Re: How many questions are on a typical A+ exam?

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by plazticsoul, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. plazticsoul

    plazticsoul Guest

    "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message news:...
    > A word of advice: You can trust Mike Meyer's all-one-one guide (along with
    > sample tests found online) as your only source for passing.


    I meant this for A+ Certification
     
    plazticsoul, Feb 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. plazticsoul

    plazticsoul Guest

    No prob. The "All-in-One" exam guide was probably the most enjoyable PC book
    I've ever read, despite its length. He doesn't just explain how things are,
    he tries to tell you WHY they are that way, which I thought was crucial to
    understanding. Read it as you would a novel, straight through, even though
    it covers both exams. Grasp the concepts and save the memorization for last.
    Just highlight things you find important along the way. Then, take what you
    know will be on which test, go back and focus only on whichever exam you'll
    be tackling first.

    Meyers is the king of A+.

    Just remember when you get to Network+ go with both Meyers AND Exam Cram 2.
    At least that's what did it for me before the exam was updated last year.



    "Edward A. Weissbard" <> wrote in message
    news:a_NHf.20233$...
    > Plazticsoul,
    >
    > Thanks for the guidance, good to know!
    >
    > --
    > Edward A. Weissbard
    > El Paso, TX
    >
    > "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    > -----------------------------------------------
    > "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    > news:fgKHf.379989$0l5.21646@dukeread06...
    > >
    > > "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message news:...
    > > > A word of advice: You can trust Mike Meyer's all-one-one guide (along

    > with
    > > > sample tests found online) as your only source for passing.

    > >
    > > I meant this for A+ Certification
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    plazticsoul, Feb 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. plazticsoul

    plazticsoul Guest

    You could, but it's not necessary. While certainly A+/Net+/Sec+ provide the
    foundations, many companies would like to see specialized certifications.
    Think of these three as the high school diplomas of their respected fields.

    I passed A+ and Network+ and for some odd reason decided to go after a
    Novell certificate. I think it's because my office uses Netware. But Novell
    seems to be dying a slow death so I abandoned my self-training for that and
    dove straight into Microsoft's 70-290 exam (Windows Server 2003
    Environment). I'm taking this test March 3rd. Network+ was very helpful
    laying down the groundwork, as well as the A+'s O.S. portion of study. I'm
    sure Security+ would have helped greatly too, because I think it's safe to
    say that security is top-priority in server/client environments!!!

    > After A+, would Network+, then Security+ be the next logical step
    > before going for the MCSE, MCSA or CCNA certs?
    >
     
    plazticsoul, Feb 13, 2006
    #3
  4. plazticsoul

    WW Guest

    I agree with your comments on Meyers All-in-One A+ book - it is a very
    useful book for A+. I also agree that reading BOTH Meyers book and the Exam
    Cram 2 book is not a bad idea, particularly for N+, so as to get maximum
    coverage. I also used the Exam Cram 2 Practice Questions book. Other good
    practice test sources are CoreExams.com (budget) and TestKing.com.

    I always recommend Scott Muellers book on Upgrading and Repairing PC's (16th
    Ed), as it contains the real nitty-gritty details which are useful for any
    "tech" to refer to whilst working or studying. It is also surprisingly
    readable considering the density of subject matter.


    "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    news:HbSHf.29839$Dh.13867@dukeread04...
    > No prob. The "All-in-One" exam guide was probably the most enjoyable PC
    > book
    > I've ever read, despite its length. He doesn't just explain how things
    > are,
    > he tries to tell you WHY they are that way, which I thought was crucial to
    > understanding. Read it as you would a novel, straight through, even though
    > it covers both exams. Grasp the concepts and save the memorization for
    > last.
    > Just highlight things you find important along the way. Then, take what
    > you
    > know will be on which test, go back and focus only on whichever exam
    > you'll
    > be tackling first.
    >
    > Meyers is the king of A+.
    >
    > Just remember when you get to Network+ go with both Meyers AND Exam Cram
    > 2.
    > At least that's what did it for me before the exam was updated last year.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Edward A. Weissbard" <> wrote in message
    > news:a_NHf.20233$...
    >> Plazticsoul,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the guidance, good to know!
    >>
    >> --
    >> Edward A. Weissbard
    >> El Paso, TX
    >>
    >> "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    >> -----------------------------------------------
    >> "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    >> news:fgKHf.379989$0l5.21646@dukeread06...
    >> >
    >> > "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message news:...
    >> > > A word of advice: You can trust Mike Meyer's all-one-one guide (along

    >> with
    >> > > sample tests found online) as your only source for passing.
    >> >
    >> > I meant this for A+ Certification
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    WW, Feb 13, 2006
    #4
  5. plazticsoul

    J. Clarke Guest

    WW wrote:

    > I agree with your comments on Meyers All-in-One A+ book - it is a very
    > useful book for A+. I also agree that reading BOTH Meyers book and the
    > Exam Cram 2 book is not a bad idea, particularly for N+, so as to get
    > maximum coverage. I also used the Exam Cram 2 Practice Questions book.
    > Other good practice test sources are CoreExams.com (budget) and
    > TestKing.com.


    For N+ the ExamCram 2 may be useful, for A+ it's so full of stuff that is
    just plain _wrong_ that IMO it's worse than a waste of time.

    > I always recommend Scott Muellers book on Upgrading and Repairing PC's
    > (16th Ed), as it contains the real nitty-gritty details which are useful
    > for any "tech" to refer to whilst working or studying. It is also
    > surprisingly readable considering the density of subject matter.
    >
    >
    > "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    > news:HbSHf.29839$Dh.13867@dukeread04...
    >> No prob. The "All-in-One" exam guide was probably the most enjoyable PC
    >> book
    >> I've ever read, despite its length. He doesn't just explain how things
    >> are,
    >> he tries to tell you WHY they are that way, which I thought was crucial
    >> to understanding. Read it as you would a novel, straight through, even
    >> though it covers both exams. Grasp the concepts and save the memorization
    >> for last.
    >> Just highlight things you find important along the way. Then, take what
    >> you
    >> know will be on which test, go back and focus only on whichever exam
    >> you'll
    >> be tackling first.
    >>
    >> Meyers is the king of A+.
    >>
    >> Just remember when you get to Network+ go with both Meyers AND Exam Cram
    >> 2.
    >> At least that's what did it for me before the exam was updated last year.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Edward A. Weissbard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:a_NHf.20233$...
    >>> Plazticsoul,
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the guidance, good to know!
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Edward A. Weissbard
    >>> El Paso, TX
    >>>
    >>> "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    >>> -----------------------------------------------
    >>> "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:fgKHf.379989$0l5.21646@dukeread06...
    >>> >
    >>> > "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message news:...
    >>> > > A word of advice: You can trust Mike Meyer's all-one-one guide
    >>> > > (along
    >>> with
    >>> > > sample tests found online) as your only source for passing.
    >>> >
    >>> > I meant this for A+ Certification
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Feb 13, 2006
    #5
  6. plazticsoul

    WW Guest

    I agree, it caused me a bit of trouble also. I just had to sift through the
    useful info I could get out of it, and crosscheck other sources. Meyers has
    errors in it too though.

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > WW wrote:
    >
    >> I agree with your comments on Meyers All-in-One A+ book - it is a very
    >> useful book for A+. I also agree that reading BOTH Meyers book and the
    >> Exam Cram 2 book is not a bad idea, particularly for N+, so as to get
    >> maximum coverage. I also used the Exam Cram 2 Practice Questions book.
    >> Other good practice test sources are CoreExams.com (budget) and
    >> TestKing.com.

    >
    > For N+ the ExamCram 2 may be useful, for A+ it's so full of stuff that is
    > just plain _wrong_ that IMO it's worse than a waste of time.
    >
     
    WW, Feb 15, 2006
    #6
  7. plazticsoul

    J. Clarke Guest

    WW wrote:

    > I agree, it caused me a bit of trouble also. I just had to sift through
    > the useful info I could get out of it, and crosscheck other sources.
    > Meyers has errors in it too though.


    I read about three chapters, tossed it in the trash, said "if this is exam
    prep who needs it?" and went and took the exam.

    > "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> WW wrote:
    >>
    >>> I agree with your comments on Meyers All-in-One A+ book - it is a very
    >>> useful book for A+. I also agree that reading BOTH Meyers book and the
    >>> Exam Cram 2 book is not a bad idea, particularly for N+, so as to get
    >>> maximum coverage. I also used the Exam Cram 2 Practice Questions book.
    >>> Other good practice test sources are CoreExams.com (budget) and
    >>> TestKing.com.

    >>
    >> For N+ the ExamCram 2 may be useful, for A+ it's so full of stuff that is
    >> just plain _wrong_ that IMO it's worse than a waste of time.
    >>


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Feb 15, 2006
    #7
  8. plazticsoul

    plazticsoul Guest

    "plazticsoul" <> wrote in message
    news:5HSHf.29841$Dh.10208@dukeread04...
    > You could, but it's not necessary. While certainly A+/Net+/Sec+ provide

    the
    > foundations, many companies would like to see specialized certifications.
    > Think of these three as the high school diplomas of their respected

    fields.

    Let me correct myself. The A+/Network+ does help you on the Microsoft track.
    For the MCSA you will need to pass 3 tests (recommended: 70-270, 70-290,
    70-291) PLUS one elective. The A+ or the Network+ can substitute the
    elective exam. If you are going after a MCSE, you will need to pass SEVEN
    exams, which includes one elective which A+/Network+ does NOT substitute. If
    you want to have the title of "MCSE: Security" there is an eighth exam
    (elective) and Security+ exam can substitute for that eighth exam.
     
    plazticsoul, Feb 16, 2006
    #8
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