Re: Large hard drive NTFS vs FAT32

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Jeff Strickland, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. "James D. Andrews" <> wrote in message
    news:hp071l$1cjd$...
    >
    > "James D. Andrews" <> wrote in message
    > news:hoqvo1$j7m$...
    >> I'm coming across so much conflicting information out there with more
    >> details than I need. I'm not looking for NTFS vs. FAT32 pros & cons.
    >>
    >> Simply put: What is the maximum HDD size FAT32 can handle? If I get a
    >> 500GB-1TB drive, must I use NTFS?
    >>
    >> (Win XP)
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>
    >> --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---

    >
    >
    > The answer I was looking for (Thanks, Paul for a good link) was 127.5Gb.
    >
    > I'm looking at a 160Gb Hard Drive only showing 127Gb. It's FAT32. I
    > figured FAT 32 limitations were the problem, but my searches kept coming
    > up with conflicting or confusing information.
    >
    > Unfortunately, I don't have a spare HDD around (of adequate size) to do a
    > full backup before converting. My own HDD is near capacity so I can't use
    > mine. Hmmm. I'll figure something out.
    >


    The new drive will also format (NTFS) to the max of 137G, but once the
    initial partition is created, then format the remainder of the drive in one
    huge chunk. I have a 640G drive that formatted to 137G Drive C, and 503G
    Drive D.

    Don't wig-out about the numbers and the apparent lack of adding up. This
    happens because of the way they measure a byte. Think of New Math -- the
    result doesn't matter, just the process used to get there. New Math explains
    why the capacity is expressed as 137,433,751,552 bytes (127GB), and the Used
    Space and the Free Space can be added together to get the sum of 127.9GB.

    Install the new drive, format C to 137GB, and D to whatever is left over,
    then set the old HDD to be a Slave (you have to move the jumper) and copy
    your documents to the new drive, then wait a week or so to be sure you have
    all of the stuff you want, then reformat the old drive to wipe it clean. At
    the end of all of this, will boot to the new Drive C, have a partition for
    Drive D, and your old HDD set as an entirely different storage space, Drive
    E. Actually, the Drive E is dependent upon whether or not the drive letter
    is assigned already, or not. If it is assigned, then the old HDD will take
    the next available letter that hasn't been assigned.
    Jeff Strickland, Apr 1, 2010
    #1
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