Re: Limiting Broadband Speed?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by - Bobb -, Nov 21, 2008.

  1. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the computers
    > on your home network? Any kind of software that can do this so that
    > you can allocate more speed to the systems that need it and less to
    > those that don't?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > John


    How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure - speed.
     
    - Bobb -, Nov 21, 2008
    #1
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  2. - Bobb -

    Baron Guest

    John wrote:

    > On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:41:01 -0500, "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"John" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the
    >>> computers on your home network? Any kind of software that can do
    >>> this so that you can allocate more speed to the systems that need it
    >>> and less to those that don't?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> John

    >>
    >>How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    >>Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    >>Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure -
    >>speed.

    >
    >
    > When I go to the network card properties in device manager and click
    > the advanced tab and speed/duplex settings I have a few options:
    >
    > Full autonegotiation
    > Force 100 Half Duplex
    > Force 100 Full Duplex
    > Force 10 Half Duplex
    > Force 10 Full Duplex
    > Autonegotiate for 10HD
    >
    > I'm not quite sure what any of this means? I'm guessing the Force 100
    > is 100mbps speed of the ethernet and Force 10 would be 10mbps? Not
    > sure what the Full and Half duplex part is? And also not sure what
    > effect it would have on limiting the broadband speed and bandwidth if
    > I change it to any of the Force 10's?
    >
    > There is also another option to optimise for CPU or throughput?
    >
    > Thanks for your help,
    >
    > John


    There's no point ! Your modem is never going to give you data faster
    than your connection can supply it. Limiting overall network speed is
    not the way to control bandwidth allocation to particular machines.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Nov 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. "Baron" <> wrote in message
    news:ggu5nq$pth$...
    > John wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:41:01 -0500, "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"John" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the
    >>>> computers on your home network? Any kind of software that can do
    >>>> this so that you can allocate more speed to the systems that need it
    >>>> and less to those that don't?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>>How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    >>>Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    >>>Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure -
    >>>speed.

    >>
    >>
    >> When I go to the network card properties in device manager and click
    >> the advanced tab and speed/duplex settings I have a few options:
    >>
    >> Full autonegotiation
    >> Force 100 Half Duplex
    >> Force 100 Full Duplex
    >> Force 10 Half Duplex
    >> Force 10 Full Duplex
    >> Autonegotiate for 10HD
    >>
    >> I'm not quite sure what any of this means? I'm guessing the Force 100
    >> is 100mbps speed of the ethernet and Force 10 would be 10mbps? Not
    >> sure what the Full and Half duplex part is? And also not sure what
    >> effect it would have on limiting the broadband speed and bandwidth if
    >> I change it to any of the Force 10's?
    >>
    >> There is also another option to optimise for CPU or throughput?
    >>
    >> Thanks for your help,
    >>
    >> John

    >
    > There's no point ! Your modem is never going to give you data faster
    > than your connection can supply it. Limiting overall network speed is
    > not the way to control bandwidth allocation to particular machines.
    >


    I am trying to make the same point, the bandwidth demands on the broadband
    system -- his neighbors -- are making a much bigger impact on his Internet
    feed than the other machines in his house.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 30, 2008
    #3
  4. - Bobb -

    Baron Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:

    >
    > "Baron" <> wrote in message
    > news:ggu5nq$pth$...
    >> John wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:41:01 -0500, "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>"John" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>> Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the
    >>>>> computers on your home network? Any kind of software that can do
    >>>>> this so that you can allocate more speed to the systems that need
    >>>>> it and less to those that don't?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> John
    >>>>
    >>>>How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    >>>>Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    >>>>Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure -
    >>>>speed.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> When I go to the network card properties in device manager and click
    >>> the advanced tab and speed/duplex settings I have a few options:
    >>>
    >>> Full autonegotiation
    >>> Force 100 Half Duplex
    >>> Force 100 Full Duplex
    >>> Force 10 Half Duplex
    >>> Force 10 Full Duplex
    >>> Autonegotiate for 10HD
    >>>
    >>> I'm not quite sure what any of this means? I'm guessing the Force
    >>> 100 is 100mbps speed of the ethernet and Force 10 would be 10mbps?
    >>> Not sure what the Full and Half duplex part is? And also not sure
    >>> what effect it would have on limiting the broadband speed and
    >>> bandwidth if I change it to any of the Force 10's?
    >>>
    >>> There is also another option to optimise for CPU or throughput?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for your help,
    >>>
    >>> John

    >>
    >> There's no point ! Your modem is never going to give you data faster
    >> than your connection can supply it. Limiting overall network speed
    >> is not the way to control bandwidth allocation to particular
    >> machines.
    >>

    >
    > I am trying to make the same point, the bandwidth demands on the
    > broadband system -- his neighbors -- are making a much bigger impact
    > on his Internet feed than the other machines in his house.


    I agree with you ! I've a bloke round the corner who continously runs
    torrents of vids. He uses the same ISP as me, the same Exchange and is
    on the same pole. I struggle to get 4 - 4.5 Mb but when he fires up
    I'm lucky to get 2.5 or 3 Mb.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Nov 30, 2008
    #4
  5. "dennis meissner" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:ggui7m$3ev$...
    >>
    >> "Baron" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ggu5nq$pth$...
    >>> John wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:41:01 -0500, "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"John" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:...
    >>>>>> Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the
    >>>>>> computers on your home network? Any kind of software that can do
    >>>>>> this so that you can allocate more speed to the systems that need it
    >>>>>> and less to those that don't?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> John
    >>>>>
    >>>>>How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    >>>>>Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    >>>>>Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure -
    >>>>>speed.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> When I go to the network card properties in device manager and click
    >>>> the advanced tab and speed/duplex settings I have a few options:
    >>>>
    >>>> Full autonegotiation
    >>>> Force 100 Half Duplex
    >>>> Force 100 Full Duplex
    >>>> Force 10 Half Duplex
    >>>> Force 10 Full Duplex
    >>>> Autonegotiate for 10HD
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm not quite sure what any of this means? I'm guessing the Force 100
    >>>> is 100mbps speed of the ethernet and Force 10 would be 10mbps? Not
    >>>> sure what the Full and Half duplex part is? And also not sure what
    >>>> effect it would have on limiting the broadband speed and bandwidth if
    >>>> I change it to any of the Force 10's?
    >>>>
    >>>> There is also another option to optimise for CPU or throughput?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks for your help,
    >>>>
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>> There's no point ! Your modem is never going to give you data faster
    >>> than your connection can supply it. Limiting overall network speed is
    >>> not the way to control bandwidth allocation to particular machines.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I am trying to make the same point, the bandwidth demands on the
    >> broadband system -- his neighbors -- are making a much bigger impact on
    >> his Internet feed than the other machines in his house.

    >
    > If he is being affected by his neighbor's activity then it could probably
    > be assumed he is on a cable network. If this is the problem maybe the OP
    > should consider DSL ? Since this is a "point to point" or "star
    > configuration" there is minimal impact from neighbor's useage.
    >
    > Now that I think about it... I don't think the OP mentioned what kind of
    > service he had (unless I missed a message which happens from time to time)
    > But again, if he wants a sustained bandwidth then DSL is a better choice.
    >
    > But from the OP's original message it sounds like he merely wants to be
    > able to limit the useage of bandwidth across his local machines... if
    > this is still the case he may want to look into a router that has QoS
    > capabilities.
    >


    I read into his question that he is concerned that his own machines are
    affecting his QoS, and he specified in his Subject Line that he's on
    broadband, I assume it to be cable.

    I'm trying to get to the issue that since he's on broadband, then his
    neighbors are affecting his QoS to a greater degree than his other machines
    in his house.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 30, 2008
    #5
  6. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "dennis meissner" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    John wrote:
    Is there any way to limit the broadband speed to one of the
    computers on your home network? Any kind of software that can do
    this so that you can allocate more speed to the systems that need it
    and less to those that don't?
    Thanks,
    John

    >>> Bob wrote -
    >>>How about just changing the settings for that one network card ?
    >>>Rather than Auto ( default), just choose slower speed .
    >>>Control Panel - Network - choose card - properties - configure -
    >>>speed.
    >>>
    >>>> When I go to the network card properties in device manager and click
    >>>> the advanced tab and speed/duplex settings I have a few options:
    >>>>
    >>>> Full autonegotiation
    >>>> Force 100 Half Duplex
    >>>> Force 100 Full Duplex
    >>>> Force 10 Half Duplex
    >>>> Force 10 Full Duplex
    >>>> Autonegotiate for 10HD
    >>>>

    >
    > The whole thing sounds like he wants to limit network traffic on one or
    > two pc's on his own network. So when possibly one of his teenagers is
    > either streaming video or downloading music, the preset limited ones
    > would have a smaller portion of his total bandwidth. Thus during these
    > times of his teenagers hogging up all the bandwidth they would be using
    > less and give him more for more noble things like GAMING... ok maybe not.
    >
    > Dennis
    >


    I agree. Not an ISP issue - a local network issue. If your son (I'll call
    him JOE) slows down the other PCs in the house when JOE is downloading a 5gb
    video file, then make Joe's PC slower. Go to Joe's PC , set the network card
    to be " Force 10 Full Duplex" . ( I've have not used half-duplex since
    early dial-up modems ( in the 1980's) so unsure of results on a network
    card.)

    John, for the moment think of megabits per second as miles per hour. This
    isn't exactly correct, but just to explain the concept....
    Currently you have a one lane road from the internet provider into your
    house.
    Joe's PC is sending and receiving data at 100,000 miles per hour, so the
    road is always busy. Others can transmit/receive whenever JOE is not using
    the road. If you can slow down Joe's traffic, then more room on the road for
    other cars. ( That IS what you want , right ?)

    Currently Joe's PC is using 100mb Full duplex and going as fast as it can.
    If you made it 10mbs, it would (theoretically) take JOE 10 times longer to
    receive his info, but would free up the road for the other PC's - which is
    what you want.
    Also inside the router you can elect how much of a buffer to use, so that
    the ROUTER would handle the delay but that's a bit more complicated - check
    your router manual/website for details on INCREASING THE BUFFER SIZE.

    Full duplex means it will transmit data one block after another and will
    allow "so much time" for the other end to " acknowledge" each block sent. It
    doesn't wait for the reply, but it tracks them and if no reply within a
    certain period - you'll get a "timeout" error.

    Half duplex means :
    SEND (or RECEIVE) data
    WAIT for reply from recipient, then
    SEND (or RECEIVE) more data, repeat process.
    It slows down the line so others can share and insures each delivery.
     
    - Bobb -, Dec 1, 2008
    #6
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