTHMAN" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    > --
    > ------------------
    > guess, what is it?


    I'm sorry, did you say something?

    Mr. Smrat
     
    Frisbee®, Aug 14, 2006
    #3
  4. I ment (sucpuri )
    --
    ------------------
    guess, what is it?


    "Frisbee®" wrote:

    > "OTHMAN" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    > > --
    > > ------------------
    > > guess, what is it?

    >
    > I'm sorry, did you say something?
    >
    > Mr. Smrat
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?T1RITUFO?=, Aug 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Frisbee®

    Jtyc Guest

    > do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    > guess, what is it?



    The letter y?
     
    Jtyc, Aug 14, 2006
    #5
  6. --
    ------------------
    guess, what is it?


    "Jtyc" wrote:

    > > do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    > > guess, what is it?

    >
    >
    > The letter y?


    you tell me, I am asking
     
    =?Utf-8?B?T1RITUFO?=, Aug 14, 2006
    #6
  7. Frisbee®

    BD [MCNGP] Guest

    >>Did you see what OTHMAN () graced us
    with in ?<<
    >
    >>> do you know the difference between sex and sexy? Mr Smart
    >>> guess, what is it?

    >>
    >>
    >> The letter y?

    >
    > you tell me, I am asking
    >

    Y?
    --
    BD
    MCNGP #51
    -- MCNGP.com - You know IT!?
    -- www.CertGuard.com; www.SWPPM.com
     
    BD [MCNGP], Aug 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Frisbee®

    JaR Guest

    On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 08:21:48 -0700, Jtyc cast into the ether:

    >
    > The letter y?


    Without it, you'd only be a Jtc!

    --
    JaR
    MCNGP 22
    Here there be dragons
    Remove hat to reply
     
    JaR, Aug 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Frisbee®

    Jtyc Guest

    > Without it, you'd only be a Jtc!

    That's not nearly as cool.
     
    Jtyc, Aug 14, 2006
    #9
  10. lets talk about the letter "Y" as you mentioned earlier.

    Y:
    The 25th letter of the modern English alphabet.
    Any of the speech sounds represented by the letter y.
    The 25th in a series.
    Something shaped like the letter Y.

    Y:
    Y is the twenty-fifth letter of the Latin alphabet. Its name in English is
    wy, sometimes spelled wye (both pronounced [waɪ]).

    History
    The original ancestor of Y was the Semitic letter Waw, which was also the
    ultimate origin of the modern letters F, U, V, and W. See F for details.

    In Ancient Greek, Υψιλον (Ypsilon) was pronounced IPA /u/, then later on as
    /y/ — a 'rounded' vowel similar to that in the word 'few'. The Romans had
    already borrowed this as the letter V, to represent both the vowel /u/ as
    well as the consonant /w/, but in later times, because the pronunciation of
    Ypsilon in Greek had shifted to /y/, they borrowed it directly in its
    original form, stem and all, as Y — mainly to represent names and words taken
    from Greek.

    The letter Y was used in Old English, as in Latin, with the value /y/;
    however, some claim that this use was an independent invention in England
    created by stacking a V and an I, unrelated to the Latin use of the letter.
    Regardless, it is fairly likely that the letter, although technically named Y
    Græca (pronounced [u graɪka]) meaning 'Greek u' in contradistinction from
    native Latin /u/, came to be analyzed as the letter V (pronounced [uË]) atop
    the letter I (pronounced [i:]). The letter was thus referred to as [uË iË],
    which after [uË] became the glide [w] and after English's Great Vowel Shift
    naturally became [waɪ].

    By Middle English, [y] had lost its roundedness and become , and Y came
    to be used with the same values as I, [iË] and [ɪ] and [j]. Those dialects
    that retained [y] spelled it with U, under French influence.

    The Modern English use of Y is a direct continuation of this Middle English
    use. Thus the words myth [of Greek origin] and gift [of Old English origin],
    which originally contained high front rounded vowels, both have [ɪ].

    With the introduction of printing, the letter Y was used by Caxton and other
    printers in England to represent the letter thorn (Þ, þ) which was lacking
    from continental typefaces, resulting in the use of ye for the word the.

    Usage
    In Spanish, Y is called i griega, in Catalan i grega, in Polish igrek, in
    French i grec - all meaning "Greek i"; in most other European languages the
    Greek name is still used; in German and in Portuguese, for example, it's
    called ypsilon. The letter Y was originally established as a vowel. In the
    standard English language, the letter Y is traditionally regarded as a
    consonant (as depicted in American game show Wheel of Fortune), but as a
    survey of almost any English text, including this one, will show, Y more
    commonly functions as a vowel. In many cases, it is known as a semivowel.

    Originally, Y was a vowel letter in Greek, representing and later on,
    front rounded [y], becoming in Modern Greek.

    In English morphology, -y is a diminutive suffix.

    Other Germanic and Scandinavian Languages
    When not serving as the second vowel in a diphthong, it has the sound value
    [y] in German, in Finnish, and the Scandinavian languages, where it can never
    be a consonant. But in diphthongs, as in the name name Meyer, it serves as a
    variant of "i".

    In Dutch, Y appears only in loanwords and names and is usually pronounced
    . It is often left out of the Dutch alphabet and replaced with the "letter
    IJ". In Afrikaans, a development of Dutch, Y denotes the diphthong [EI],
    probably as a result of mixing lower case i and y or may derive from the IJ
    ligature.

    Spanish
    In the Spanish language, Y was used as a word-initial form of I that was
    more visible. (German has used J in a similar way.) Hence el Yugo y las
    Flechas was a symbol sharing the initials of Isabella I of Castile (Ysabel)
    and Ferdinand II of Aragon. This spelling was reformed by the Royal Spanish
    Academy and currently is only found in proper names spelt archaicly, such as
    Ybarra or CYII, the symbol of the Canal de Isabel II. X is also still used in
    Spanish with a different sound in some archaisms.

    Appearing alone as a word, the letter Y means "and" in Spanish. It is
    pronounced as "EE" is in English (in the IPA its sound is written ). In
    Spanish family names, an y (meaning "and") can separate the father's surname
    from the mother's surname as in "Santiago Ramón y Cajal". Catalan names use i
    for this.

    Other Languages
    Italian, too, has Y only in very few loanwords. In Polish and Guaraní, it
    represents the close central unrounded vowel.

    In contrast, in the Latin transcription of Nenets (Nyenec) the letter "y"
    palatalizes the preceding consonant. The letter Y nicely shows how letters
    change their function.

    When used as a vowel in Vietnamese, the letter y represents the close front
    unrounded vowel. When used as a monophthong, it is functionally equivalent to
    the Vietnamese letter i. Thus, Mỹ Lai does not rhyme but mỳ Lee does. There
    have been efforts to replace all such uses with i altogether, but they have
    been largely unsuccessful.

    --
    ------------------
    Y. me
     
    =?Utf-8?B?T1RITUFO?=, Aug 14, 2006
    #10
  11. Frisbee®

    BD [MCNGP] Guest

    >>Did you see what OTHMAN () graced us
    with in ?<<
    > lets talk about the letter "Y" as you mentioned earlier.
    >



    ( . Y . )


    --
    BD
    MCNGP #51
    -- MCNGP.com - You know IT!?
    -- www.CertGuard.com; www.SWPPM.com
     
    BD [MCNGP], Aug 14, 2006
    #11
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