Re: Let's try this again...what's the best site to help down grade Vista to XP?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by VanguardLH, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Lookout wrote:

    > And no..I'm not interested in any other OS.
    > The user is not very computer literate so it must be step by step.


    Vista is a suite of different versions with different feature sets.
    "Vista" by itself says nothing about WHICH version from which you want
    to downgrade. You can only use the downgrade rights if:

    - You have an OEM license of Vista.
    - You have the Business or Ultimate version of Windows Vista.

    Because you didn't bother to mention which version of Vista you (or
    they) have, I'm guessing you/they have the Home version which means you
    cannot downgrade. Go read:

    http://download.microsoft.com/downl...cbd-699b0c164182/royaltyoemreferencesheet.pdf
    http://download.microsoft.com/downl...9d-4996-b198-7b9d3fe15611/downgrade_chart.doc

    Same advice as you got before but with some additions:

    - Save all your data files. The user/owner should already be doing
    regular backups. If you don't backup, you deem your data as worthless
    or easily reproducible.

    - Insert the Windows XP installation CD and boot using it.

    - In the XP setup, select to format the old OS partition (i.e., wipe
    your old OS from the drive).

    - Complete the XP install. Because you will be using the Vista license
    to downgrade to the XP license, the source CD for XP can be your
    friend's CD, a CD for XP you installed elsewhere, or wherever you can
    find the install CD. Microsoft doesn't include the XP CD and tells you
    to "find" it elsewhere - but you don't have to buy it.

    - To activate the XP install, run the activation wizard and call the
    telephone number provided. Tell them you are doing the Vista-to-XP
    downgrade. They will need the product key from the Vista license to
    generate a new product key that you use for the now installed XP. Make
    sure to record that product key as it won't match the Vista sticker on
    the computer.

    It boils down to the same advice you got before: wipe the old OS,
    install the new OS, and activate by phone.
    VanguardLH, Dec 10, 2008
    #1
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  2. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Guest

    Lookout wrote:

    > On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 07:05:36 -0600, VanguardLH <> wrote:
    >
    >>Lookout wrote:
    >>
    >>> And no..I'm not interested in any other OS.
    >>> The user is not very computer literate so it must be step by step.

    >>
    >>Vista is a suite of different versions with different feature sets.
    >>"Vista" by itself says nothing about WHICH version from which you want
    >>to downgrade. You can only use the downgrade rights if:
    >>
    >>- You have an OEM license of Vista.
    >>- You have the Business or Ultimate version of Windows Vista.
    >>
    >>Because you didn't bother to mention which version of Vista you (or
    >>they) have, I'm guessing you/they have the Home version which means you
    >>cannot downgrade. Go read:
    >>
    >>http://download.microsoft.com/downl...cbd-699b0c164182/royaltyoemreferencesheet.pdf
    >>http://download.microsoft.com/downl...9d-4996-b198-7b9d3fe15611/downgrade_chart.doc
    >>
    >>Same advice as you got before but with some additions:
    >>
    >>- Save all your data files. The user/owner should already be doing
    >>regular backups. If you don't backup, you deem your data as worthless
    >>or easily reproducible.
    >>
    >>- Insert the Windows XP installation CD and boot using it.
    >>
    >>- In the XP setup, select to format the old OS partition (i.e., wipe
    >>your old OS from the drive).
    >>
    >>- Complete the XP install. Because you will be using the Vista license
    >>to downgrade to the XP license, the source CD for XP can be your
    >>friend's CD, a CD for XP you installed elsewhere, or wherever you can
    >>find the install CD. Microsoft doesn't include the XP CD and tells you
    >>to "find" it elsewhere - but you don't have to buy it.
    >>
    >>- To activate the XP install, run the activation wizard and call the
    >>telephone number provided. Tell them you are doing the Vista-to-XP
    >>downgrade. They will need the product key from the Vista license to
    >>generate a new product key that you use for the now installed XP. Make
    >>sure to record that product key as it won't match the Vista sticker on
    >>the computer.
    >>
    >>It boils down to the same advice you got before: wipe the old OS,
    >>install the new OS, and activate by phone.

    >
    > Thanks for the simple answer. I have no idea what version of Vista he
    > has but I'll find out. I had heard there are driver problems and that
    > was my main concern. I don't know if he's capable of figuring problems
    > out as he installs XP. I DON'T want to get any more involved other
    > than pointing him to a site where he can figure it out for himself.
    >
    > Thanks again


    Many if the pre-build manufacturers are designing Vista-specific boxes.
    That is, their software configuration is setup to run Vista and the
    drivers to support all the hardware in the box will be Vista drivers.
    When downgrading from Vista to XP, you do the *same* research an
    whenever you change to a different version of the OS or move to a
    completely different OS: check if drivers exist for that OS. If the
    hardmaker doesn't provide drivers that specifically support that OS or
    have compatible drivers, you will lose access to that hardware or have
    reduced functionality for that hardware. Downgrading is not the issue.
    You also check driver availability when you upgrade. You also check
    driver availability when you change to a different OS, like moving from
    Windows to Linux or visa versa.

    For pre-builts that come with Vista pre-installed using an image for
    that particular model from that manufacturer, they provide all the
    drivers for that particular platform. They may not support changing
    that platform, like changing the OS or its version. That's why a
    typical response by retailers is that the pre-built is designed for
    Vista and may not work or be fully functional with a different [version
    of] the OS.

    If the host owner doesn't do the investigation to ensure the migration
    is possible, they WILL have problems.
    VanguardLH, Dec 10, 2008
    #2
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  3. VanguardLH

    chuckcar Guest

    Lookout <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 07:05:36 -0600, VanguardLH <> wrote:
    >
    >>Lookout wrote:
    >>
    >>> And no..I'm not interested in any other OS.
    >>> The user is not very computer literate so it must be step by step.

    >>


    > Thanks for the simple answer. I have no idea what version of Vista he
    > has but I'll find out. I had heard there are driver problems and that
    > was my main concern. I don't know if he's capable of figuring problems
    > out as he installs XP. I DON'T want to get any more involved other
    > than pointing him to a site where he can figure it out for himself.
    >

    Ok, some relevant information. I would say then that this person has a
    "consumer computer"? In other words a Dell Inspiron, Compaq Pressario, IBM
    Aptiva, etc. These *require* that XP be installed from the Vista desktop
    due to the drivers/hardware being unique to the manufacturer and not
    compatible with MS Windows retail drivers. If there's *already* a problem
    with drivers, that probably means he has added hardware to the computer
    and then run the restore disk he got with it. This causes the restore to
    "hickup" and foul up the installation of the driver required. The restore
    *must* be done with only the original hardware the computer was built
    with. Then you can run the windows XP cd *in* windows, or better yet, get
    one from his computer manufacturer meant *for* his computer. This would be
    another restore disk more than likely and would have to be run the same
    way. Hardware that won't effect the restore process is limited to RAM,
    hard drives and monitors. Anything else is risking a foul-up.


    BTW when I mean hardware, included in that is *anything* extra - anything plugged
    into USB, PCMCIA, or Firewire plugs as well as any extra cards on the inside.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Dec 10, 2008
    #3
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