Re: How do you remove a telephone socket?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by peterwn, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    On Dec 5, 10:22 pm, EMB <> wrote:
    > On 5/12/2010 9:00 p.m., wrote:
    >
    > > I have a  socket which is surplus to my needs. It is live but the
    > > signal through it is poor (I get much better download speeds when I
    > > use other sockets in the house), and it is an eyesore in the middle of
    > > a wall I am redecorating.

    >
    > > What is the best way for me to remove it. Can I just cut the cable
    > > going to it and blank off the ends with insulation tape?

    >
    > Not without potentially causing ADSL issues now or in the future.  Trace
    > the cable back to its source and disconnect it there.

    If your house has the old three wire system, then buy new two wire
    sockets to replace the old M and E sockets. If wiring is very old,
    replace it with cat 5 wiring if reasonably possible.
    Pity you cannot buy the wired in splitters the installers use. Best
    thing is to install the splitter as near 'demarcation' as possible and
    run fresh cat 5 cable from the splitter to a dedicated socket for your
    ADSL modem.
     
    peterwn, Dec 5, 2010
    #1
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  2. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    On Dec 6, 9:26 am, wrote:
    > On Mon, 06 Dec 2010 08:52:39 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    > >On 6/12/2010 8:28 a.m., peterwn wrote:
    > >> On Dec 5, 10:22 pm, EMB<>  wrote:
    > >>> On 5/12/2010 9:00 p.m., wrote:

    >
    > >>>> I have a  socket which is surplus to my needs. It is live but the
    > >>>> signal through it is poor (I get much better download speeds when I
    > >>>> use other sockets in the house), and it is an eyesore in the middle of
    > >>>> a wall I am redecorating.

    >
    > >>>> What is the best way for me to remove it. Can I just cut the cable
    > >>>> going to it and blank off the ends with insulation tape?

    >
    > >>> Not without potentially causing ADSL issues now or in the future.  Trace
    > >>> the cable back to its source and disconnect it there.
    > >> If your house has the old three wire system, then buy new two wire
    > >> sockets to replace the old M and E sockets. If wiring is very old,
    > >> replace it with cat 5 wiring if reasonably possible.
    > >> Pity you cannot buy the wired in splitters the installers use. Best
    > >> thing is to install the splitter as near 'demarcation' as possible and
    > >> run fresh cat 5 cable from the splitter to a dedicated socket for your
    > >> ADSL modem.

    >
    > >The wired in splitters are definitely available, without knowing where
    > >the OP is based the best source is likely to be Trademe.  For example:

    >
    > ><http://www.trademe.co.nz/Computers/Networking-modems/Other/auction-33....>

    >
    > It is in fact a 2 wire socket.
    >
    > I am grateful to you both for taking the time to discuss this but, as
    > I said, this socket is surplus to my needs and I only want to get rid
    > of it. I do not haver the expertise to rewire my telecom system.
    > Everything works fine without this socket.
    >
    > I cannot trace the cable back to its source because after going up
    > into the ceiling it disappears down into a wall again presumably to
    > reappear in the main box along with other connections there. I lack
    > the knowhow and tools to be able to differentiate which cable is
    > which.
    >
    > So, what the hell, I have have just cut the cable. Everything is still
    > working ok at the moment. What factors should I be looking out for
    > that  might change to cause this to give me problems with my ADSL in
    > the future?

    The best thing to do is to pull the cable out of the wall and leave it
    loose in the ceiling. Otherwise some poor technician in the future may
    spend ages looking for a non existent socket.
    What can change in the future is Telcom will install a cabinet farily
    close to where you live, you or someone will sign up for ADSL2 type
    speeds then your house wiring including the unused 'tail' may well
    become the speed 'bottleneck'. Solution would be to get a techie
    around for $150 or so to run fresh cable from 'demarcation (the white
    box which needs a 'funny' screwdriver to get the lid off) to a
    splitter ond install a fresh cable and socket to where you want the
    modem.
     
    peterwn, Dec 6, 2010
    #2
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  3. peterwn

    John Little Guest

    On Dec 6, 2:49 pm, peterwn <> wrote:
    > On 5/12/2010 9:00 p.m., wrote:
    >
    > I have a  socket which is surplus to my needs...
    > What is the best way for me to remove it. ...


    peterwn replied:

    > The best thing to do is to pull the cable out of the wall and leave it
    > loose in the ceiling...


    You mean with the socket put back on it, don't you?

    Regards, John
     
    John Little, Dec 6, 2010
    #3
  4. >Do I need to get
    >one of those tools to push the wire into the connector or is there
    >some other way to do it?


    I've used a pen knife to insert the wires back into the clips/sockets.
    Just watch that you don't short any two clips.

    >What happens in the socket box that makes doing it this way different
    >from just leaving the cable cut with the wires separated?


    I removed a telephone jack because it was subject to corrosion in the
    clip sockets. This jack caused serious degrade in my dial-up days.

    Separate the wires and insulate them, although removing the cable
    should reduce the load elsewhere.
     
    Lindsay.Rollo@paradisedotnetdotnz, Dec 6, 2010
    #4
  5. peterwn

    Richard Guest

    On 6/12/2010 9:00 p.m., Lindsay.Rollo@paradisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    >> Do I need to get
    >> one of those tools to push the wire into the connector or is there
    >> some other way to do it?

    >
    > I've used a pen knife to insert the wires back into the clips/sockets.
    > Just watch that you don't short any two clips.
    >
    >> What happens in the socket box that makes doing it this way different
    >>from just leaving the cable cut with the wires separated?

    >
    > I removed a telephone jack because it was subject to corrosion in the
    > clip sockets. This jack caused serious degrade in my dial-up days.
    >
    > Separate the wires and insulate them, although removing the cable
    > should reduce the load elsewhere.


    If you are kludging along with plug in filters then unused wire and
    sockets can have a massive impact on DSL speeds.
     
    Richard, Dec 6, 2010
    #5
  6. peterwn

    Me Guest

    On 7/12/2010 1:41 a.m., Richard wrote:
    > On 6/12/2010 9:00 p.m., Lindsay.Rollo@paradisedotnetdotnz wrote:
    >>> Do I need to get
    >>> one of those tools to push the wire into the connector or is there
    >>> some other way to do it?

    >>
    >> I've used a pen knife to insert the wires back into the clips/sockets.
    >> Just watch that you don't short any two clips.
    >>
    >>> What happens in the socket box that makes doing it this way different
    >>> from just leaving the cable cut with the wires separated?

    >>
    >> I removed a telephone jack because it was subject to corrosion in the
    >> clip sockets. This jack caused serious degrade in my dial-up days.
    >>
    >> Separate the wires and insulate them, although removing the cable
    >> should reduce the load elsewhere.

    >
    > If you are kludging along with plug in filters then unused wire and
    > sockets can have a massive impact on DSL speeds.

    Is this because of induction/impedance losses to the ADSL signal through
    cable "tails"?
    So, in my house there are telephone sockets in most rooms. Most are
    redundant - I suppose I really only need one, and that should probably
    be by the TV, where a Sky box may need to be plugged in, where I can
    place my wireless router fairly centrally in the house, and where I can
    place the cordless phone base station. I can easily intercept the main
    line coming in, disconnect (and remove) everything else.
    Or - can I put an ADSL splitter in on the main line, directly to a
    socket in the position as above, but then take the "phone" side of the
    splitter back in to the system, and just leave the phone (now "phone
    only") sockets where they are without impacting on ADSL to the dedicated
    socket?
     
    Me, Dec 6, 2010
    #6
  7. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    On Dec 6, 4:52 pm, John Little <> wrote:
    > On Dec 6, 2:49 pm, peterwn <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 5/12/2010 9:00 p.m., wrote:

    >
    > > I have a  socket which is surplus to my needs...
    > > What is the best way for me to remove it. ...

    >
    > peterwn replied:
    >
    > > The best thing to do is to pull the cable out of the wall and leave it
    > > loose in the ceiling...

    >
    > You mean with the socket put back on it, don't you?
    >

    Oops, I should have indicated that the 'tails' should be appropriately
    dealt with. Ideally 'cap' the 2 or 3 'used' tails with the press
    connectors that techies use (I think Dick Smith have them), or wrap
    each one with insulating tape, or terminate in a loose socket like you
    suggested.
     
    peterwn, Dec 6, 2010
    #7
  8. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    On Dec 7, 8:41 am, Me <> wrote:

    > Or - can I put an ADSL splitter in on the main line, directly to a
    > socket in the position as above, but then take the "phone" side of the
    > splitter back in to the system, and just leave the phone (now "phone
    > only") sockets where they are without impacting on ADSL to the dedicated
    > socket?

    Yes, this is actually the best way of doing it. A proper splitter with
    wire tails is the best. I have used an ordinary plug splitter in one
    instance using odds and ends as appropriate. In either case you need
    a bit of knowhow. If you do not have, then get a technician to do it.
     
    peterwn, Dec 6, 2010
    #8
  9. peterwn

    Richard Guest

    On 7/12/2010 8:41 a.m., Me wrote:

    > Is this because of induction/impedance losses to the ADSL signal through
    > cable "tails"?
    > So, in my house there are telephone sockets in most rooms. Most are
    > redundant - I suppose I really only need one, and that should probably
    > be by the TV, where a Sky box may need to be plugged in, where I can
    > place my wireless router fairly centrally in the house, and where I can
    > place the cordless phone base station. I can easily intercept the main
    > line coming in, disconnect (and remove) everything else.
    > Or - can I put an ADSL splitter in on the main line, directly to a
    > socket in the position as above, but then take the "phone" side of the
    > splitter back in to the system, and just leave the phone (now "phone
    > only") sockets where they are without impacting on ADSL to the dedicated
    > socket?



    Its because they act as an antenna, and if you have the old 3 wire
    stuff, the third wire is on another pair which isnt twisted with the 2
    carrying the line, so it acts as a real nice antenna with a capacitor in
    the master socket coupling it to one side of the line.

    Also, the plugin filters often only have a single inductive element in
    series with one of the legs, so have the same problem when you have a
    lot of cable on the output of them. I think the specs have tighter
    reqiurements now compared to the first lot that came out, but again they
    are worse at filtering both the load of any device, and any AM radio
    that the cables on the output pick up and want to couple back into the
    line. The line is balanced which is why it works, doing stuff to
    unbalance it makes it much more suseptable to RF interference coming in.
     
    Richard, Dec 7, 2010
    #9
  10. peterwn

    Me Guest

    On 7/12/2010 11:00 a.m., peterwn wrote:
    > On Dec 7, 8:41 am, Me<> wrote:
    >
    >> Or - can I put an ADSL splitter in on the main line, directly to a
    >> socket in the position as above, but then take the "phone" side of the
    >> splitter back in to the system, and just leave the phone (now "phone
    >> only") sockets where they are without impacting on ADSL to the dedicated
    >> socket?

    > Yes, this is actually the best way of doing it. A proper splitter with
    > wire tails is the best. I have used an ordinary plug splitter in one
    > instance using odds and ends as appropriate. In either case you need
    > a bit of knowhow. If you do not have, then get a technician to do it.



    Well that's another project on the to do list. Simple in my case, as
    the main cable runs right under where I'd put the modem/router, then to
    a junction box where it splits to the other phone sockets around the house.
     
    Me, Dec 7, 2010
    #10
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