Re: I finally figures out what Nikon's new 1 cameras remind me of

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. Bowser <> writes:

    > That said, I like the 1 series cameras, but I wonder who will buy
    > them? If they're aimed at P&S users looking to step up, why would they
    > spend that much and NOT get an SLR? Maybe if the price was about 35%
    > lower it would make sense, but at these levels?


    Because they're afraid of DSLRs.

    Because they don't want the size/weight of DSLRs.

    Because they see value in the high frame rates and "best shot" mode.

    Because they value the quiet operation.

    I'm probably missing some, too; but there's quite a set of valid
    reasons. If it weren't so new (i.e. if my information on it included a
    lot more from people actually using it) it might well be what I
    recommended instead to the last person I recommended buy a DSLR (he was
    annoyed beyond bounds by the slow response of his P&S trying to get
    pictures of his children, a not-uncommon interest of non-enthusiast
    photographers).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 27, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/28/2011 6:52 AM, Bowser wrote:
    > On 9/27/2011 1:53 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> Bowser<> writes:
    >>
    >>> That said, I like the 1 series cameras, but I wonder who will buy
    >>> them? If they're aimed at P&S users looking to step up, why would they
    >>> spend that much and NOT get an SLR? Maybe if the price was about 35%
    >>> lower it would make sense, but at these levels?

    >>
    >> Because they're afraid of DSLRs.
    >>
    >> Because they don't want the size/weight of DSLRs.
    >>
    >> Because they see value in the high frame rates and "best shot" mode.
    >>
    >> Because they value the quiet operation.
    >>
    >> I'm probably missing some, too; but there's quite a set of valid
    >> reasons. If it weren't so new (i.e. if my information on it included a
    >> lot more from people actually using it) it might well be what I
    >> recommended instead to the last person I recommended buy a DSLR (he was
    >> annoyed beyond bounds by the slow response of his P&S trying to get
    >> pictures of his children, a not-uncommon interest of non-enthusiast
    >> photographers).

    >
    > I guess we'll see how it sells, but Nikon sure priced it high for a P&S
    > step up cam.


    The market will determine the street price.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 28, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. David Dyer-Bennet

    Bruce Guest

    David Dyer-Bennet <> wrote:
    >
    >I'm probably missing some, too; but there's quite a set of valid
    >reasons. If it weren't so new (i.e. if my information on it included a
    >lot more from people actually using it) it might well be what I
    >recommended instead to the last person I recommended buy a DSLR (he was
    >annoyed beyond bounds by the slow response of his P&S trying to get
    >pictures of his children, a not-uncommon interest of non-enthusiast
    >photographers).



    We run occasional tutorials for P&S buyers - usually with the help of
    one of the main brands' importers, who chalk it up to their marketing
    budget.

    We teach users to prefocus with a half press of the shutter release,
    wait for the subject to reach the prefocused distance and shoot. The
    success rate is surprisingly high. It also makes people think about
    what they are shooting, rather than just snap away at random, so the
    images are often very good. Small focusing errors don't matter
    because of the huge depth of field offered by the small sensor.

    A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.

    Of course they can always buy a high-end pro DSLR which has the
    performance needed. But a simply learnt technique means that you can
    do it all with a much cheaper P&S.
     
    Bruce, Sep 28, 2011
    #3
  4. David Dyer-Bennet

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Bruce
    <> wrote:

    > We teach users to prefocus with a half press of the shutter release,
    > wait for the subject to reach the prefocused distance and shoot. The
    > success rate is surprisingly high. It also makes people think about
    > what they are shooting, rather than just snap away at random, so the
    > images are often very good. Small focusing errors don't matter
    > because of the huge depth of field offered by the small sensor.


    that helps with shutter lag on compacts.

    > A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    > sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    > greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    > modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    > is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.


    teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.
     
    nospam, Sep 28, 2011
    #4
  5. David Dyer-Bennet

    Bruce Guest

    nospam <> wrote:

    >In article <>, Bruce
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> We teach users to prefocus with a half press of the shutter release,
    >> wait for the subject to reach the prefocused distance and shoot. The
    >> success rate is surprisingly high. It also makes people think about
    >> what they are shooting, rather than just snap away at random, so the
    >> images are often very good. Small focusing errors don't matter
    >> because of the huge depth of field offered by the small sensor.

    >
    >that helps with shutter lag on compacts.



    Absolutely. It's amazing just how fast a p+s can be if you use the
    half press.


    >> A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    >> sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    >> greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    >> modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    >> is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.

    >
    >teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.



    At the same time as teaching them to use a fast shutter speed to
    freeze motion? If they then crank up the ISO, they will complain
    about noisy images. ;-)
     
    Bruce, Sep 28, 2011
    #5
  6. David Dyer-Bennet

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Bruce
    <> wrote:

    > >> A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    > >> sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    > >> greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    > >> modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    > >> is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.

    > >
    > >teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.

    >
    > At the same time as teaching them to use a fast shutter speed to
    > freeze motion? If they then crank up the ISO, they will complain
    > about noisy images. ;-)


    it'll match the p&s compact. there is no difference in depth of field
    for the same image quality.
     
    nospam, Sep 28, 2011
    #6
  7. David Dyer-Bennet

    Bruce Guest

    nospam <> wrote:

    >In article <>, Bruce
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> >> A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    >> >> sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    >> >> greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    >> >> modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    >> >> is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.
    >> >
    >> >teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.

    >>
    >> At the same time as teaching them to use a fast shutter speed to
    >> freeze motion? If they then crank up the ISO, they will complain
    >> about noisy images. ;-)

    >
    >it'll match the p&s compact. there is no difference in depth of field
    >for the same image quality.



    True, but we aren't talking about the same people. One owns a p+s and
    not a DSLR, and the other bought a DSLR for reasons of better image
    quality and wouldn't be seen dead using a p+s. ;-)
     
    Bruce, Sep 28, 2011
    #7
  8. David Dyer-Bennet

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/28/2011 1:13 PM, Bruce wrote:
    > nospam<> wrote:
    >
    >> In article<>, Bruce
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    >>>>> sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    >>>>> greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    >>>>> modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    >>>>> is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.
    >>>>
    >>>> teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.
    >>>
    >>> At the same time as teaching them to use a fast shutter speed to
    >>> freeze motion? If they then crank up the ISO, they will complain
    >>> about noisy images. ;-)

    >>
    >> it'll match the p&s compact. there is no difference in depth of field
    >> for the same image quality.

    >
    >
    > True, but we aren't talking about the same people. One owns a p+s and
    > not a DSLR, and the other bought a DSLR for reasons of better image
    > quality and wouldn't be seen dead using a p+s. ;-)
    >
    >
    >

    What a snobby thing to say. Many excellent amateur and Professional
    photographers who use DSLRs, will also use a P&S when they prefer not to
    carry a heavier camera.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 28, 2011
    #8
  9. David Dyer-Bennet

    Trevor Guest

    "Bruce" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > We teach users to prefocus with a half press of the shutter release,
    > wait for the subject to reach the prefocused distance and shoot. The
    > success rate is surprisingly high. It also makes people think about
    > what they are shooting, rather than just snap away at random, so the
    > images are often very good. Small focusing errors don't matter
    > because of the huge depth of field offered by the small sensor.
    >
    > A problem with using a DSLR to shoot children is that the larger
    > sensor means much more limited depth of field. This places a much
    > greater demand on the AF system. Unfortunately, the continuous AF
    > modes of entry-level DSLRs can leave a lot to be desired. The result
    > is that sharply focused images can be an elusive goal for DSLR users.


    Why do you think the same "half press prefocus" does not work for DSLR
    users? And why they can't use smaller apertures if they want more latitude
    to focusing error?
    The ability of most DSLR's to produce far better pictures at far higher ISO
    means you can easily use smaller apertures if you want the same depth of
    field as those POS cameras.
    Not having the ability to throw backgrounds out of focus is often what makes
    those toy camera portraits less than satisfying though.

    Trevor.
     
    Trevor, Sep 29, 2011
    #9
  10. David Dyer-Bennet

    Trevor Guest

    "Bruce" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >>teach them to use a smaller f/stop for deeper depth of field.

    >
    >
    > At the same time as teaching them to use a fast shutter speed to
    > freeze motion? If they then crank up the ISO, they will complain
    > about noisy images. ;-)


    Not when they compare a good DSLR pic to the POS pics. The ISO could be at
    least 4 stops higher for similar noise levels in most cases, often far more
    than that!

    Trevor.
     
    Trevor, Sep 29, 2011
    #10
  11. David Dyer-Bennet

    Trevor Guest

    "Bruce" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > True, but we aren't talking about the same people. One owns a p+s and
    > not a DSLR, and the other bought a DSLR for reasons of better image
    > quality and wouldn't be seen dead using a p+s. ;-)


    No you were talking about what you teach at your tutorials!
    Teaching should involve telling them what their options are, not what your
    biases are.

    Trevor.
     
    Trevor, Sep 29, 2011
    #11
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Neil Simpson

    Certification figures out of date

    Neil Simpson, Dec 8, 2004, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    453
  2. John
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    471
    lee h
    Nov 19, 2007
  3. nobody760

    What does this remind me of?

    nobody760, Sep 19, 2003, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    301
    gromit
    Sep 19, 2003
  4. RichA
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    331
    Peter
    Sep 8, 2010
  5. Robert Coe
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    265
    John Turco
    Oct 27, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page