Re: Kodak - abandons AA?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Steven M. Scharf, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. "Trevor S" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns94CC6C7A33978billgatescom@130.133.1.4...
    > Ron Hunter <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Perhaps for those with a predictable lifestyle.

    >
    > They might better be know as those that can't plan more then 2 hours into
    > the future.
    >
    > > Many are more
    > > 'spontaneous' and don't plan every action weeks in advance.

    >
    > So for those "types" I would have thought a charged battery would be
    > derigeur... ie I have no idea what I am going to be doing in two hours so
    > I had better charge my camera battery or I may get caught out.
    >
    > Sounds to me a case of laziness, inepeitutde or the inablity to plan more
    > then not having an AA battery slot in a bit of equipment. Personally I
    > love the Li batteries, eg I went two weeks camping and touring in outback
    > Australia, days between towns (ie no ability to buy any AA batteries at a
    > corner store) let alone have access to mains electricity, with a single
    > battery for my SONY camcorder and never bothered to take a charger etc as

    I

    Keeping Li-Ion rechargeables ready to go is a lot easier than doing the same
    with NiMH AA cells. The NiMH batteries have a relatively high self-discharge
    rate. The sole advantage to AA cells is the ability to use alkaline cells in
    a pinch. Technically I could still do this with a Li-Ion powered
    camera--with an external AA battery pack.

    For backpacking, I'd greatly prefer Li-Ion, since I want to carry the least
    amount of weight and volume, and have everything at optimal efficiency.

    The camera makers are abandoning AA not to sell more battery packs, but
    because consumers want smaller devices, that go longer between recharges,
    and that can sit on a shelf for a week and still be ready for instant use.
    Steven M. Scharf, Apr 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. Steven M. Scharf

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Steven M. Scharf wrote:
    > "Trevor S" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94CC6C7A33978billgatescom@130.133.1.4...
    >
    >>Ron Hunter <> wrote in
    >>news::
    >>
    >><snip>
    >>
    >>>Perhaps for those with a predictable lifestyle.

    >>
    >>They might better be know as those that can't plan more then 2 hours into
    >>the future.
    >>
    >>
    >>>Many are more
    >>>'spontaneous' and don't plan every action weeks in advance.

    >>
    >>So for those "types" I would have thought a charged battery would be
    >>derigeur... ie I have no idea what I am going to be doing in two hours so
    >>I had better charge my camera battery or I may get caught out.
    >>
    >>Sounds to me a case of laziness, inepeitutde or the inablity to plan more
    >>then not having an AA battery slot in a bit of equipment. Personally I
    >>love the Li batteries, eg I went two weeks camping and touring in outback
    >>Australia, days between towns (ie no ability to buy any AA batteries at a
    >>corner store) let alone have access to mains electricity, with a single
    >>battery for my SONY camcorder and never bothered to take a charger etc as

    >
    > I
    >
    > Keeping Li-Ion rechargeables ready to go is a lot easier than doing the same
    > with NiMH AA cells. The NiMH batteries have a relatively high self-discharge
    > rate. The sole advantage to AA cells is the ability to use alkaline cells in
    > a pinch. Technically I could still do this with a Li-Ion powered
    > camera--with an external AA battery pack.
    >
    > For backpacking, I'd greatly prefer Li-Ion, since I want to carry the least
    > amount of weight and volume, and have everything at optimal efficiency.
    >
    > The camera makers are abandoning AA not to sell more battery packs, but
    > because consumers want smaller devices, that go longer between recharges,
    > and that can sit on a shelf for a week and still be ready for instant use.
    >
    >
    >

    My camera routinely sits for a few weeks at a time with NIMH batteries
    and has never caused a problem with self-discharge. The issue is
    severly overstated.
    Since I use the same AA NIMH batteries in my camera and my GPS, it is a
    great convenience to me. One which I am not interested in giving up.
    Ron Hunter, Apr 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. Steven M. Scharf

    Charlie Self Guest

    Ron Hunter responds:

    >> The camera makers are abandoning AA not to sell more battery packs, but
    >> because consumers want smaller devices, that go longer between recharges,
    >> and that can sit on a shelf for a week and still be ready for instant use.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >My camera routinely sits for a few weeks at a time with NIMH batteries
    >and has never caused a problem with self-discharge. The issue is
    >severly overstated.
    >Since I use the same AA NIMH batteries in my camera and my GPS, it is a
    >great convenience to me. One which I am not interested in giving up.
    >


    And a week is nonsense. If a set of AAs goes dead in a week, then they were
    nearly dischared already, or are about to fail. My camera sometimes sits for a
    month, is a notorious power hog (Minolta 7i) and will still clip off 75 or so
    frames, with flash, when picked up and used.

    Dropping 1% a day doesn't come close to creating problems in a week.

    Charlie Self
    "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our
    institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin
    Charlie Self, Apr 15, 2004
    #3
  4. Steven M. Scharf

    Ron Guest

    > My camera routinely sits for a few weeks at a time with NIMH batteries
    > and has never caused a problem with self-discharge. The issue is
    > severly overstated.
    > Since I use the same AA NIMH batteries in my camera and my GPS, it is a
    > great convenience to me. One which I am not interested in giving up.


    Even though I said that proprietary batteries were out of the question for
    me, I may have to eat those words even though I don't want to.

    Finding a camera that I can afford and like is becoming a problem. I haven't
    tried them all by any means but I am finding that the placement of controls
    and viewfinders just doesn't get along with me. I use my left eye at the
    viewfinder and for a lot of cameras the zoom control lever is right at my
    right eye stopping me from getting a good look through the viewfinder if I
    want to use the zoom. If I didn't wear glasses, this wouldn't be much of a
    problem but I wear bifocals and can't read any of the settings on any camera
    that I have so far seen without my glasses.

    I am doing some playing around trying to use my right eye to focus but it
    isn't comfortable at all.

    I did see the digital Rebel and just loved the manual zoom and focus ...
    just like my 35mm SLR. It's a very nice camera but at the very top of my
    price range though.

    Decisions, decisions, decisions.
    Ron, Apr 16, 2004
    #4
  5. Ron wrote:
    >>My camera routinely sits for a few weeks at a time with NIMH batteries
    >>and has never caused a problem with self-discharge. The issue is
    >>severly overstated.
    >>Since I use the same AA NIMH batteries in my camera and my GPS, it is a
    >>great convenience to me. One which I am not interested in giving up.

    >
    >
    > Even though I said that proprietary batteries were out of the question for
    > me, I may have to eat those words even though I don't want to.
    >
    > Finding a camera that I can afford and like is becoming a problem. I haven't
    > tried them all by any means but I am finding that the placement of controls
    > and viewfinders just doesn't get along with me. I use my left eye at the
    > viewfinder and for a lot of cameras the zoom control lever is right at my
    > right eye stopping me from getting a good look through the viewfinder if I
    > want to use the zoom. If I didn't wear glasses, this wouldn't be much of a
    > problem but I wear bifocals and can't read any of the settings on any camera
    > that I have so far seen without my glasses.
    >
    > I am doing some playing around trying to use my right eye to focus but it
    > isn't comfortable at all.
    >
    > I did see the digital Rebel and just loved the manual zoom and focus ...
    > just like my 35mm SLR. It's a very nice camera but at the very top of my
    > price range though.
    >
    > Decisions, decisions, decisions.
    >


    Sounds like you need a camera with a viewfinder on the right. Otherwise, I'd say
    all cameras are designed with right eye in mind.

    --
    Ben Thomas

    Apparently less than 10% of accidents are caused by drivers exceeding the speed
    limit.
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?BenOne=A9?=, Apr 18, 2004
    #5
  6. Steven M. Scharf

    Ron Guest

    "BenOneĀ©" <> wrote in message
    news:b1su5c.7e6.ln@192.168.11.2...
    > Ron wrote:
    > >>My camera routinely sits for a few weeks at a time with NIMH batteries
    > >>and has never caused a problem with self-discharge. The issue is
    > >>severly overstated.
    > >>Since I use the same AA NIMH batteries in my camera and my GPS, it is a
    > >>great convenience to me. One which I am not interested in giving up.

    > >
    > >
    > > Even though I said that proprietary batteries were out of the question

    for
    > > me, I may have to eat those words even though I don't want to.
    > >
    > > Finding a camera that I can afford and like is becoming a problem. I

    haven't
    > > tried them all by any means but I am finding that the placement of

    controls
    > > and viewfinders just doesn't get along with me. I use my left eye at the
    > > viewfinder and for a lot of cameras the zoom control lever is right at

    my
    > > right eye stopping me from getting a good look through the viewfinder if

    I
    > > want to use the zoom. If I didn't wear glasses, this wouldn't be much of

    a
    > > problem but I wear bifocals and can't read any of the settings on any

    camera
    > > that I have so far seen without my glasses.
    > >
    > > I am doing some playing around trying to use my right eye to focus but

    it
    > > isn't comfortable at all.
    > >
    > > I did see the digital Rebel and just loved the manual zoom and focus ...
    > > just like my 35mm SLR. It's a very nice camera but at the very top of my
    > > price range though.
    > >
    > > Decisions, decisions, decisions.
    > >

    >
    > Sounds like you need a camera with a viewfinder on the right. Otherwise,

    I'd say
    > all cameras are designed with right eye in mind.
    >
    > --
    > Ben Thomas


    I think that you are right. I have been practicing using my right eye and I
    think that I might be able to get used to it in time.
    --
    Ron
    If you don't look for the bright side, you'll never find it.
    Ron, Apr 19, 2004
    #6
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