Re: I think we should leave this group for P&S's

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ray, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. ray

    ray Guest

    On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 19:58:54 -0500, RichA wrote:

    > I know it's "digital" which encompasses all the cameras, but the
    > rec.photo.digital.slr-systems is more suited to DSLRs and people here
    > would be free to concentrate on P&S's for as long as their stomach's
    > stay strong.


    Sayonara - don't let the door hit you in the butt on the way out!
    Actually, the 'rec' in the title might give you a clue.
    ray, Dec 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. ray wrote:

    > On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 19:58:54 -0500, RichA wrote:
    >
    >> I know it's "digital" which encompasses all the cameras, but the
    >> rec.photo.digital.slr-systems is more suited to DSLRs and people here
    >> would be free to concentrate on P&S's for as long as their stomach's
    >> stay strong.

    >
    > Sayonara - don't let the door hit you in the butt on the way out!
    > Actually, the 'rec' in the title might give you a clue.


    Do you perceive the "rec" in rec.photo-digital.slr-systems to be a
    different "rec" than the one in rec.photo.digital?


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
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    Blinky the Shark, Dec 18, 2008
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  3. Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > ray wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 19:58:54 -0500, RichA wrote:
    >>
    >>> I know it's "digital" which encompasses all the cameras, but the
    >>> rec.photo.digital.slr-systems is more suited to DSLRs and people here
    >>> would be free to concentrate on P&S's for as long as their stomach's
    >>> stay strong.

    >>
    >> Sayonara - don't let the door hit you in the butt on the way out!
    >> Actually, the 'rec' in the title might give you a clue.

    >
    > Do you perceive the "rec" in rec.photo-digital.slr-systems to be a


    Make that "rec.photo.digital.slr-systems.

    > different "rec" than the one in rec.photo.digital?


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
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    Blinky the Shark, Dec 18, 2008
    #3
  4. ray

    Jurgen Guest

    HEMI-Powered wrote:
    > bugbear added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    > ...
    >
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_8_(Usenet)
    >>
    >> rec.* Recreation and entertainment
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt.*_hierarchy
    >>
    >>>> According to the "So You Want to Create an Alt Newsgroup"
    >>>> FAQ, the name "alt" is an acronym for "Anarchists,
    >>>> Lunatics, and Terrorists", though the acronym also refers
    >>>> to the fact that it is a "hierarchy that is 'alternative'
    >>>> to the 'mainstream'

    > As to the quote above, I doubt it is an acronym like that any more
    > than TIPS means "To Insure Prompt Service" or **** means "For
    > Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". However, it IS widely believed that the
    > etymology of posh, meaning "plush and luxurious" comes from "Port
    > Outbound, Starboard Inbound" referring to the way passengers on
    > sailing ships got preferred berthing according to where the ship
    > would be when docked and the way waves and prevailing winds tended
    > to rock the ship differently as perceived by a person in their
    > cabin.
    >
    > So, I was basically right that rec means recreational and alt means
    > alternate or alternative.
    >


    Bloody Hell!
    Such a wealth of information and from a Chrysler freak too!
    Jurgen, Dec 18, 2008
    #4
  5. ray

    tony cooper Guest

    On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 06:49:19 +1000, Jurgen <>
    wrote:

    >HEMI-Powered wrote:
    >> bugbear added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    >> ...
    >>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_8_(Usenet)
    >>>
    >>> rec.* Recreation and entertainment
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt.*_hierarchy
    >>>
    >>>>> According to the "So You Want to Create an Alt Newsgroup"
    >>>>> FAQ, the name "alt" is an acronym for "Anarchists,
    >>>>> Lunatics, and Terrorists", though the acronym also refers
    >>>>> to the fact that it is a "hierarchy that is 'alternative'
    >>>>> to the 'mainstream'

    >> As to the quote above, I doubt it is an acronym like that any more
    >> than TIPS means "To Insure Prompt Service" or **** means "For
    >> Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". However, it IS widely believed that the
    >> etymology of posh, meaning "plush and luxurious" comes from "Port
    >> Outbound, Starboard Inbound" referring to the way passengers on
    >> sailing ships got preferred berthing according to where the ship
    >> would be when docked and the way waves and prevailing winds tended
    >> to rock the ship differently as perceived by a person in their
    >> cabin.
    >>
    >> So, I was basically right that rec means recreational and alt means
    >> alternate or alternative.
    >>

    >
    >Bloody Hell!
    >Such a wealth of information and from a Chrysler freak too!


    He's right that "posh" is widely believed to be from "port outbound,
    starboard inbound", but there doesn't seem to be any support for that
    from people who research words and terms.

    I've been a subscriber to Michael Quinion's "WorldWideWords"
    newsletter for several years. Michael both researches word and term
    origins and publishes the research of others in this field. Here's
    Michael's article on "posh":
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-pos1.htm

    For those that can't be arsed to read it, it states in part: "The
    most probable solution — though unprovable because slang is so rarely
    written down — is that it comes from London street slang for money.
    This may well derive from Romany posh, half, originally applied to a
    halfpenny, then to any small sum of money, and then to money in
    general. This is recorded from as early as 1830 and was certainly
    still around in 1892."


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Dec 18, 2008
    #5
  6. HEMI-Powered wrote:

    > Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    > ...
    >
    >>> Sayonara - don't let the door hit you in the butt on the way out!
    >>> Actually, the 'rec' in the title might give you a clue.

    >>
    >> Do you perceive the "rec" in rec.photo-digital.slr-systems to be a
    >> different "rec" than the one in rec.photo.digital?
    >>

    > Blinky, what exactly does "rec" mean in these NGs, "recreational"? I
    > really don't know what "alt" means, either except maybe "alternate" or
    > something like that.


    Answered elsewhere. I'll ad that unlike alt, rec belongs to the Big
    Eight.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html
    Blinky the Shark, Dec 19, 2008
    #6
  7. ray

    Eric Stevens Guest

    On Thu, 18 Dec 2008 06:51:01 -0600, "HEMI-Powered" <>
    wrote:

    >bugbear added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    >...
    >
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_8_(Usenet)
    >>
    >> rec.* Recreation and entertainment
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt.*_hierarchy
    >>
    >> >> According to the "So You Want to Create an Alt Newsgroup"
    >> >> FAQ, the name "alt" is an acronym for "Anarchists,
    >> >> Lunatics, and Terrorists", though the acronym also refers
    >> >> to the fact that it is a "hierarchy that is 'alternative'
    >> >> to the 'mainstream'

    >>

    >As to the quote above, I doubt it is an acronym like that any more
    >than TIPS means "To Insure Prompt Service" or **** means "For
    >Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". However, it IS widely believed that the
    >etymology of posh, meaning "plush and luxurious" comes from "Port
    >Outbound, Starboard Inbound" referring to the way passengers on
    >sailing ships got preferred berthing according to where the ship
    >would be when docked and the way waves and prevailing winds tended
    >to rock the ship differently as perceived by a person in their
    >cabin.


    Actually, POSH was how to select the coolest side of the ship when
    travelling backwards and forwards between England and India.
    >
    >So, I was basically right that rec means recreational and alt means
    >alternate or alternative.




    Eric Stevens
    Eric Stevens, Dec 19, 2008
    #7
  8. ray

    Eric Stevens Guest

    On Thu, 18 Dec 2008 17:39:22 -0800, John Navas
    <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 14:32:01 +1300, Eric Stevens
    ><> wrote in
    ><>:
    >
    >>Actually, POSH was how to select the coolest side of the ship when
    >>travelling backwards and forwards between England and India.

    >
    >So many think, but it's not so -- see Wikipedia.


    Now you've made me go and look up the New Shorter Oxford English
    Dictionary (NSOED). It gives three main meanings (1) a small coin (2)
    Nonsense, Rubbish (3) Smart, stylish, luxurious etc. It goes on to say
    "There is no evidence to support ... 'Port Out, Starboard Home"



    Eric Stevens
    Eric Stevens, Dec 19, 2008
    #8
  9. ray

    DRS Guest

    "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9B79428084CB6ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30
    > Eric Stevens added these comments in the current discussion du
    > jour ...


    [...]

    >> Now you've made me go and look up the New Shorter Oxford
    >> English Dictionary (NSOED). It gives three main meanings (1)
    >> a small coin (2) Nonsense, Rubbish (3) Smart, stylish,
    >> luxurious etc. It goes on to say "There is no evidence to
    >> support ... 'Port Out, Starboard Home"
    >>

    > This was meant to be a joke on why I don't think that "alt" is an
    > acronym, but POSH does mean that, it is just debatable what the
    > words were meant to convey. The reason the dictionary doesn't
    > define "port outbound, starboard inbound" is that it doesn't
    > include obsolete definitions for terms and acronyms, only words
    > generally considered to be current. There are literally tens of
    > thousands of legitimate words in the English language that won't be
    > found in a standard dictionary no matter how think or how new, but
    > they can be found with some judicious Googling.


    The word is current and in the dictionary. It is a matter of etymology, not
    meaning (although the Oxford does provide many archaic meanings). My New
    Oxford says "There is no evidence to support the folk etymology that _posh_
    is formed from the initials of _port outbound, starboard home_ ..." I for
    one am confident in the Oxford's expertise and research.

    Now, do you have anything to say about photography?
    DRS, Dec 19, 2008
    #9
  10. ray

    DRS Guest

    "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9B7945CBA397FReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30
    > DRS added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...
    >> "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    >> news:Xns9B79428084CB6ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30


    [...]

    >>> This was meant to be a joke on why I don't think that "alt"
    >>> is an acronym, but POSH does mean that, it is just debatable
    >>> what the words were meant to convey. The reason the
    >>> dictionary doesn't define "port outbound, starboard inbound"
    >>> is that it doesn't include obsolete definitions for terms and
    >>> acronyms, only words generally considered to be current.
    >>> There are literally tens of thousands of legitimate words in
    >>> the English language that won't be found in a standard
    >>> dictionary no matter how think or how new, but they can be
    >>> found with some judicious Googling.

    >>
    >> The word is current and in the dictionary. It is a matter of
    >> etymology, not meaning (although the Oxford does provide many
    >> archaic meanings). My New Oxford says "There is no evidence
    >> to support the folk etymology that _posh_ is formed from the
    >> initials of _port outbound, starboard home_ ..." I for one am
    >> confident in the Oxford's expertise and research.

    >
    > I know the word is current, what I said what that tens of
    > thousands of words are obsolete and have been dropped from the
    > major dictionaries. What part of that don't you understand.


    That is not what you said. What you said is cited above. You said the
    reason "port outbound, starboard inbound" is not in the Oxford is because
    "it doesn't include obsolete definitions for terms and acronyms". The
    problem for you is that not only does the Oxford frequently give archaic
    meanings but it also always gives a word's etymology. In this instance, the
    prevalence of the myth to which you subscribe is so pervasive the editors
    felt it necessary to explicitly refute it.

    > Since I'm not in the business of either reasoning with fools nor
    > doing their research for them, if you want to believe just one
    > source instead of doing some independent research on your own, I
    > guess you will remain blissfully ignorant about POSH, and
    > probably about many other things.


    No reputable sources support your claim. That I cited one cannot be assumed
    to be exhaustive.

    >> Now, do you have anything to say about photography?
    >>

    > Yes. I have a nice picture of you that I found in another
    > newsgroup of a geek with a propeller on top his beanie. Would
    > that be you?


    Now you can look up "hoist on your own petard."
    DRS, Dec 19, 2008
    #10
  11. ray

    J. Clarke Guest

    DRS wrote:
    > "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9B79428084CB6ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30
    >> Eric Stevens added these comments in the current discussion du
    >> jour ...

    >
    > [...]
    >
    >>> Now you've made me go and look up the New Shorter Oxford
    >>> English Dictionary (NSOED). It gives three main meanings (1)
    >>> a small coin (2) Nonsense, Rubbish (3) Smart, stylish,
    >>> luxurious etc. It goes on to say "There is no evidence to
    >>> support ... 'Port Out, Starboard Home"
    >>>

    >> This was meant to be a joke on why I don't think that "alt" is an
    >> acronym, but POSH does mean that, it is just debatable what the
    >> words were meant to convey. The reason the dictionary doesn't
    >> define "port outbound, starboard inbound" is that it doesn't
    >> include obsolete definitions for terms and acronyms, only words
    >> generally considered to be current. There are literally tens of
    >> thousands of legitimate words in the English language that won't be
    >> found in a standard dictionary no matter how think or how new, but
    >> they can be found with some judicious Googling.

    >
    > The word is current and in the dictionary. It is a matter of
    > etymology, not meaning (although the Oxford does provide many
    > archaic
    > meanings). My New Oxford says "There is no evidence to support the
    > folk etymology that _posh_ is formed from the initials of _port
    > outbound, starboard home_ ..." I for one am confident in the
    > Oxford's expertise and research.


    I find it instructive that the Oxford does not include a certain sound
    made by big cats under the definition of "chuffing", even though there
    is much literature concerning such cats that contains that usage
    (google "feline hyoid bone" and I believe that you'll find a good
    sampling). While they try hard that doesn't mean that they're
    infallible.

    However the full Oxford most assuredly _does_ include obsolete and
    archaic usages and if they specifically mention that there is no
    support for a particular definition that means that they did
    investigate.

    > Now, do you have anything to say about photography?


    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Dec 19, 2008
    #11
  12. ray

    J. Clarke Guest

    DRS wrote:
    > "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9B7945CBA397FReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30
    >> DRS added these comments in the current discussion du jour ...
    >>> "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:Xns9B79428084CB6ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30

    >
    > [...]
    >
    >>>> This was meant to be a joke on why I don't think that "alt"
    >>>> is an acronym, but POSH does mean that, it is just debatable
    >>>> what the words were meant to convey. The reason the
    >>>> dictionary doesn't define "port outbound, starboard inbound"
    >>>> is that it doesn't include obsolete definitions for terms and
    >>>> acronyms, only words generally considered to be current.
    >>>> There are literally tens of thousands of legitimate words in
    >>>> the English language that won't be found in a standard
    >>>> dictionary no matter how think or how new, but they can be
    >>>> found with some judicious Googling.
    >>>
    >>> The word is current and in the dictionary. It is a matter of
    >>> etymology, not meaning (although the Oxford does provide many
    >>> archaic meanings). My New Oxford says "There is no evidence
    >>> to support the folk etymology that _posh_ is formed from the
    >>> initials of _port outbound, starboard home_ ..." I for one am
    >>> confident in the Oxford's expertise and research.

    >>
    >> I know the word is current, what I said what that tens of
    >> thousands of words are obsolete and have been dropped from the
    >> major dictionaries. What part of that don't you understand.

    >
    > That is not what you said. What you said is cited above. You said
    > the reason "port outbound, starboard inbound"


    Uh, if you're going to argue this then at least argue over the right
    acronym. "port outbound, starboard inbound" would be "POSI", not
    "POSH". Geez, some people . . .

    > is not in the Oxford is
    > because "it doesn't include obsolete definitions for terms and
    > acronyms". The problem for you is that not only does the Oxford
    > frequently give archaic meanings but it also always gives a word's
    > etymology. In this instance, the prevalence of the myth to which
    > you
    > subscribe is so pervasive the editors felt it necessary to
    > explicitly
    > refute it.


    Further, HEMI-powered doesn't seem to be familiar with the Oxford,
    which is not like "major dictionaries" such as the Merriam-Webster
    unabridged. Those dictionaries, as impressive as they are, one person
    can carry easily. The Oxford comes in 20 volumes and the only thing
    it has ever dropped is the shelf on which it was stored. There is a
    Compact Oxford that is physically about the same size as the more
    commonplace dictionaries, however if you open it up you'll find that
    each page contains micrographic images of 9 pages of the 20 volume set
    and must be read with a magnifier (normally included in the purchase
    price).
    >
    >> Since I'm not in the business of either reasoning with fools nor
    >> doing their research for them, if you want to believe just one
    >> source instead of doing some independent research on your own, I
    >> guess you will remain blissfully ignorant about POSH, and
    >> probably about many other things.

    >
    > No reputable sources support your claim. That I cited one cannot be
    > assumed to be exhaustive.
    >
    >>> Now, do you have anything to say about photography?
    >>>

    >> Yes. I have a nice picture of you that I found in another
    >> newsgroup of a geek with a propeller on top his beanie. Would
    >> that be you?

    >
    > Now you can look up "hoist on your own petard."


    Generally when a Chrysler product becomes recalcitrant the best
    solution is to trade it in. Pity we can't do that in this case.

    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Dec 19, 2008
    #12
  13. ray

    Eric Stevens Guest

    On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 05:32:17 -0600, "HEMI-Powered" <>
    wrote:

    >Eric Stevens added these comments in the current discussion du
    >jour ...
    >
    >>>>Actually, POSH was how to select the coolest side of the ship
    >>>>when travelling backwards and forwards between England and
    >>>>India.
    >>>
    >>>So many think, but it's not so -- see Wikipedia.

    >>
    >> Now you've made me go and look up the New Shorter Oxford
    >> English Dictionary (NSOED). It gives three main meanings (1)
    >> a small coin (2) Nonsense, Rubbish (3) Smart, stylish,
    >> luxurious etc. It goes on to say "There is no evidence to
    >> support ... 'Port Out, Starboard Home"
    >>

    >This was meant to be a joke on why I don't think that "alt" is an
    >acronym, but POSH does mean that, it is just debatable what the
    >words were meant to convey. The reason the dictionary doesn't
    >define "port outbound, starboard inbound" is that it doesn't
    >include obsolete definitions for terms and acronyms, only words
    >generally considered to be current.


    The NSOED is compiled on a historical basis and gives all the old and
    obsolete usages and when they were used.

    >There are literally tens of
    >thousands of legitimate words in the English language that won't be
    >found in a standard dictionary no matter how think or how new, but
    >they can be found with some judicious Googling.


    If you know of any like that you should let the editors of the Oxford
    Dictionary know. They try to include everything.



    Eric Stevens
    Eric Stevens, Dec 19, 2008
    #13
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