Re: How to get best close up for dermatologist

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    <> wrote:

    >While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >
    >The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >
    >Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >
    >Thanks


    Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.

    You could write on the band-aid in magic marker "For focus purpose
    only" so the doc will know why it's there.

    Also, for this purpose, your white balance should be set for the image
    if your camera has this capability. Flash should be off. Shoot in
    daylight, but not direct sun, if you can.

    As to distance of camera-to-skin, too close and the camera won't
    focus. Move back until it does and stop there. The camera should beep
    or a green light will illuminate when you are focus. (I don't know
    how that model works)




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Feb 29, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:06:31 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:21:48 -0500, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >>>said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >>>took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >>>Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >>>
    >>>The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >>>focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >>>get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >>>
    >>>Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >>>photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks

    >>
    >>Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    >>something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    >>around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    >>skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    >>band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.
    >>
    >>You could write on the band-aid in magic marker "For focus purpose
    >>only" so the doc will know why it's there.

    >
    >How does the camera focus? I thought it used IR or something.
    >
    >Will anything that has a sharp outline work, like a coin?


    A coin, or anything that presents a clear delineation, would work. I
    suggested a band-aid because it is flat and barely higher than the
    skin so there will not be a depth-of-field problem.

    >>Also, for this purpose, your white balance should be set for the image
    >>if your camera has this capability.

    >
    >The camera has a bunch of settings, but I don't know how to use them.
    >I'll check the user's manual.


    In that case, just shoot Auto in daylight but not in bright sunlight.
    Your skin will reflect bright sunlight and appear washed out. Sitting
    inside next to a window on a sunny day will work. The auto white
    balance should be close enough.

    >>Flash should be off. Shoot in
    >>daylight, but not direct sun, if you can.

    >
    >Yeah, I learned that the hard way.
    >
    >>As to distance of camera-to-skin, too close and the camera won't
    >>focus. Move back until it does and stop there. The camera should beep
    >>or a green light will illuminate when you are focus. (I don't know
    >>how that model works)

    >
    >OK, I'll see what I can do. Thanks.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Feb 29, 2012
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Jennifer
    Murphy <> wrote:

    > How does the camera focus? I thought it used IR or something.


    it needs an edge and measures the highest contrast, which will occur
    when it's in focus.

    > Will anything that has a sharp outline work, like a coin?


    sure. put a coin on your skin and focus on that, which will also help
    as a size reference to what's on your skin.
    nospam, Feb 29, 2012
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >How does the camera focus? I thought it used IR or something.
    > >
    > >Will anything that has a sharp outline work, like a coin?

    >
    > A coin, or anything that presents a clear delineation, would work. I
    > suggested a band-aid because it is flat and barely higher than the
    > skin so there will not be a depth-of-field problem.


    a bandage is also not much of an edge and it's close to the skin colour
    so it won't be a good focus target. a coin is a much better choice, and
    p&s cameras have more than enough depth of field to include the
    thickness of a coin.

    > >>Also, for this purpose, your white balance should be set for the image
    > >>if your camera has this capability.

    > >
    > >The camera has a bunch of settings, but I don't know how to use them.
    > >I'll check the user's manual.

    >
    > In that case, just shoot Auto in daylight but not in bright sunlight.
    > Your skin will reflect bright sunlight and appear washed out. Sitting
    > inside next to a window on a sunny day will work. The auto white
    > balance should be close enough.


    it's unlikely it will be washed out if the camera's exposure meter
    works (which it no doubt does), but in the unlikely event it is, try
    again in different light.
    nospam, Feb 29, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Pablo Guest

    tony cooper escribió:

    > On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >>said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >>took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >>Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >>
    >>The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >>focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >>get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >>
    >>Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >>photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >>
    >>Thanks

    >
    > Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    > something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    > around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    > skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    > band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.


    This assumes that said rash is on an arm or something. If it's on the foot
    or another "lumpy" bit, or even a hairy part, then this approach will not
    work.

    --
    Pablo

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wibbleypants/
    http://paulc.es/piso/index.php
    Pablo, Feb 29, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 10:51:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:

    >tony cooper escribió:
    >
    >> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >>>said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >>>took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >>>Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >>>
    >>>The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >>>focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >>>get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >>>
    >>>Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >>>photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks

    >>
    >> Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    >> something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    >> around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    >> skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    >> band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.

    >
    >This assumes that said rash is on an arm or something. If it's on the foot
    >or another "lumpy" bit, or even a hairy part, then this approach will not
    >work.


    I don't understand why not. The idea of a band-aid - with text with a
    black magic marker - was offered because the band-aid would not slip
    or move where a coin might slide off. No "flesh-covered" band-aid
    blends so well with the skin that the edge wouldn't act as a focus
    point, but the magic marker text would absolutely be a focus point.

    The OP has already stated that she has attempted and failed to get a
    good photo, so we can safely assume that the body part involved is
    accessible for a self-portrait.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Feb 29, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:31:07 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    : On 2012-02-29 06:27:51 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    :
    : > On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 10:51:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:
    : >
    : >> tony cooper escribió:
    : >>
    : >>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    : >>> <> wrote:
    : >>>
    : >>>> While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    : >>>> said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    : >>>> took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    : >>>> Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    : >>>> focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    : >>>> get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    : >>>> photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    : >>>>
    : >>>> Thanks
    : >>>
    : >>> Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    : >>> something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    : >>> around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    : >>> skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    : >>> band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.
    : >>
    : >> This assumes that said rash is on an arm or something. If it's on the foot
    : >> or another "lumpy" bit, or even a hairy part, then this approach will not
    : >> work.
    : >
    : > I don't understand why not. The idea of a band-aid - with text with a
    : > black magic marker - was offered because the band-aid would not slip
    : > or move where a coin might slide off. No "flesh-covered" band-aid
    : > blends so well with the skin that the edge wouldn't act as a focus
    : > point, but the magic marker text would absolutely be a focus point.
    : >
    : > The OP has already stated that she has attempted and failed to get a
    : > good photo, so we can safely assume that the body part involved is
    : > accessible for a self-portrait.
    :
    : If it is an arm,or hand a watch on the wrist or a ring should do. For
    : the face slip on some glasses, or shades if you have them.
    : Don't use macro unless you are trying to capture a specific lesion. If
    : so have somebody else take the shot for you. Actually have somebody
    : else take the shot for you anyway.

    Am I the only one reading this thread who wonders where in the world they have
    Internet access but no dermatologists? If I were the OP's dermatologist, I
    think I would have told her to have a local dermatologist look at it and then
    call me with his tentative diagnosis. If he (the local physician) thinks a
    picture would help, he's probably in a better position to know how to take it.
    He may also know what's going around in the area (Lyne disease or whatever).

    Year, I know: we're photographers, so we look for photographic solutions to
    problems. If the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Mar 1, 2012
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 05:36:55 -0500, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:31:07 -0800, Savageduck
    ><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >: On 2012-02-29 06:27:51 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >:
    >: > On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 10:51:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:
    >: >
    >: >> tony cooper escribió:
    >: >>
    >: >>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    >: >>> <> wrote:
    >: >>>
    >: >>>> While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >: >>>> said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >: >>>> took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >: >>>> Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >: >>>>
    >: >>>> The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >: >>>> focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >: >>>> get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >: >>>>
    >: >>>> Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >: >>>> photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >: >>>>
    >: >>>> Thanks
    >: >>>
    >: >>> Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    >: >>> something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    >: >>> around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    >: >>> skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    >: >>> band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.
    >: >>
    >: >> This assumes that said rash is on an arm or something. If it's on the foot
    >: >> or another "lumpy" bit, or even a hairy part, then this approach will not
    >: >> work.
    >: >
    >: > I don't understand why not. The idea of a band-aid - with text with a
    >: > black magic marker - was offered because the band-aid would not slip
    >: > or move where a coin might slide off. No "flesh-covered" band-aid
    >: > blends so well with the skin that the edge wouldn't act as a focus
    >: > point, but the magic marker text would absolutely be a focus point.
    >: >
    >: > The OP has already stated that she has attempted and failed to get a
    >: > good photo, so we can safely assume that the body part involved is
    >: > accessible for a self-portrait.
    >:
    >: If it is an arm,or hand a watch on the wrist or a ring should do. For
    >: the face slip on some glasses, or shades if you have them.
    >: Don't use macro unless you are trying to capture a specific lesion. If
    >: so have somebody else take the shot for you. Actually have somebody
    >: else take the shot for you anyway.
    >
    >Am I the only one reading this thread who wonders where in the world they have
    >Internet access but no dermatologists? If I were the OP's dermatologist, I
    >think I would have told her to have a local dermatologist look at it and then
    >call me with his tentative diagnosis. If he (the local physician) thinks a
    >picture would help, he's probably in a better position to know how to take it.
    >He may also know what's going around in the area (Lyne disease or whatever).
    >
    >Year, I know: we're photographers, so we look for photographic solutions to
    >problems. If the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
    >


    If you want to look at that side of it, I wonder how she got her
    dermatologist on the phone in the first place. A doctor who takes a
    phone call from a patient?

    Unless the patient is the doctor's wife, husband, mother, or father,
    the standard office practice is to fob off all calls to someone who
    can offer no more assistance than to tell the patient to schedule an
    appointment with the doctor.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 1, 2012
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 06:34:35 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2012-03-01 05:58:26 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 05:36:55 -0500, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:31:07 -0800, Savageduck
    >>> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>> : On 2012-02-29 06:27:51 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >>> :
    >>> : > On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 10:51:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:
    >>> : >
    >>> : >> tony cooper escribió:
    >>> : >>
    >>> : >>> On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 15:50:39 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
    >>> : >>> <> wrote:
    >>> : >>>
    >>> : >>>> While on a trip, I developed some sort of skin rash. My dermatologist
    >>> : >>>> said it didn't sound serious, but asked me to send him a few photos. I
    >>> : >>>> took some using the Macro setting on my new Nikon Coolpix S8200 in Auto
    >>> : >>>> Mode with an Image Mode setting of 12M.
    >>> : >>>>
    >>> : >>>> The dermatologist said to take more from further away and with better
    >>> : >>>> focus. I've tried several settings and different distances, but can't
    >>> : >>>> get a really clear shot. I am using a little portable tripod, too.
    >>> : >>>>
    >>> : >>>> Can someone tell me what settings to use and how to take a good close-up
    >>> : >>>> photo of this rash for medical diagnosis?
    >>> : >>>>
    >>> : >>>> Thanks
    >>> : >>>
    >>> : >>> Your camera's auto focus is probably having a problem finding
    >>> : >>> something to focus on. The difference between your rash and the skin
    >>> : >>> around it isn't enough to allow focus. Put a small band-aid on the
    >>> : >>> skin and allow the camera's focus point to be half on the edge of the
    >>> : >>> band-aid and half off. This will give the camera a focus point.
    >>> : >>
    >>> : >> This assumes that said rash is on an arm or something. If it's on the foot
    >>> : >> or another "lumpy" bit, or even a hairy part, then this approach will not
    >>> : >> work.
    >>> : >
    >>> : > I don't understand why not. The idea of a band-aid - with text with a
    >>> : > black magic marker - was offered because the band-aid would not slip
    >>> : > or move where a coin might slide off. No "flesh-covered" band-aid
    >>> : > blends so well with the skin that the edge wouldn't act as a focus
    >>> : > point, but the magic marker text would absolutely be a focus point.
    >>> : >
    >>> : > The OP has already stated that she has attempted and failed to get a
    >>> : > good photo, so we can safely assume that the body part involved is
    >>> : > accessible for a self-portrait.
    >>> :
    >>> : If it is an arm,or hand a watch on the wrist or a ring should do. For
    >>> : the face slip on some glasses, or shades if you have them.
    >>> : Don't use macro unless you are trying to capture a specific lesion. If
    >>> : so have somebody else take the shot for you. Actually have somebody
    >>> : else take the shot for you anyway.
    >>>
    >>> Am I the only one reading this thread who wonders where in the world they have
    >>> Internet access but no dermatologists? If I were the OP's dermatologist, I
    >>> think I would have told her to have a local dermatologist look at it and then
    >>> call me with his tentative diagnosis. If he (the local physician) thinks a
    >>> picture would help, he's probably in a better position to know how to take it.
    >>> He may also know what's going around in the area (Lyne disease or whatever).
    >>>
    >>> Year, I know: we're photographers, so we look for photographic solutions to
    >>> problems. If the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
    >>>

    >>
    >> If you want to look at that side of it, I wonder how she got her
    >> dermatologist on the phone in the first place. A doctor who takes a
    >> phone call from a patient?
    >>
    >> Unless the patient is the doctor's wife, husband, mother, or father,
    >> the standard office practice is to fob off all calls to someone who
    >> can offer no more assistance than to tell the patient to schedule an
    >> appointment with the doctor.

    >
    >I tend to agree. It is one thing for us to address a photographic
    >problem or issue, but the main consideration in this case should be to
    >get the dermatological issue dealt with.


    Yeah, but props to the group for actually including something related
    to photography in posts. That's not always done. <<<<(points finger
    at self)

    I'll contribute on the photographic side, but I wouldn't want to have
    a doctor who was willing to make a diagnosis based on a photograph.
    His malpractice insurance carrier probably wouldn't either.

    I wonder if color-calibration is required for doctors who diagnose
    skin rashes by photo.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 1, 2012
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Robert Coe
    <> wrote:

    > Am I the only one reading this thread who wonders where in the world they have
    > Internet access but no dermatologists? If I were the OP's dermatologist, I
    > think I would have told her to have a local dermatologist look at it and then
    > call me with his tentative diagnosis. If he (the local physician) thinks a
    > picture would help, he's probably in a better position to know how to take it.
    > He may also know what's going around in the area (Lyne disease or whatever).


    no, you aren't the only one, but it's not impossible that he might want
    photos. the proper way to get it diagnosed is to see someone locally,
    however, her dermatologist knows her history and might be able to tell
    if it's related to an existing condition and if it warrants seeing
    someone locally or if she can wait until she gets home.
    nospam, Mar 1, 2012
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > If you want to look at that side of it, I wonder how she got her
    > dermatologist on the phone in the first place. A doctor who takes a
    > phone call from a patient?


    what's so surprising about that?

    > Unless the patient is the doctor's wife, husband, mother, or father,
    > the standard office practice is to fob off all calls to someone who
    > can offer no more assistance than to tell the patient to schedule an
    > appointment with the doctor.


    nonsense. the office staff will take a message and the doctor will call
    you back a short time later.
    nospam, Mar 1, 2012
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 08:49:56 -0800, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> If you want to look at that side of it, I wonder how she got her
    >> dermatologist on the phone in the first place. A doctor who takes a
    >> phone call from a patient?

    >
    >what's so surprising about that?
    >
    >> Unless the patient is the doctor's wife, husband, mother, or father,
    >> the standard office practice is to fob off all calls to someone who
    >> can offer no more assistance than to tell the patient to schedule an
    >> appointment with the doctor.

    >
    >nonsense. the office staff will take a message and the doctor will call
    >you back a short time later.


    Ahh, yes. Here's nospam to contradict. He will soon tell me that
    he's called many doctors and had them come to the phone immediately or
    call him back forthwith. Just as he has ordered many products from
    China and had them on his doorstep almost instantly, taken many plane
    rides and done his visual market share surveys, and spent the morning
    cashing checks in his kitchen.

    He lives in his own little world of fantasy.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 1, 2012
    #12
  13. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> If you want to look at that side of it, I wonder how she got her
    > >> dermatologist on the phone in the first place. A doctor who takes a
    > >> phone call from a patient?

    > >
    > >what's so surprising about that?
    > >
    > >> Unless the patient is the doctor's wife, husband, mother, or father,
    > >> the standard office practice is to fob off all calls to someone who
    > >> can offer no more assistance than to tell the patient to schedule an
    > >> appointment with the doctor.

    > >
    > >nonsense. the office staff will take a message and the doctor will call
    > >you back a short time later.

    >
    > Ahh, yes. Here's nospam to contradict.


    when you are wrong, i will contradict.

    > He will soon tell me that
    > he's called many doctors and had them come to the phone immediately or
    > call him back forthwith. Just as he has ordered many products from
    > China and had them on his doorstep almost instantly,


    i never said immediately or instantly. stop lying.

    > taken many plane
    > rides and done his visual market share surveys, and spent the morning
    > cashing checks in his kitchen.


    the kitchen isn't the best place. the lighting is better elsewhere.

    > He lives in his own little world of fantasy.


    quite the opposite. you're just jealous i get to do things you can't.
    nospam, Mar 1, 2012
    #13
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