Re: Hidden Shut down Feature XP & XP Pro.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by EMB, Oct 25, 2008.

  1. EMB

    EMB Guest

    OZZY Boy wrote:
    >
    >
    > I needed to shut down a computer that does not have a Monitor connected and when at the Log On
    > screen..
    >
    > Well here is a way Press the Home key, then do a Ctrl + Enter then selected with One push the
    > right Arrow key Once, then hit Enter the computer should shut down
    >
    > When using the Ctrl + Enter keys be very careful not to push the enter key twice as that will put
    > you into Stand By mode..
    >
    > This mode gives you the 3 shut down buttons Stand by, Turn Off and Restart that you can select
    > with the right arrow key..
    >
    >
    > When in Windows this can be done with Ctrl + Esc then the u key but this can be found on Google.
    >

    Why not just use the shutdown command from another computer with the /m
    switch?
    EMB, Oct 25, 2008
    #1
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  2. EMB

    EMB Guest

    OZZY Boy wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 23:24:10 +1300, EMB <> wrote:


    >> Why not just use the shutdown command from another computer with the /m
    >> switch?

    >
    > And how do these 2 computers talk to each other..?
    >
    > These are not part of a Network..
    >
    >

    All it takes is a $5 crossover able to sort that problem out.

    Anyway, it doesn't hurt XP to just kill its power - an orderly shutdown
    is a nicety not a necessity.
    EMB, Oct 25, 2008
    #2
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  3. EMB

    Richard Guest

    OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>> These are not part of a Network..
    >>>
    >>>

    >> All it takes is a $5 crossover able to sort that problem out.
    >>
    >> Anyway, it doesn't hurt XP to just kill its power - an orderly shutdown
    >> is a nicety not a necessity.

    >
    >
    >
    > Not in this case, it had killed the Boot sector in the past.
    >
    > I all was Pray when I have to hit the reset or power off, and that is why I never try to do it.,
    > plus that is why Checkdisk in run most of the time if you do it..
    >
    >
    > And does the PC have to be set up to use a Crossover Cable and What ports are you referring to..?


    So if its not on a network and has no monitor, what exactly was the
    computer doing when it was turned on?
    Richard, Oct 25, 2008
    #3
  4. EMB

    EMB Guest

    OZZY Boy wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 23:56:15 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    >
    >> OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 23:24:10 +1300, EMB <> wrote:
    >>>> Why not just use the shutdown command from another computer with the /m
    >>>> switch?
    >> >
    >>> And how do these 2 computers talk to each other..?
    >>>
    >>> These are not part of a Network..
    >>>
    >>>

    >> All it takes is a $5 crossover able to sort that problem out.
    >>
    >> Anyway, it doesn't hurt XP to just kill its power - an orderly shutdown
    >> is a nicety not a necessity.

    >
    >
    >
    > Not in this case, it had killed the Boot sector in the past.
    >
    > I all was Pray when I have to hit the reset or power off, and that is why I never try to do it.,
    > plus that is why Checkdisk in run most of the time if you do it..


    FFS - format the PC with NTFS (or convert the drive to NTFS) which
    pretty much makes chkdsk redundant. There's no point in not using NTFS
    with a Windows OS that supports it.
    >
    > And does the PC have to be set up to use a Crossover Cable and What ports are you referring to..?
    >

    If you can (ostensibly) rescue the HDD problem then I'm sure you can get
    a crossover cable working without needing any help. BTW, I didn't
    mention any ports.
    EMB, Oct 25, 2008
    #4
  5. EMB

    Lodi Guest

    >On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 17:43:27 +1300, Mark Robinson wrote:

    >> OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>> On 26 Oct 2008 11:20:05 +1300, Carnations <>

    >> wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 11:16:21 +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>>> What a utter Stupid STATEMENT T THIS COMPUTER HAD NO MONITOR, SO
    >>>> HOW DO I SET UP THE LAN OR WHAT EVER, IT SEEMS THAT MOST OF YOU JUST
    >>>> CAN'T READ..
    >>> So plug one in!!
    >>> Take a monitor that is presently plugged into some other computer, and
    >>> plug it into this one!
    >>> Duh!!

    >>
    >> How do I get this other monitor.

    >
    > You are looking at it.


    POTD :)

    Lodi
    Lodi, Oct 26, 2008
    #5
  6. EMB

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Lodi" typed:
    >> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 17:43:27 +1300, Mark Robinson wrote:

    >
    >>> OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>>> On 26 Oct 2008 11:20:05 +1300, Carnations
    >>>> <> wrote: On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 11:16:21
    >>>> +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>>>> What a utter Stupid STATEMENT T THIS COMPUTER HAD NO MONITOR, SO
    >>>>> HOW DO I SET UP THE LAN OR WHAT EVER, IT SEEMS THAT MOST OF YOU
    >>>>> JUST CAN'T READ..
    >>>> So plug one in!!
    >>>> Take a monitor that is presently plugged into some other computer,
    >>>> and plug it into this one!
    >>>> Duh!!
    >>>
    >>> How do I get this other monitor.

    >>
    >> You are looking at it.

    >
    > POTD :)


    LOL, agreed.
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
    ~misfit~, Oct 26, 2008
    #6
  7. EMB

    Richard Guest

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 19:24:03 +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >
    >> Think before you post, are there any one here that Really knows any
    >> thing about computers, I begin to Wonder.

    >
    > Well, you - O great "Mainframe Engineer" - certainly do not.
    >
    > I've only ever seen two types (three actually) of inputs for monitors -
    > VGA (including digital VGA) cables and RGB cables.
    >
    > Very few standard/low-end monitors have RGB inputs.
    >
    > All video cards in the last 12 years have used VGA cable connectors.
    >
    > What type of connector does the onboard video card on this PC have?
    >
    > And how did you set it up in the first place?
    >
    > If you answer those questions honestly, you'll then have your own answer.


    You have never seen a mac then with their plethora of different
    semi-propriatory cables, sure, they are a standard, just one that noone
    else uses..

    Then there is hdmi, display port, dvi with and without the analog pins
    in the plug that make them not fit. LFH59/DMS59 for dual screen output
    on older quadros and the 4 headded cards.

    And for all we know his computer that he is typing on is a laptop so no
    way to use the monitor on that.

    But really, I cant see how anyone would get themselves into this
    situation and have something useful happening on the computer. How would
    you start it doing things unless you had a monitor plugged in at the
    time, or he has given it away or something.
    Richard, Oct 26, 2008
    #7
  8. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > I've only ever seen two types (three actually) of inputs for monitors -
    > VGA (including digital VGA) cables and RGB cables.


    What's this "digital VGA", then?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 26, 2008
    #8
  9. EMB

    Craig Sutton Guest

    "Carnations" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 18:39:22 +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >
    >> On 26 Oct 2008 18:24:16 +1300, Carnations <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 17:27:43 +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 26 Oct 2008 11:20:05 +1300, Carnations <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 11:16:21 +1300, OZZY Boy wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> What a utter Stupid STATEMENT T THIS COMPUTER HAD NO MONITOR, SO
    >>>>>> HOW DO I SET UP THE LAN OR WHAT EVER, IT SEEMS THAT MOST OF YOU
    >>>>>> JUST CAN'T READ..
    >>>>>
    >>>>>So plug one in!!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Take a monitor that is presently plugged into some other computer, and
    >>>>>plug it into this one!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Duh!!
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I get this other monitor.
    >>>
    >>>Hello!!!!? Anybody home???

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Well ar you going to give me a LCD monitor or not. ?

    >
    > Nope.
    >
    > You can use the one that you're looking at right now!
    >


    He could of gone to Ewaste day and chosen from Hundreds of free ones..
    Craig Sutton, Oct 26, 2008
    #9
  10. EMB

    David Empson Guest

    Carnations <> wrote:

    > On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 20:18:55 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    > > In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    > >
    > >> I've only ever seen two types (three actually) of inputs for monitors -
    > >> VGA (including digital VGA) cables and RGB cables.

    > >
    > > What's this "digital VGA", then?

    >
    > It is standard analogue VGA, but with extra pins carrying digital signals
    > in addition to the analogue VGA stuff.
    >
    > A simple adapter is all that is required to plug in a regular VGA monitor
    > into the digital VGA output socket. I don't know if I'm calling it by its
    > correct name, but I have a VGA card that has both sockets, and also has a
    > converting adapter that was supplied with the card.


    Does it look like the picture and diagram here?

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface>

    The DVI-I variant has both digital and analog outputs. A digital
    connection is done with a direct cable to the monitor. An analog
    connection to a 15-pin D-sub VGA port can be done with a simple rewiring
    adapter.

    A monitor's DVI input is usually DVI-D (digital only).

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Oct 26, 2008
    #10
  11. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 20:18:55 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've only ever seen two types (three actually) of inputs for monitors -
    >>> VGA (including digital VGA) cables and RGB cables.

    >>
    >> What's this "digital VGA", then?

    >
    > It is standard analogue VGA, but with extra pins carrying digital signals
    > in addition to the analogue VGA stuff.


    I think you mean DVI, either DVI-I or DVI-A, but not DVI-D.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 26, 2008
    #11
  12. EMB

    Murray Symon Guest

    Carnations wrote:

    > On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 11:44:27 +1300, David Empson wrote:
    >
    >>> A simple adapter is all that is required to plug in a regular VGA
    >>> monitor into the digital VGA output socket. I don't know if I'm calling
    >>> it by its correct name, but I have a VGA card that has both sockets,
    >>> and also has a converting adapter that was supplied with the card.

    >>
    >> Does it look like the picture and diagram here?
    >>
    >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface>
    >>
    >> The DVI-I variant has both digital and analog outputs. A digital
    >> connection is done with a direct cable to the monitor. An analog
    >> connection to a 15-pin D-sub VGA port can be done with a simple rewiring
    >> adapter.
    >>
    >> A monitor's DVI input is usually DVI-D (digital only).

    >
    > Hi.
    >
    > Yes - that is the exact one I was referring to.
    >
    > As I said, the video card came with an adaptor to convert the DVI socket
    > into a VGA socket (resulting in the video card capable of running two VGA
    > monitors) or one VGA and one DVI.
    >
    > Why do you call the VGA socket a "D-Sub"? (Yes its "D" shaped, but what
    > do you mean by "sub"?)


    "Sub" short for sub-miniature.
    The original standard DB15 was a larger connector (as used in the IBM
    PC game port) which shared the same specs as the DB9 and DB25 (e.g.
    PC serial port and PC parallel printer port). The IBM CGA and EGA
    monitors used a DB9 connector.
    The original standard connectors all had 2 rows of pins with one row
    having one more than the other row (so the total was always odd),
    resulting in the "D" shape.
    The D-sub 15 crammed 15 pins into a connector that was the same size
    as the original DB9 by using 3 rows of pins.
    Murray Symon, Oct 27, 2008
    #12
  13. In message <ge322i$1d3o$>, Murray Symon wrote:

    > The original standard DB15 ...


    DA-15.

    > ... which shared the same specs as the DB9 ...


    DE-9.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 27, 2008
    #13
  14. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 11:50:31 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 20:18:55 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I've only ever seen two types (three actually) of inputs for monitors
    >>>>> - VGA (including digital VGA) cables and RGB cables.
    >>>>
    >>>> What's this "digital VGA", then?
    >>>
    >>> It is standard analogue VGA, but with extra pins carrying digital
    >>> signals in addition to the analogue VGA stuff.

    >>
    >> I think you mean DVI, either DVI-I or DVI-A, but not DVI-D.

    >
    > I think you'll find that the socket on the video card can do all the
    > above ...


    Not likely. Try connecting between DVI-D and VGA, and you'll see what I
    mean.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 27, 2008
    #14
  15. EMB

    Richard Guest

    Murray Symon wrote:
    > Carnations wrote:


    > "Sub" short for sub-miniature.
    > The original standard DB15 was a larger connector (as used in the IBM
    > PC game port) which shared the same specs as the DB9 and DB25 (e.g.
    > PC serial port and PC parallel printer port). The IBM CGA and EGA
    > monitors used a DB9 connector.
    > The original standard connectors all had 2 rows of pins with one row
    > having one more than the other row (so the total was always odd),
    > resulting in the "D" shape.
    > The D-sub 15 crammed 15 pins into a connector that was the same size
    > as the original DB9 by using 3 rows of pins.


    I thought the VGA plug was a DB15 whereas the gameports were just a D15?
    Richard, Oct 27, 2008
    #15
  16. EMB

    Richard Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:


    > Not likely. Try connecting between DVI-D and VGA, and you'll see what I
    > mean.


    Then there are the cards that have a dvi-i plug on them but will not
    support the analog pins, and only have that plug so that people with the
    wrong cable can use it. Wasted a very long time on that and an adapter
    till I figured it out..
    Richard, Oct 27, 2008
    #16
  17. EMB

    Murray Symon Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > In message <ge322i$1d3o$>, Murray Symon wrote:
    >
    >> The original standard DB15 ...

    >
    > DA-15.
    >
    >> ... which shared the same specs as the DB9 ...

    >
    > DE-9.


    OK, I'll accept that may well be more correct. My post was
    done entirely from memory dating back to 1980's / early 1990's.
    They were commonly only ever referred to as DB-n.

    Murray.
    Murray Symon, Oct 27, 2008
    #17
  18. In message <ge3ggp$1ii8$>, Murray Symon wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <ge322i$1d3o$>, Murray Symon wrote:
    >>
    >>> The original standard DB15 ...

    >>
    >> DA-15.
    >>
    >>> ... which shared the same specs as the DB9 ...

    >>
    >> DE-9.

    >
    > They were commonly only ever referred to as DB-n.


    That is true. But the letter after the D was supposed to indicate the size
    of the shell. Since DB-25 seemed to be the most popular one, everybody
    tended to assume that the other sizes were DB as well.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 27, 2008
    #18
  19. EMB

    Richard Guest

    OZZY Boy wrote:

    >> The DVI-I variant has both digital and analog outputs. A digital
    >> connection is done with a direct cable to the monitor. An analog
    >> connection to a 15-pin D-sub VGA port can be done with a simple rewiring
    >> adapter.
    >>
    >> A monitor's DVI input is usually DVI-D (digital only).

    >
    >
    >
    > I am referring to the Cable..?
    >
    > The Cable I am using is a DVI one so how will that work with a VGA Only PS..????


    Sounds to me that you are ill equiped to be involved with repair of PCs
    in that case
    Richard, Oct 27, 2008
    #19
  20. EMB

    EMB Guest

    Murray Symon wrote:
    > Carnations wrote:
    >> Why do you call the VGA socket a "D-Sub"? (Yes its "D" shaped, but what
    >> do you mean by "sub"?)

    >
    > "Sub" short for sub-miniature.
    > The original standard DB15 was a larger connector (as used in the IBM
    > PC game port) which shared the same specs as the DB9 and DB25 (e.g.
    > PC serial port and PC parallel printer port). The IBM CGA and EGA
    > monitors used a DB9 connector.
    > The original standard connectors all had 2 rows of pins with one row
    > having one more than the other row (so the total was always odd),
    > resulting in the "D" shape.
    > The D-sub 15 crammed 15 pins into a connector that was the same size
    > as the original DB9 by using 3 rows of pins.


    Incorrect, the original 9-pin was a d-sub connector. It's 15 pin
    lookalike is a HD* d-sub connector.

    * high density
    EMB, Oct 27, 2008
    #20
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