Re Is APS Dead

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by robert w fischer, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. I know it has been a long time since Nikon has stopped in the making of
    The Pronada SLR Aps camera, but yet in some ways I still find the camera
    a gem to use, Yes I do own a ditigal camera, a small point and shoot,
    which I hope to advance upward to a DSLR by around Christmas but from
    time to time still like to use this camera Anyone out there have
    this camera and what would be your thoughts
    Thanks Bob
     
    robert w fischer, Nov 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. robert w fischer

    bmoag Guest

    I have one. The built-in flash died shortly after the warranty expired and I
    have not used it since.
    In all honesty the Pronea was a low-end film slr, regardless of the type of
    film it used.
    That does not mean that in the right hands it was incapable of decent
    results.
     
    bmoag, Nov 21, 2006
    #2
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  3. robert w fischer

    Matt Ion Guest

    bmoag wrote:
    > I have one. The built-in flash died shortly after the warranty expired and I
    > have not used it since.
    > In all honesty the Pronea was a low-end film slr, regardless of the type of
    > film it used.
    > That does not mean that in the right hands it was incapable of decent
    > results.


    I think APS has, for all intents and purposes, been a dead format for a long
    time - it never really caught on to any degree, and the advent of "affordable"
    digital pretty much took what little breath it had left.

    I have to admit, I really admired the idea: the film cannister has indicators
    showing the status of the film (un-used, partially exposed, fully exposed, and
    processed), I *believe* it supported automatic reload to the last next unexposed
    frame after mid-roll rewind, and storing the negative strip back in the
    cannister after processing is really brilliant. The switchable image formats
    were kinda gimmicky, but generally worked. The drop-in loading was the most
    friendly feature, of course.

    Alas, the smaller frame size doomed it to be relegated to consumer cameras,
    where's there's little markup and not the sort of profit to be made from gaining
    pro support - most of the "advantages" were for the convenience and ease-of-use
    by consumers and not really of any benefit to pros... along with the smaller
    frame, there really wasn't a selling point for the pro.
     
    Matt Ion, Nov 22, 2006
    #3
  4. robert w fischer

    silvercelt Guest

    I have old APS, hardly use it. They is talk of getting rid of all
    film, but that has to be mad, as so many (including pros) still use all
    type of film cameras. i know if something wrong with my camera no one
    would be able to fix it now, not even available to buy


    Matt Ion wrote:
    > bmoag wrote:
    > > I have one. The built-in flash died shortly after the warranty expired and I
    > > have not used it since.
    > > In all honesty the Pronea was a low-end film slr, regardless of the type of
    > > film it used.
    > > That does not mean that in the right hands it was incapable of decent
    > > results.

    >
    > I think APS has, for all intents and purposes, been a dead format for a long
    > time - it never really caught on to any degree, and the advent of "affordable"
    > digital pretty much took what little breath it had left.
    >
    > I have to admit, I really admired the idea: the film cannister has indicators
    > showing the status of the film (un-used, partially exposed, fully exposed, and
    > processed), I *believe* it supported automatic reload to the last next unexposed
    > frame after mid-roll rewind, and storing the negative strip back in the
    > cannister after processing is really brilliant. The switchable image formats
    > were kinda gimmicky, but generally worked. The drop-in loading was the most
    > friendly feature, of course.
    >
    > Alas, the smaller frame size doomed it to be relegated to consumer cameras,
    > where's there's little markup and not the sort of profit to be made from gaining
    > pro support - most of the "advantages" were for the convenience and ease-of-use
    > by consumers and not really of any benefit to pros... along with the smaller
    > frame, there really wasn't a selling point for the pro.
     
    silvercelt, Nov 22, 2006
    #4
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