Re: laptop turning itself off

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by JD, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. JD

    JD Guest

    JACK wrote:
    >
    > My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut down or
    > anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating although I can
    > hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome. How easy is it to
    > change the fan?
    > It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    > battery removed.


    Hi jack

    it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats quite
    a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and thats no easy
    task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the crud out, you can
    also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop sits on which
    have inbuilt fan's.

    I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or there
    could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the laptop if the
    power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go off, removing the
    battery while you use it from the mains is a good idea for the battery's
    lifespan but not so good if the power goes out.

    JD
    JD, Dec 23, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. JD

    Baron Guest

    JD Inscribed thus:

    > JACK wrote:
    >>
    >> My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut down
    >> or anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating although I
    >> can hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome. How easy is it
    >> to change the fan?
    >> It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    >> battery removed.

    >
    > Hi jack
    >
    > it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats
    > quite a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and thats
    > no easy task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the crud out,


    I agree your machine probably is overheating ! The fan is unlikely to
    be the problem insomuch as its the fluff that gets dragged into the fan
    and blown into the heat exchanger.

    Blowing air back into the outlet may remove most of the fluff by
    ejecting it back through the fan inlet. But take care not to cause any
    damage to the fan by using too much pressure.

    On some of these machines, I don't know the particular model you have,
    there is a removable panel that exposes the fan & heat exchanger. If
    there is, removing the panel will give limited access.
    Underneath there will be a self adhesive plastic cover between the fan
    outlet and the heat exchanger inlet. You can carefully lift one edge
    of this cover and pick the fluff out with tweezers.

    Do take anti static precautions if you decide to go this route.

    > you can also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop
    > sits on which have inbuilt fan's.
    >
    > I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or there
    > could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the laptop if
    > the power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go off, removing
    > the battery while you use it from the mains is a good idea for the
    > battery's lifespan but not so good if the power goes out.
    >
    > JD


    This is also very common ! The break if there is one, is most likely to
    be near the power plug, often between the choke and plug itself.

    It would also be wise to run the battery down and recharge it every few
    months, just to keep it in good condition. I've found that if the
    battery is allowed to discharge on its own, the battery gets so low
    that it will no longer charge up.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Dec 23, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Baron" <> wrote in message
    news:hgt0mf$4h2$-september.org...
    > JD Inscribed thus:
    >
    >> JACK wrote:
    >>>
    >>> My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut down
    >>> or anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating although I
    >>> can hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome. How easy is it
    >>> to change the fan?
    >>> It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    >>> battery removed.

    >>
    >> Hi jack
    >>
    >> it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats
    >> quite a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and thats
    >> no easy task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the crud out,

    >
    > I agree your machine probably is overheating ! The fan is unlikely to
    > be the problem insomuch as its the fluff that gets dragged into the fan
    > and blown into the heat exchanger.
    >
    > Blowing air back into the outlet may remove most of the fluff by
    > ejecting it back through the fan inlet. But take care not to cause any
    > damage to the fan by using too much pressure.
    >
    > On some of these machines, I don't know the particular model you have,
    > there is a removable panel that exposes the fan & heat exchanger. If
    > there is, removing the panel will give limited access.
    > Underneath there will be a self adhesive plastic cover between the fan
    > outlet and the heat exchanger inlet. You can carefully lift one edge
    > of this cover and pick the fluff out with tweezers.
    >
    > Do take anti static precautions if you decide to go this route.
    >
    >> you can also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop
    >> sits on which have inbuilt fan's.
    >>
    >> I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or there
    >> could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the laptop if
    >> the power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go off, removing
    >> the battery while you use it from the mains is a good idea for the
    >> battery's lifespan but not so good if the power goes out.
    >>
    >> JD

    >
    > This is also very common ! The break if there is one, is most likely to
    > be near the power plug, often between the choke and plug itself.
    >
    > It would also be wise to run the battery down and recharge it every few
    > months, just to keep it in good condition. I've found that if the
    > battery is allowed to discharge on its own, the battery gets so low
    > that it will no longer charge up.
    >


    Not to put too fine of a point on this, but the plug INSIDE of the computer
    also is a very common failure point, and the consensus is that this repair
    is costly and not relilable if done at home using the common tools that
    home-repair people would likely have.

    I have had 3 laptops in three months that came in with a broken power plug
    on the main board. I took one machine apart -- an old machine that came with
    Win98 on it -- to see if I could fix it for my nieces to use. I looked at
    one for a paying customer, and did not take it apart when I found the plug
    was toast, and looked at the third for a friend and attempted the repair. I
    do not have a suitable soldering iron to get the old plug out and the new
    plug in with any degree of certainty that the several layers on the board
    will be properly soldered. AND you have to find a plug that fits the plug on
    the power supply wire.

    My daugher has a laptop that had the wire break right where the wire goes
    into the plug. You have to buy a whole new power supply unless you have an
    electronics store in your town that sells obscure parts. Radio Shack does
    not have the correct size plug, but you could (theoretically) get a new male
    and female plug set and solder a new socket to the mother board, but see
    above for the problems you can encounter by going that route.

    I searched on Google for the part number printed ont he power supply, and
    found they are available for 20-ish dollars.
    Jeff Strickland, Dec 24, 2009
    #3
  4. JD

    Baron Guest

    Hi Jeff,
    Jeff Strickland Inscribed thus:

    >
    > "Baron" <> wrote in message
    > news:hgt0mf$4h2$-september.org...
    >> JD Inscribed thus:
    >>
    >>> JACK wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut
    >>>> down or anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating
    >>>> although I can hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome.
    >>>> How easy is it to change the fan?
    >>>> It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    >>>> battery removed.
    >>>
    >>> Hi jack
    >>>
    >>> it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats
    >>> quite a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and
    >>> thats no easy task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the
    >>> crud out,

    >>
    >> I agree your machine probably is overheating ! The fan is unlikely
    >> to be the problem insomuch as its the fluff that gets dragged into
    >> the fan and blown into the heat exchanger.
    >>
    >> Blowing air back into the outlet may remove most of the fluff by
    >> ejecting it back through the fan inlet. But take care not to cause
    >> any damage to the fan by using too much pressure.
    >>
    >> On some of these machines, I don't know the particular model you
    >> have, there is a removable panel that exposes the fan & heat
    >> exchanger. If there is, removing the panel will give limited access.
    >> Underneath there will be a self adhesive plastic cover between the
    >> fan
    >> outlet and the heat exchanger inlet. You can carefully lift one edge
    >> of this cover and pick the fluff out with tweezers.
    >>
    >> Do take anti static precautions if you decide to go this route.
    >>
    >>> you can also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop
    >>> sits on which have inbuilt fan's.
    >>>
    >>> I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or
    >>> there could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the
    >>> laptop if the power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go
    >>> off, removing the battery while you use it from the mains is a good
    >>> idea for the battery's lifespan but not so good if the power goes
    >>> out.
    >>>
    >>> JD

    >>
    >> This is also very common ! The break if there is one, is most likely
    >> to be near the power plug, often between the choke and plug itself.
    >>
    >> It would also be wise to run the battery down and recharge it every
    >> few months, just to keep it in good condition. I've found that if
    >> the battery is allowed to discharge on its own, the battery gets so
    >> low that it will no longer charge up.
    >>

    >
    > Not to put too fine of a point on this, but the plug INSIDE of the
    > computer also is a very common failure point, and the consensus is
    > that this repair is costly and not relilable if done at home using the
    > common tools that home-repair people would likely have.


    I completely agree ! It can be done as a home repair, but its not easy.

    > I have had 3 laptops in three months that came in with a broken power
    > plug on the main board. I took one machine apart -- an old machine
    > that came with Win98 on it -- to see if I could fix it for my nieces
    > to use. I looked at one for a paying customer, and did not take it
    > apart when I found the plug was toast, and looked at the third for a
    > friend and attempted the repair. I do not have a suitable soldering
    > iron to get the old plug out and the new plug in with any degree of
    > certainty that the several layers on the board will be properly
    > soldered. AND you have to find a plug that fits the plug on the power
    > supply wire.


    If you are going to do this kind of repair on a commercial basis then
    you need a source of the right components. This isn't an easy task to
    arrange either. I've seen manufacturers use different plugs & sockets
    on similar models. Having said that some standards are slowly
    emerging, particularly in this economic climate.

    > My daugher has a laptop that had the wire break right where the wire
    > goes into the plug. You have to buy a whole new power supply unless
    > you have an electronics store in your town that sells obscure parts.
    > Radio Shack does not have the correct size plug, but you could
    > (theoretically) get a new male and female plug set and solder a new
    > socket to the mother board, but see above for the problems you can
    > encounter by going that route.


    Actually I have used just that technique in order to complete a repair.

    > I searched on Google for the part number printed ont he power supply,
    > and found they are available for 20-ish dollars.


    Yes these parts can be very pricey ! But its down to how much work you
    are prepared to put in for the price you charge. You don't earn much
    sat on your butt doing nothing !

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Dec 25, 2009
    #4
  5. JD

    JD Guest

    Baron wrote:
    > Hi Jeff,
    > Jeff Strickland Inscribed thus:
    >
    >> "Baron" <> wrote in message
    >> news:hgt0mf$4h2$-september.org...
    >>> JD Inscribed thus:
    >>>
    >>>> JACK wrote:
    >>>>> My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut
    >>>>> down or anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating
    >>>>> although I can hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome.
    >>>>> How easy is it to change the fan?
    >>>>> It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    >>>>> battery removed.
    >>>> Hi jack
    >>>>
    >>>> it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats
    >>>> quite a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and
    >>>> thats no easy task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the
    >>>> crud out,
    >>> I agree your machine probably is overheating ! The fan is unlikely
    >>> to be the problem insomuch as its the fluff that gets dragged into
    >>> the fan and blown into the heat exchanger.
    >>>
    >>> Blowing air back into the outlet may remove most of the fluff by
    >>> ejecting it back through the fan inlet. But take care not to cause
    >>> any damage to the fan by using too much pressure.
    >>>
    >>> On some of these machines, I don't know the particular model you
    >>> have, there is a removable panel that exposes the fan & heat
    >>> exchanger. If there is, removing the panel will give limited access.
    >>> Underneath there will be a self adhesive plastic cover between the
    >>> fan
    >>> outlet and the heat exchanger inlet. You can carefully lift one edge
    >>> of this cover and pick the fluff out with tweezers.
    >>>
    >>> Do take anti static precautions if you decide to go this route.
    >>>
    >>>> you can also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop
    >>>> sits on which have inbuilt fan's.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or
    >>>> there could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the
    >>>> laptop if the power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go
    >>>> off, removing the battery while you use it from the mains is a good
    >>>> idea for the battery's lifespan but not so good if the power goes
    >>>> out.
    >>>>
    >>>> JD
    >>> This is also very common ! The break if there is one, is most likely
    >>> to be near the power plug, often between the choke and plug itself.
    >>>
    >>> It would also be wise to run the battery down and recharge it every
    >>> few months, just to keep it in good condition. I've found that if
    >>> the battery is allowed to discharge on its own, the battery gets so
    >>> low that it will no longer charge up.
    >>>

    >> Not to put too fine of a point on this, but the plug INSIDE of the
    >> computer also is a very common failure point, and the consensus is
    >> that this repair is costly and not relilable if done at home using the
    >> common tools that home-repair people would likely have.

    >
    > I completely agree ! It can be done as a home repair, but its not easy.
    >
    >> I have had 3 laptops in three months that came in with a broken power
    >> plug on the main board. I took one machine apart -- an old machine
    >> that came with Win98 on it -- to see if I could fix it for my nieces
    >> to use. I looked at one for a paying customer, and did not take it
    >> apart when I found the plug was toast, and looked at the third for a
    >> friend and attempted the repair. I do not have a suitable soldering
    >> iron to get the old plug out and the new plug in with any degree of
    >> certainty that the several layers on the board will be properly
    >> soldered. AND you have to find a plug that fits the plug on the power
    >> supply wire.

    >
    > If you are going to do this kind of repair on a commercial basis then
    > you need a source of the right components. This isn't an easy task to
    > arrange either. I've seen manufacturers use different plugs & sockets
    > on similar models. Having said that some standards are slowly
    > emerging, particularly in this economic climate.
    >
    >> My daugher has a laptop that had the wire break right where the wire
    >> goes into the plug. You have to buy a whole new power supply unless
    >> you have an electronics store in your town that sells obscure parts.
    >> Radio Shack does not have the correct size plug, but you could
    >> (theoretically) get a new male and female plug set and solder a new
    >> socket to the mother board, but see above for the problems you can
    >> encounter by going that route.

    >
    > Actually I have used just that technique in order to complete a repair.
    >
    >> I searched on Google for the part number printed ont he power supply,
    >> and found they are available for 20-ish dollars.

    >
    > Yes these parts can be very pricey ! But its down to how much work you
    > are prepared to put in for the price you charge. You don't earn much
    > sat on your butt doing nothing !
    >


    On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory, HDD's
    and software problems, anything that involves stripping the laptop's
    down I point them in the direction of a laptop specialist, its usually
    not worth the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.

    Merry Christmas!
    JD
    JD, Dec 25, 2009
    #5
  6. "JD" <> wrote in message
    news:4b3525bd$0$2491$...
    > Baron wrote:
    >> Hi Jeff,
    >> Jeff Strickland Inscribed thus:
    >>
    >>> "Baron" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:hgt0mf$4h2$-september.org...
    >>>> JD Inscribed thus:
    >>>>
    >>>>> JACK wrote:
    >>>>>> My Compaq 6735s laptop suddenly just switches off. doesn't shut
    >>>>>> down or anything, just goes off. I'm assuming it's overheating
    >>>>>> although I can hear the fan come on so other suggestions welcome.
    >>>>>> How easy is it to change the fan?
    >>>>>> It's used for about 14 hours a day, connected tot he mains with the
    >>>>>> battery removed.
    >>>>> Hi jack
    >>>>>
    >>>>> it could be overheating as you say, as for changing the fan thats
    >>>>> quite a big job you will need to dismantle the whole laptop and
    >>>>> thats no easy task, you can try using an "air duster" to blow the
    >>>>> crud out,
    >>>> I agree your machine probably is overheating ! The fan is unlikely
    >>>> to be the problem insomuch as its the fluff that gets dragged into
    >>>> the fan and blown into the heat exchanger.
    >>>>
    >>>> Blowing air back into the outlet may remove most of the fluff by
    >>>> ejecting it back through the fan inlet. But take care not to cause
    >>>> any damage to the fan by using too much pressure.
    >>>>
    >>>> On some of these machines, I don't know the particular model you
    >>>> have, there is a removable panel that exposes the fan & heat
    >>>> exchanger. If there is, removing the panel will give limited access.
    >>>> Underneath there will be a self adhesive plastic cover between the
    >>>> fan
    >>>> outlet and the heat exchanger inlet. You can carefully lift one edge
    >>>> of this cover and pick the fluff out with tweezers.
    >>>>
    >>>> Do take anti static precautions if you decide to go this route.
    >>>>
    >>>>> you can also get laptop coolers, these are metal plates the laptop
    >>>>> sits on which have inbuilt fan's.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'd also check that the power supply it may be going faulty, or
    >>>>> there could be a break in the wire as you have no battery in the
    >>>>> laptop if the power cuts out for even a second the laptop will go
    >>>>> off, removing the battery while you use it from the mains is a good
    >>>>> idea for the battery's lifespan but not so good if the power goes
    >>>>> out.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> JD
    >>>> This is also very common ! The break if there is one, is most likely
    >>>> to be near the power plug, often between the choke and plug itself.
    >>>>
    >>>> It would also be wise to run the battery down and recharge it every
    >>>> few months, just to keep it in good condition. I've found that if
    >>>> the battery is allowed to discharge on its own, the battery gets so
    >>>> low that it will no longer charge up.
    >>>>
    >>> Not to put too fine of a point on this, but the plug INSIDE of the
    >>> computer also is a very common failure point, and the consensus is
    >>> that this repair is costly and not relilable if done at home using the
    >>> common tools that home-repair people would likely have.

    >>
    >> I completely agree ! It can be done as a home repair, but its not easy.
    >>
    >>> I have had 3 laptops in three months that came in with a broken power
    >>> plug on the main board. I took one machine apart -- an old machine
    >>> that came with Win98 on it -- to see if I could fix it for my nieces
    >>> to use. I looked at one for a paying customer, and did not take it
    >>> apart when I found the plug was toast, and looked at the third for a
    >>> friend and attempted the repair. I do not have a suitable soldering
    >>> iron to get the old plug out and the new plug in with any degree of
    >>> certainty that the several layers on the board will be properly
    >>> soldered. AND you have to find a plug that fits the plug on the power
    >>> supply wire.

    >>
    >> If you are going to do this kind of repair on a commercial basis then
    >> you need a source of the right components. This isn't an easy task to
    >> arrange either. I've seen manufacturers use different plugs & sockets
    >> on similar models. Having said that some standards are slowly
    >> emerging, particularly in this economic climate.
    >>
    >>> My daugher has a laptop that had the wire break right where the wire
    >>> goes into the plug. You have to buy a whole new power supply unless
    >>> you have an electronics store in your town that sells obscure parts.
    >>> Radio Shack does not have the correct size plug, but you could
    >>> (theoretically) get a new male and female plug set and solder a new
    >>> socket to the mother board, but see above for the problems you can
    >>> encounter by going that route.

    >>
    >> Actually I have used just that technique in order to complete a repair.
    >>
    >>> I searched on Google for the part number printed ont he power supply,
    >>> and found they are available for 20-ish dollars.

    >>
    >> Yes these parts can be very pricey ! But its down to how much work you
    >> are prepared to put in for the price you charge. You don't earn much
    >> sat on your butt doing nothing !
    >>

    >
    > On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory, HDD's and
    > software problems, anything that involves stripping the laptop's down I
    > point them in the direction of a laptop specialist, its usually not worth
    > the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.
    >



    Exactly. Not only is the repair "iffy", the cost of doing it is going to be
    nearly as much as buying a new machine. First off, it's a bitch to get the
    machine apart and back together again, then removal and replacement of the
    power plug/jack is a job that does not lend itself to being easy with the
    kind of tool people will own at home, then there are multiple layers in the
    board that may ot may not solder properly, and you do not know if the repair
    works until you put the machine back together again -- which is listed
    earlier as a difficult task.

    By the time you pay for labor for the hours it takes to do this repair, but
    a little more money yu can have a new machine that in all liklihood is
    vastly superior to the one you are getting repaired.

    My advice,
    Pull the HDD and buy a case for it that converts it to a USB drive, plug the
    HDD into a new machine and copy your files to it and reformat it to be used
    as an external drive to store stuff on.

    If you like the old OS better than what comes with the new machines, then
    you can get a disk copy utility and move the current disk image to the new
    disk. This is a process that can be seriously problematic if you don't know
    what you're doing.
    Jeff Strickland, Dec 26, 2009
    #6
  7. JD

    - Bobb - Guest

    "JD" <> wrote in message news:4b3525bd$0$2491
    > On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory, HDD's and
    > software problems, anything that involves stripping the laptop's down I
    > point them in the direction of a laptop specialist, its usually not worth
    > the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.
    >
    > Merry Christmas!
    > JD


    If I might ask: any input on good vs. bad drives ?
    Family has a laptop where the hdd died. I was looking at BestBuy today and
    they had WD 2.5 IDE drives there, but I'm not keen on WD. All the Seagates
    were SATA, so I left empty-handed. My experience with WD was years ago - are
    they any better now ? Preference of drive ?
    It was an Hitachi Travelstar that died in there - 3 yrs old.
    - Bobb -, Dec 27, 2009
    #7
  8. "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:hh6nnk$5mc$-september.org...
    >
    > "JD" <> wrote in message news:4b3525bd$0$2491
    >> On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory, HDD's
    >> and software problems, anything that involves stripping the laptop's down
    >> I point them in the direction of a laptop specialist, its usually not
    >> worth the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.
    >>
    >> Merry Christmas!
    >> JD

    >
    > If I might ask: any input on good vs. bad drives ?
    > Family has a laptop where the hdd died. I was looking at BestBuy today and
    > they had WD 2.5 IDE drives there, but I'm not keen on WD. All the
    > Seagates were SATA, so I left empty-handed. My experience with WD was
    > years ago - are they any better now ? Preference of drive ?
    > It was an Hitachi Travelstar that died in there - 3 yrs old.
    >
    >


    My dahghter's HP laptop had a bad HDD, and I just did a Google search on the
    part number of the drive. This told me that the drive was part of a family
    of three different variants. I selected the largest in the family for the
    replacement and ordered it online. the price to the house was about $50. It
    works great. Of course, the other one worked great until it didn't ...
    Jeff Strickland, Dec 27, 2009
    #8
  9. JD

    Baron Guest

    - Bobb - Inscribed thus:

    >
    > "JD" <> wrote in message news:4b3525bd$0$2491
    >> On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory,
    >> HDD's and software problems, anything that involves stripping the
    >> laptop's down I point them in the direction of a laptop specialist,
    >> its usually not worth the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.
    >>
    >> Merry Christmas!
    >> JD

    >
    > If I might ask: any input on good vs. bad drives ?
    > Family has a laptop where the hdd died. I was looking at BestBuy today
    > and they had WD 2.5 IDE drives there, but I'm not keen on WD. All the
    > Seagates were SATA, so I left empty-handed. My experience with WD was
    > years ago - are they any better now ? Preference of drive ?
    > It was an Hitachi Travelstar that died in there - 3 yrs old.


    WD are one of the few remaining independent HDD manufacturers left.
    I won't give "Fujitsu" house room.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
    Baron, Dec 27, 2009
    #9
  10. JD

    JD Guest

    - Bobb - wrote:
    > "JD" <> wrote in message news:4b3525bd$0$2491
    >> On laptops I personally will only do screens, keyboards, memory, HDD's and
    >> software problems, anything that involves stripping the laptop's down I
    >> point them in the direction of a laptop specialist, its usually not worth
    >> the bother as laptops are so cheap nowadays.
    >>
    >> Merry Christmas!
    >> JD

    >
    > If I might ask: any input on good vs. bad drives ?
    > Family has a laptop where the hdd died. I was looking at BestBuy today and
    > they had WD 2.5 IDE drives there, but I'm not keen on WD. All the Seagates
    > were SATA, so I left empty-handed. My experience with WD was years ago - are
    > they any better now ? Preference of drive ?
    > It was an Hitachi Travelstar that died in there - 3 yrs old.
    >
    >

    it's all down to personal choice I guess, my 1st choice is WD's I've
    never had a problem with them, but I hear some people do, Maxtor's are
    the ones that usually fail on me, and maxtor and segate are the same
    company now.

    All HDD's are prone to failing tho as is anything with moving parts, you
    can now get SSD's (Solid State Drive's) these have there own problems
    (limited writes, before corruption, still a bit pricey tho you can get a
    64GB drive for £99)

    The Place I usually buy HD's from only stock 3 IDE HDD's, two of them
    are Samsungs and one is Western Digital, I like both Samsung and WD but
    the samsung is twice the size, same spin speed and cach so I'd go for
    the samsung as its only £2 more.

    JD
    JD, Dec 27, 2009
    #10
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