Re: HDD Data Recovery

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by smackedass, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. smackedass

    smackedass Guest

    Ahem...

    Maybe I missed something in the exchange, but...

    Did you try what I mentioned: installing the sick drive as a secondary drive
    in another machine?

    All of the other suggestions notwithstanding, I believe that this may be a
    path of minimal resistance. That is, if it works...no guarantees, but it'd
    be the FIRST thing that I'd try. Have done this on dozens of occasions.

    smackedass
    smackedass, Aug 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. Dave Hardenbrook wrote:
    > smackedass wrote:
    >> Did you try what I mentioned: installing the sick drive as a secondary
    >> drive in another machine?

    >
    > I tried installing the drive as the *Primary* in another system. Might
    > installing as a Secondary really make a difference?


    Absolutely!

    It would now be a secondary "data" drive in the other system. You would
    still boot from the other systems normal drive, but access the failing
    drive to try and recover the data.

    You can install the drive internally (after rejumpering as slave) or
    temporarily install the drive in one of those external USB drive
    enclosures. It's an easy way to see if the drive has any hopes of being
    "easily" recovered. You'll probably never trust it again for booting or
    storing data, but at least you can get the data off of the drive.

    Let us know how you make out

    John
    --
    John Dearing
    A+, Network+, Server+
    To reply, just drop "YOURPANTS" from my addy
    John P. Dearing, Aug 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. smackedass

    smackedass Guest

    "Mister" <not_a_chance@this_email_address.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I keep an IDE to USB connector with an external power supply handy for
    > these occasions. $15 on eBay.


    Yes, I've got one also, mine has 3 adapters, one for a laptop (not always
    compatible, but often is), one for a standard IDE, and one for a SATA. Mine
    cost me $30, from MacSales, don't let the name confuse you, it's every bit
    MS compatible. A bargain at any price, almost.

    However, this is not absolutely necessary to have this gadget in hand, to
    attempt to accomplish what Mr. H. needs to. A working XP box, an IDE cable
    with 3 connectors (one for the board), the documentation necessary to set
    Primary/Secondary or Master/Slave or Cable Select/Cable Select, are all he
    needs.

    smackedass
    smackedass, Aug 30, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <zu6Jg.7637$4O4.5749@trnddc02>,
    says...

    > You can install the drive internally (after rejumpering as slave) or
    > temporarily install the drive in one of those external USB drive
    > enclosures. It's an easy way to see if the drive has any hopes of being
    > "easily" recovered. You'll probably never trust it again for booting or
    > storing data, but at least you can get the data off of the drive.
    >
    > Let us know how you make out


    Well, I tried installing the drive as a secondary data drive, and when I
    booted up (under Win 2000), before reaching the splash screen, I got
    STOP error 0x0007F -- UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP. When I disconnected
    the drive the STOP error went away and Windows booted normally.

    Deciding to have one last go, I reconnected the drive and booted again.
    This time Windows booted normally, but the drive did not show up in My
    Computer (not surprising). I then tried to run DiskProbe, but it only
    detected the good drive as "PhysicalDrive1". It couldn't see the bad
    drive at all. Then I tried booting to Safe Mode, but it hung at the
    "Windows is Starting Up" message, just before the login window (even the
    power button wouldn't respond).

    Finally, I booted using the DOS version of Partition Magic. Lo and
    behold, PM *could* see the drive, but reported that there were no
    partition tables. (As did Maxtor's own diagnostics.)

    So that's where I am -- PM is the only thing I can get to detect the
    drive, but I can guess that if I try to do anything with *it*, I'll
    really screw things up.

    So is this the end of the line? My client reports that much (but not
    all) of the vital documents on the drive are in hard copy. So maybe is
    it not worth going on?

    --
    Dave
    Dave Hardenbrook, Sep 2, 2006
    #4
  5. smackedass

    SBFan2000 Guest

    I had that same thing on a drive not to long ago. Windows couldn't see the
    drive, but Bios could. I finally got windows to see it but it reported it
    with no partitions of any kind. I used DataGetBack for ntfs and recovered
    about 50% of the contents!


    "Dave Hardenbrook" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <zu6Jg.7637$4O4.5749@trnddc02>,
    > says...
    >
    > > You can install the drive internally (after rejumpering as slave) or
    > > temporarily install the drive in one of those external USB drive
    > > enclosures. It's an easy way to see if the drive has any hopes of being
    > > "easily" recovered. You'll probably never trust it again for booting or
    > > storing data, but at least you can get the data off of the drive.
    > >
    > > Let us know how you make out

    >
    > Well, I tried installing the drive as a secondary data drive, and when I
    > booted up (under Win 2000), before reaching the splash screen, I got
    > STOP error 0x0007F -- UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP. When I disconnected
    > the drive the STOP error went away and Windows booted normally.
    >
    > Deciding to have one last go, I reconnected the drive and booted again.
    > This time Windows booted normally, but the drive did not show up in My
    > Computer (not surprising). I then tried to run DiskProbe, but it only
    > detected the good drive as "PhysicalDrive1". It couldn't see the bad
    > drive at all. Then I tried booting to Safe Mode, but it hung at the
    > "Windows is Starting Up" message, just before the login window (even the
    > power button wouldn't respond).
    >
    > Finally, I booted using the DOS version of Partition Magic. Lo and
    > behold, PM *could* see the drive, but reported that there were no
    > partition tables. (As did Maxtor's own diagnostics.)
    >
    > So that's where I am -- PM is the only thing I can get to detect the
    > drive, but I can guess that if I try to do anything with *it*, I'll
    > really screw things up.
    >
    > So is this the end of the line? My client reports that much (but not
    > all) of the vital documents on the drive are in hard copy. So maybe is
    > it not worth going on?
    >
    > --
    > Dave
    SBFan2000, Sep 2, 2006
    #5
  6. smackedass

    Guest

    Why don`t you try booting with a Linux CD Called Knoppix? I have use
    it to recover some information of windows XP NTFS drives. Read this
    article.

    read this article: http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3214

    Let us know how it goes.
    Regards.

    SBFan2000 wrote:
    > I had that same thing on a drive not to long ago. Windows couldn't see the
    > drive, but Bios could. I finally got windows to see it but it reported it
    > with no partitions of any kind. I used DataGetBack for ntfs and recovered
    > about 50% of the contents!
    >
    >
    > "Dave Hardenbrook" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <zu6Jg.7637$4O4.5749@trnddc02>,
    > > says...
    > >
    > > > You can install the drive internally (after rejumpering as slave) or
    > > > temporarily install the drive in one of those external USB drive
    > > > enclosures. It's an easy way to see if the drive has any hopes of being
    > > > "easily" recovered. You'll probably never trust it again for booting or
    > > > storing data, but at least you can get the data off of the drive.
    > > >
    > > > Let us know how you make out

    > >
    > > Well, I tried installing the drive as a secondary data drive, and when I
    > > booted up (under Win 2000), before reaching the splash screen, I got
    > > STOP error 0x0007F -- UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP. When I disconnected
    > > the drive the STOP error went away and Windows booted normally.
    > >
    > > Deciding to have one last go, I reconnected the drive and booted again.
    > > This time Windows booted normally, but the drive did not show up in My
    > > Computer (not surprising). I then tried to run DiskProbe, but it only
    > > detected the good drive as "PhysicalDrive1". It couldn't see the bad
    > > drive at all. Then I tried booting to Safe Mode, but it hung at the
    > > "Windows is Starting Up" message, just before the login window (even the
    > > power button wouldn't respond).
    > >
    > > Finally, I booted using the DOS version of Partition Magic. Lo and
    > > behold, PM *could* see the drive, but reported that there were no
    > > partition tables. (As did Maxtor's own diagnostics.)
    > >
    > > So that's where I am -- PM is the only thing I can get to detect the
    > > drive, but I can guess that if I try to do anything with *it*, I'll
    > > really screw things up.
    > >
    > > So is this the end of the line? My client reports that much (but not
    > > all) of the vital documents on the drive are in hard copy. So maybe is
    > > it not worth going on?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Dave
    , Sep 2, 2006
    #6
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