Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by nospam, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <>,
    Soundhaspriority <> wrote:

    > In some cases, a memory requirement can be addressed by either flash or hard
    > drive. In the case of a Sound Devices 744T, I chose to stick with the hard
    > drive. My personal "feeling", which I can't substantiate with any hard info,
    > is that some hard drives, selected for both make and particular model, and
    > handled and mounted to avoid mechanical shock, are more reliable than flash
    > alternatives.


    nonsense. flash is significantly more reliable than hard drives.
    nospam, Jul 21, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. > Current data suggest easily twice as reliable.

    Under what conditions?

    I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly use flash memory
    for the boot drive. But I guarantee there will be nothing on that drive that
    has to be continually re- or over-written.

    All the user-created files will be on a conventional hard drive -- unless I
    can be convinced that flash drive is sufficiently reliable.

    Of course, I create a bootable copy of my current computer's drive every one
    to three weeks, and keep intermediate copies of important files on a Zip
    drive. I also periodically back up all user data to an external hard drive.

    By the way, my Seagate hard drives are warranteed for five years and have
    given me no trouble. Name a consumer flash drive that has that long a
    warranty.
    William Sommerwerck, Jul 23, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. nospam

    Neil Gould Guest

    William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >> Current data suggest easily twice as reliable.

    >
    > Under what conditions?
    >
    > I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly use flash
    > memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there will be nothing on
    > that drive that has to be continually re- or over-written.
    >

    Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no re-or over-writing?

    --
    best regards,

    Neil
    Neil Gould, Jul 23, 2012
    #3
  4. nospam

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Monday, July 23, 2012 2:03:33 PM UTC+1, William Sommerwerck wrote:
    > &gt; Current data suggest easily twice as reliable.
    >
    > Under what conditions?


    It's an intresting point as you could have 2-3 backps to hard drivs for the cost of one SSD.

    >
    > I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly use flash memory
    > for the boot drive. But I guarantee there will be nothing on that drive that
    > has to be continually re- or over-written.


    What about swap files and temp files such as caches for browswers and the like.

    >
    > All the user-created files will be on a conventional hard drive -- unless I
    > can be convinced that flash drive is sufficiently reliable.


    I think it is, but that's not the reason to choose between Hard and flash drives. SSD are chosen because of their speed nothing else, in fact some even use more power than conventional drives so for laptop use make sure you have a low power one.


    >
    > Of course, I create a bootable copy of my current computer's drive every one
    > to three weeks, and keep intermediate copies of important files on a Zip
    > drive.


    Aren't ZIP drives the least relible ....
    I have 3 ZIP readers only one still works, not using ZIP as backup since 2005.


    >I also periodically back up all user data to an external hard drive.
    >
    > By the way, my Seagate hard drives are warranteed for five years and have
    > given me no trouble. Name a consumer flash drive that has that long a
    > warranty.


    I'm not sure SSDs have settled down as HD have in that most HD are pretty much the same, but there;s differnces with SSDs there's cheap consumer and teh more relible faster SSDs, they aren't the same.
    I used to see server HDs that spun at 10,000 rpm not sure what spec SSDs might be used to repalce them.
    Whisky-dave, Jul 23, 2012
    #4
  5. >> I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly
    >> use flash memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there
    >> will be nothing on that drive that has to be continually
    >> re- or over-written.


    > Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no
    > re-or over-writing?


    READ WHAT I WROTE!
    William Sommerwerck, Jul 23, 2012
    #5
  6. >> Of course, I create a bootable copy of my current computer's
    >> drive every one to three weeks, and keep intermediate copies
    >> of important files on a Zip drive. I also periodically back up all
    >> user data to an external hard drive.


    > If you don't back up to two external locations your data means
    > nothing to you.


    Do you mean outside the house? If so, point valid and taken. If that isn't
    what you meant, READ WHAT I WROTE.

    Why do people insist on reading what they think is there, rather than what
    actually is?


    >> By the way, my Seagate hard drives are warranteed for five
    >> years and have given me no trouble. Name a consumer flash
    >> drive that has that long a warranty.


    > The warranty on the Seagate drives is meaningless. When the
    > drive fails you get another drive. Big deal. You don't get your
    > data back and that is typically many more times valuable
    > than the drive.


    You didn't answer my question.


    > I have yet to hear of a MacBook Air user having issues with their flash
    > disk. The MBA has been out there for over 4 years - and it only had 64
    > GB of SSD making it a candidate for early failure (due to the wear
    > leveling management).


    Well... Mac Book Air owners don't actually /do/ anything with their
    computers. They just carry it around to show off, and occasionally some
    piddly thing with it.
    William Sommerwerck, Jul 23, 2012
    #6
  7. nospam

    Neil Gould Guest

    William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >>> I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly
    >>> use flash memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there
    >>> will be nothing on that drive that has to be continually
    >>> re- or over-written.

    >
    >> Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no
    >> re-or over-writing?

    >
    > READ WHAT I WROTE!
    >

    MY RESPONSE WAS SPECIFICALLY IN REFERENCE TO WHAT YOU WROTE!

    Or, don't you know how an OS works?

    --
    best regards,

    Neil
    Neil Gould, Jul 23, 2012
    #7
  8. nospam

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    Neil Gould <> wrote:
    >William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >>>> I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly
    >>>> use flash memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there
    >>>> will be nothing on that drive that has to be continually
    >>>> re- or over-written.

    >>
    >>> Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no
    >>> re-or over-writing?

    >>
    >> READ WHAT I WROTE!
    >>

    >MY RESPONSE WAS SPECIFICALLY IN REFERENCE TO WHAT YOU WROTE!
    >
    >Or, don't you know how an OS works?


    Neil, he's saying that he's using it in a read-only (or read-mostly)
    application, so it doesn't matter what the OS does.

    This is really the perfect application for the things.
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    Scott Dorsey, Jul 23, 2012
    #8
  9. nospam

    Neil Gould Guest

    Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > Neil Gould <> wrote:
    >> William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >>>>> I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly
    >>>>> use flash memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there
    >>>>> will be nothing on that drive that has to be continually
    >>>>> re- or over-written.
    >>>
    >>>> Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no
    >>>> re-or over-writing?
    >>>
    >>> READ WHAT I WROTE!
    >>>

    >> MY RESPONSE WAS SPECIFICALLY IN REFERENCE TO WHAT YOU WROTE!
    >>
    >> Or, don't you know how an OS works?

    >
    > Neil, he's saying that he's using it in a read-only (or read-mostly)
    > application, so it doesn't matter what the OS does.
    >

    It very much matters what the OS does, unless one can significantly
    reconfigure the OS or use an OS that doesn't depend on virtual memory. To my
    understanding, neither has been made easier with more recent OSs.

    --
    best regards,

    Neil
    Neil Gould, Jul 23, 2012
    #9
  10. nospam

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    In article <jujnv3$pn5$>,
    Neil Gould <> wrote:
    >Scott Dorsey wrote:
    >> Neil Gould <> wrote:
    >>> William Sommerwerck wrote:
    >>>>>> I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly
    >>>>>> use flash memory for the boot drive. But I guarantee there
    >>>>>> will be nothing on that drive that has to be continually
    >>>>>> re- or over-written.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Interesting. What OS are you using that guarantees no
    >>>>> re-or over-writing?
    >>>>
    >>>> READ WHAT I WROTE!
    >>>>
    >>> MY RESPONSE WAS SPECIFICALLY IN REFERENCE TO WHAT YOU WROTE!
    >>>
    >>> Or, don't you know how an OS works?

    >>
    >> Neil, he's saying that he's using it in a read-only (or read-mostly)
    >> application, so it doesn't matter what the OS does.

    >
    >It very much matters what the OS does, unless one can significantly
    >reconfigure the OS or use an OS that doesn't depend on virtual memory. To my
    >understanding, neither has been made easier with more recent OSs.


    No, he's not paging or swapping to the flash drive. That is instant death.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    Scott Dorsey, Jul 23, 2012
    #10
  11. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <jujo2e$rm5$>, Scott Dorsey
    <> wrote:

    > No, he's not paging or swapping to the flash drive. That is instant death.


    nonsense. millions of macs have swap on ssd and run just fine and have
    for several years.
    nospam, Jul 23, 2012
    #11
  12. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >Pretty hard for the "boot" (system) drive to avoid being written on as
    > >the system operates.

    >
    > There is no reason that it needs to be written to. In
    > fact it is very easy to have a system that boots from a
    > DVD!


    although it's possible, it's rare. most unix systems boot from writable
    media, either hard drive or ssd, and swap space is on it, not that it
    matters since ssd is more reliable than a hard drive would be.
    nospam, Jul 23, 2012
    #12
  13. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <jujkj1$28a$>, William Sommerwerck
    <> wrote:

    > Well... Mac Book Air owners don't actually /do/ anything with their
    > computers. They just carry it around to show off, and occasionally some
    > piddly thing with it.


    actually they do quite a bit, as do macbook pro and imac users, which
    can be configured with ssd, or added later.
    nospam, Jul 23, 2012
    #13
  14. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <juji2p$j8i$>, William Sommerwerck
    <> wrote:

    > > Current data suggest easily twice as reliable.

    >
    > Under what conditions?


    all conditions, and likely much more than twice.

    > I'm about to buy a new computer, and will almost certainly use flash memory
    > for the boot drive. But I guarantee there will be nothing on that drive that
    > has to be continually re- or over-written.
    >
    > All the user-created files will be on a conventional hard drive -- unless I
    > can be convinced that flash drive is sufficiently reliable.


    it looks like your mind is made up and aren't interested in facts,
    however, flash is definitely more reliable and *substantially* faster.

    > Of course, I create a bootable copy of my current computer's drive every one
    > to three weeks, and keep intermediate copies of important files on a Zip
    > drive. I also periodically back up all user data to an external hard drive.


    you should be doing backups a *lot* more frequently and better yet,
    have it automated so you don't need to do anything for it to happen.

    also, zip drives are about the worst possible backup media and too
    small to be of much use even if they were reliable.

    > By the way, my Seagate hard drives are warranteed for five years and have
    > given me no trouble.


    actually, they may only be warranted for 1 year, which is the shortest
    in the industry (western digital is 2 year):

    <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/12/16/seagate_cutting_warranties/>

    Seagate is cutting most Barracuda and Momentus warranty periods down
    to one year with others moving from five-year warranties to three.

    > Name a consumer flash drive that has that long a
    > warranty.


    10 year warranty:
    <http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Patriot-Memory-SSD-Warranty-Torqx,8222.
    html>
    The company is also backing the new drives with a huge 10-year
    warranty, apparently the first of its kind in the industry.

    5 year warranty:
    <http://newsroom.intel.com/community/intel_newsroom/blog/2011/05/19/chip-
    shot-new-5-year-limited-warranty-on-intel-ssd-320>

    Confident in the enhanced reliability features of its recently
    introduced third-generation solid-state drive (SSD), Intel announced
    it has extended its limited warranty for the IntelĀ® SSD 320 Series
    from three years to five years.
    nospam, Jul 23, 2012
    #14
  15. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >> >Pretty hard for the "boot" (system) drive to avoid being written on as
    > >> >the system operates.
    > >>
    > >> There is no reason that it needs to be written to. In
    > >> fact it is very easy to have a system that boots from a
    > >> DVD!

    > >
    > >although it's possible, it's rare. most unix systems boot from writable
    > >media, either hard drive or ssd, and swap space is on it, not that it
    > >matters since ssd is more reliable than a hard drive would be.

    >
    > Rare?


    yes.

    > Look at all those distribution "live DVD" disks. They're pretty
    > common.


    what about them? how many people boot off a live dvd as part of their
    normal day to day usage? nowhere near as many who boot off a hard drive
    or ssd.

    some computers, namely ultrabooks, don't even have dvd drives. sure you
    could hook one up, but that defeats the point of having an ultrabook.

    just because something is possible doesn't mean it's commonly done.

    > Look at Android.


    bad example. android writes back to flash, as does ios.

    > Look at all those millions of WIFI routers.


    why? embedded devices are single purpose devices and do not have swap
    space, so they do not count.

    > Sheesh, even the WT-5 wireless from Nikon runs Linux that boots from
    > a read only device.


    see above regarding embedded devices.
    nospam, Jul 23, 2012
    #15
  16. nospam

    Trevor Guest

    "Scott Dorsey" <> wrote in message
    news:jujo2e$rm5$...
    >>> Neil, he's saying that he's using it in a read-only (or read-mostly)
    >>> application, so it doesn't matter what the OS does.

    >>
    >>It very much matters what the OS does, unless one can significantly
    >>reconfigure the OS or use an OS that doesn't depend on virtual memory. To
    >>my
    >>understanding, neither has been made easier with more recent OSs.

    >
    > No, he's not paging or swapping to the flash drive. That is instant
    > death.


    Easy enough to configure the paging drive to a different drive from the boot
    drive with any version of Windows. However these days you can just add more
    RAM and not use a swap drive at all.

    Trevor.
    Trevor, Jul 24, 2012
    #16
  17. nospam

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    In article <juknp5$97l$>, Trevor <> wrote:
    >"Scott Dorsey" <> wrote in message
    >news:jujo2e$rm5$...
    >>>> Neil, he's saying that he's using it in a read-only (or read-mostly)
    >>>> application, so it doesn't matter what the OS does.
    >>>
    >>>It very much matters what the OS does, unless one can significantly
    >>>reconfigure the OS or use an OS that doesn't depend on virtual memory. To
    >>>my
    >>>understanding, neither has been made easier with more recent OSs.

    >>
    >> No, he's not paging or swapping to the flash drive. That is instant
    >> death.

    >
    >Easy enough to configure the paging drive to a different drive from the boot
    >drive with any version of Windows. However these days you can just add more
    >RAM and not use a swap drive at all.


    Precisely! Virtual memory has become almost superfluous with such large
    address spaces available so cheaply.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    Scott Dorsey, Jul 24, 2012
    #17
  18. nospam

    nospam Guest

    In article <juknp5$97l$>, Trevor <>
    wrote:

    > Easy enough to configure the paging drive to a different drive from the boot
    > drive with any version of Windows.


    not when there isn't a second drive available, such as in a laptop,
    which is exactly where you are most likely to find ssd. plus, putting
    virtual memory swap on an hd is dumb. it's much better to keep it on
    the much faster ssd.
    nospam, Jul 24, 2012
    #18
  19. nospam

    Trevor Guest

    "Scott Dorsey" <> wrote in message
    news:jukojv$mor$...
    > Precisely! Virtual memory has become almost superfluous with such large
    > address spaces available so cheaply.


    I'd agree except for the "almost"!
    I've been increasing speed by turning off the swap file for years.

    Trevor.
    Trevor, Jul 24, 2012
    #19
  20. nospam

    Trevor Guest

    "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >>I've been increasing speed by turning off the swap file for years.

    >
    > Turning off the swap file should not increase speed.
    >
    > First, if you are actually swapping out running programs, turning
    > off swap is not going help anything but will probably cause either
    > a system crash or some programs to be killed.
    >
    > But second, and I have no idea if Windows does this or not but any
    > decent OS should swap out inactive data segments to provide more
    > RAM for use as disk cache. That is, allowing at least some swap to
    > be used will result in a faster system overall.


    Like with all things, *IF* Windows did everything perfectly there would be
    no need to optimise it for your own use. Unfortunately it doesn't. Writing
    swap files when there is plenty of RAM, and no need for more space is
    something it does by default. In fact the more RAM you have the bigger it
    thinks the swap file should be by default.
    I never suggested one should disable the swap file if you don't have enough
    system RAM, that's just silly. However these days when 16GB RAM is not
    exceptional or even very expensive, thinking that Windows is going to manage
    it for best use is still wishful thinking IME.
    YMMV.

    Trevor.
    Trevor, Jul 24, 2012
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. David Taylor

    Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

    David Taylor, Jul 22, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    289
    nospam
    Jul 22, 2012
  2. Steve King

    Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

    Steve King, Jul 23, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    295
    David Ruether
    Jul 30, 2012
  3. Robert Coe

    Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

    Robert Coe, Jul 25, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    331
    nospam
    Jul 25, 2012
  4. Scott Dorsey

    Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

    Scott Dorsey, Jul 25, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    291
    Les Cargill
    Jul 25, 2012
  5. Scott Dorsey

    Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?

    Scott Dorsey, Jul 25, 2012, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    313
    Scott Dorsey
    Jul 25, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page