Re: Hard drives

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by TheStoneCrusher, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a musical
    term for louder.

    "Claude Hopper" <> wrote in message
    news:gigfg2$lpj$...
    > Claude Hopper expostulated:
    >
    >> Some awe 5400 wpm and some awe 7200 wpm. Some hawe 2 MB of cache and
    >> some hawe 8 MB of cache. De access times and th-th-thowugh puts seem
    >> t-t-t-to not wawy gweatwy. So which is th-th-the most adwentitious in
    >> which combination?

    >
    > DOH! The higher favoured numbers not your forte?
    >
     
    TheStoneCrusher, Jan 6, 2009
    #1
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  2. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 17:26:12 -0500, TheStoneCrusher wrote:

    > "Claude Hopper" <> wrote in message
    > news:gigfg2$lpj$...
    >> Claude Hopper expostulated:
    >>
    >>> Some awe 5400 wpm and some awe 7200 wpm. Some hawe 2 MB of cache and
    >>> some hawe 8 MB of cache. De access times and th-th-thowugh puts seem
    >>> t-t-t-to not wawy gweatwy. So which is th-th-the most adwentitious in
    >>> which combination?

    >>
    >> DOH! The higher favoured numbers not your forte?
    >>


    > The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    > musical term for louder.
    >



    Colloquial English not your forte?


    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #2
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  3. TheStoneCrusher

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 6 Jan 2009 17:26:12 -0500, "TheStoneCrusher"
    <> wrote:

    >The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a musical
    >term for louder.


    Obviously language isn't your forte.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/forte
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Jan 7, 2009
    #3
  4. TheStoneCrusher

    RickMerrill Guest

    Aardvark wrote:
    > On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 17:26:12 -0500, TheStoneCrusher wrote:
    >
    >> "Claude Hopper" <> wrote in message
    >> news:gigfg2$lpj$...
    >>> Claude Hopper expostulated:
    >>>
    >>>> Some awe 5400 wpm and some awe 7200 wpm. Some hawe 2 MB of cache and
    >>>> some hawe 8 MB of cache. De access times and th-th-thowugh puts seem
    >>>> t-t-t-to not wawy gweatwy. So which is th-th-the most adwentitious in
    >>>> which combination?
    >>> DOH! The higher favoured numbers not your forte?
    >>>

    >
    >> The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    >> musical term for louder.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Colloquial English not your forte?
    >
    >


    Somebody is missing an accent mark!?
     
    RickMerrill, Jan 7, 2009
    #4
  5. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 20:13:20 -0500, RickMerrill wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >> On Tue, 06 Jan 2009 17:26:12 -0500, TheStoneCrusher wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Claude Hopper" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:gigfg2$lpj$...
    >>>> Claude Hopper expostulated:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Some awe 5400 wpm and some awe 7200 wpm. Some hawe 2 MB of cache and
    >>>>> some hawe 8 MB of cache. De access times and th-th-thowugh puts seem
    >>>>> t-t-t-to not wawy gweatwy. So which is th-th-the most adwentitious
    >>>>> in which combination?
    >>>> DOH! The higher favoured numbers not your forte?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    >>> musical term for louder.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Colloquial English not your forte?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Somebody is missing an accent mark!?


    Nope. Not at all. It's a Latin/Italian word. It may have escaped your
    notice but there are no accents used in Latin or Italian.

    Were you labouring under the misapprehension that the word 'forte' in
    this context has its roots in the French language?



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #5
  6. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 10:25:02 +0100, claudius wrote:

    > "Aardvark" <> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:1AT8l.164614$2...
    >>
    >> Nope. Not at all. It's a Latin/Italian word.

    >
    > Right.
    >
    >> .... there are no accents used in Latin or Italian.

    >
    > Wrong. "We" use accents (for example: é, è, ù...).


    My mistake, then, and apologies. I've never been aware of accents in
    modern Italian.

    I studied Latin for four years at school and I can't recall ever seeing
    accents in that written language although there may, I will concede, have
    been some if they are used in modern Italian. I recall that in Greek
    there were a small number of accents but when we were writing that
    language there was only one that we ever used although I never knew what
    it was called. It was a tiny 'c' over a vowel which indicated that vowel,
    when spoken, should be aspirated- it effectively made one pronounce as if
    the letter 'h' were in front of that vowel.

    Would you mind explaining to me their usage in Italian and their effects
    on the pronunciation of vowels? What are they called (ie in French there
    are acute and grave accents, circumflex and cedilla which all affect
    pronunciation of certain letters)?



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #6
  7. TheStoneCrusher

    SteveBell Guest


    >The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    >musical term for louder.


    You're mostly right.
    "forte" is a French word that means "strength" or "strong".
    "forte" is an Italian word that means "loud".
    Both of them are pronounced the same way, at least by people who don't
    speak French or Italian.

    --
    Steve Bell
    New Life Home Improvement
    Arlington, TX USA
     
    SteveBell, Jan 7, 2009
    #7
  8. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 14:26:24 +0000, SteveBell wrote:

    >>The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    >>musical term for louder.

    >
    > You're mostly right.
    > "forte" is a French word that means "strength" or "strong".

    "forte" is
    > an Italian word that means "loud".
    > Both of them are pronounced the same way, at least by people who don't
    > speak French or Italian.


    Is this an erudite American I see before me?

    (With apologies to William Shakespeare, all his descendants, his
    ancestors, his milkman, his next-door neighbour, that bloke with the
    funny hat he met in the pub once, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera :))



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #8
  9. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 18:36:07 +0100, claudius wrote:

    <lots of informative stuff>

    Grazie! Io ti amo. Ciao :)



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #9
  10. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 18:51:51 +0100, claudius wrote:

    > "SteveBell" <> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:gk2e2g$hfc$...
    >>
    >>>The word is 'fort' not forte. A fort is a strong point; forte is a
    >>>musical term for louder.

    >>
    >> You're mostly right.
    >> "forte" is a French word that means "strength" or "strong".

    >
    > No, I think this word does not exist in French, it is solely Italian.
    >
    >> "forte" is an Italian word that means "loud".

    >
    > Quite right (in a musical contest), but mainy it means "strong" - in
    > all senses.
    >
    >> Both of them are pronounced the same way ...

    >
    > Well, a Frenchman (if he had such a word) would pronounce it "fòor
    > (t)", we more or less pronounce it "fò-rr-tay".




    There are two forms of the French adjective to which we are all
    referring: fort (pronounced 'FOR') which is the masculine adjectival form
    and 'forte' (pronounced 'FORT'), the feminine form.

    Unlike English, many languages have nouns which are either classed as
    'masculine' or 'feminine'. When adding adjectives to describe these
    nouns, the adjectives must be written in the correct 'gender'.

    For instance in French 'La maison verte' means 'the green house'.
    Definite article, noun and adjective are all in feminine gender so that
    they all match, gender-wise.

    Similarly 'Le ballon vert' means 'the green balloon'. Definite article,
    noun and adjective are all in the masculine grammatical gender.

    claudius- you will recognise the principle of grammatical gender from
    speaking and writing your own language, although to most English speakers
    who have no knowledge of languages other than their own, it will be
    somewhat complicated and mysterious. Perhaps you can supply us (tinu)
    with some Italian examples of masculine/feminine definite articles (il/
    la) and matching nouns and adjectives.

    English speakers: if you consider the above needlessly complicated (I
    don't) then consider the following: Latin and ancient Greek also had
    nouns which were grammatically neuter, and you really don't want to know
    about the number of verbal conjugations and their tenses- future, past,
    past perfect, past imperfect, pluperfect and a number of others the names
    of which at present escape me :)

    The present tense conjugation of the Latin verb 'esse' (to be) is the
    first I ever learnt at the age of 10:

    sum - I am
    es - you (singular) are
    est - he/she/it is
    sumus - we are
    estis - you (plural) are- no need for the Americanese 'y'all are' :)
    sunt - they are.

    Ain't language a fascinating subject? :)

    Old Latin teachers don't die, they just decline (a language joke :)).


    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #10
  11. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 20:30:45 +0100, claudius wrote:

    > "Aardvark" <> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:Gf79l.149368$2...
    >>
    >> Grazie!

    > Prego ! (Welcome!)
    >


    No need to translate that bit. I know THAT much Italian :)

    About twenty years ago, the sister of a friend of mine went to work in
    San Remo for the summer. When she came back to the UK, she brought with
    her a Calabrese called Natalino Barone with whom she had been working
    over there. Out of all my group of friends and acquaintances at the time
    i was the only one who could speak a European language, which was French.
    Natalino could also speak French, having worked in Paris for a few years,
    so he would seek me out to converse with. I think it helped him to feel
    less alone in England and I gladly practised my spoken French with him. A
    win-win situation. we became great friends and he taught me a smattering
    of his native language and some Sicilian, most of which I have since, to
    my shame, forgotten. He eventually married my friend's sister and the
    last I heard they owned an Italian restaurant in London :)

    > >Io ti amo.

    > Well, I'm not a girl :)))
    > (unless, saying that you "love" me, you would state particular sexual
    > inclinations ... )
    >


    Nah! It was just a phrase that sprung to mind :)

    > Ciao :)
    > Ciao! Pleased to have spoken with you.


    And I with you :).



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 7, 2009
    #11
  12. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 08 Jan 2009 09:19:04 +0100, claudius wrote:

    > "Aardvark" <> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:_K79l.149454$2...
    >>
    >> There are two forms of the French adjective to which we are all
    >> referring: fort (pronounced 'FOR') which is the masculine adjectival
    >> form and 'forte' (pronounced 'FORT'), the feminine form.

    >
    > You're perfectly right; I knew the French word "fort", but I had
    > completely skipped its feminine form "forte" when I said that "it does
    > not exist in French".
    > I really doubt, though, that this feminine adjective has anything to do
    > with the word "forte" as internationally understood.
    >


    As you know, I had already stated that the word 'forte' as originally
    discussed within a particular context did, indeed, have its roots in
    Latin/Italian. So no argument there from me :)

    >> claudius- you will recognise the principle of grammatical gender from
    >> speaking and writing your own language, although to most English
    >> speakers who have no knowledge of languages other than their own, it
    >> will be somewhat complicated and mysterious. Perhaps you can supply us
    >> (tinu) with some Italian examples of masculine/feminine definite
    >> articles (il/ la) and matching nouns and adjectives.

    >
    > To English-speaking people it may appear illogical attributing a
    > "gender" (a sex) to a book or a pen (in Italian, book is masculine: "il
    > libro"; pen is feminine: "la penna"), but to native Italians it is
    > clear that it is a convention, something that has nothing to do with a
    > real sex. As it happens in all languages for any linguistic mechanism,
    > you have just to learn them and then use them. Italian words ending in
    > -o are generally (VERY generally) masculine, ending in -a are
    > feminine. As we don't have your functional -s for forming plural nouns,
    > we generally form our plurals with a final -i (if masculine: "i libri")
    > or -e (if feminine: "le penne").
    > These very complicated rules got even more complicated owing to the fact
    > that there many exceptions and that adjectives and articles have their
    > own gender and plurals. Once again, practising Italian (and studying it
    > contemporarily) is the simplest way to learn it. English is apparently
    > much simpler, if we consider its grammar of words, but I can assure you
    > that it is very difficult to a stranger if we consider its construction
    > of phrases - leaving apart the pronounce of words, terribly difficult
    > for Italians who have only one (clear) sound for each letter.


    You'll be confusing some people here and making them think that your
    language (which I consider a somewhat 'musical' language when spoken) is
    confusing :) They'll be thinking: WTF the Italians have four fuckin'
    words for 'the' !!!!. :)

    There are some languages I enjoy listening to when spoken. The sound and
    tempo seem to me to embody the character of the nation the language
    represents. On the one hand Italian, French, Spanish and other Romance
    languages when spoken are somehow lyrical and affectionate-sounding.
    Compare that to Japanese, German and Afrikaans for instance. When spoken
    they are staccato and abrupt-sounding and somehow harder to listen to (at
    least to me). Afrikaans, especially, I find difficult to listen to for
    very long.

    I also enjoy the sound of spoken Hebrew or even Arabic, both languages
    which, to my ears, are two of the more lyrical well-known ones. Erse
    (Irish Gaelic and Scottish Gallic) lends itself well to poetry and song
    when spoken. I could listen to it all day long, despite having no
    comprehension of either.

    This said, I admire your grasp of the English language. You write with
    not a trace of Italian accent :). Too few native speakers of English
    ever take the time or trouble to learn a second language and it annoys me
    to see some English people trying to communicate with European people by
    speaking English slowly and loudly, as if anyone on the far side of the
    English Channel is like a slightly demented maiden aunt.

    Exempli gratia: When Gorbachev was in charge in Russia, in the days of
    Glasnost/Perestroika, a UK television reporter was conducting a vox pop
    in the streets of Moscow. He approached a STREET SWEEPER and asked if he
    spoke English. When the guy answered in the affirmative the reporter went
    on to ask the guy a series of questions. The guy answered every question
    in perfect unaccented English (well, with a slight American twang). A
    STREET SWEEPER for chrissakes! The fact that he was probably a nuclear
    physicist disallowed to work as such because of dissension or whatever is
    beside the point. The fact remains that other nationalities take more
    trouble to learn English than English speakers take to learn even a
    smattering of theirs. That embarrasses me to a large extent,
    demonstrating as it does a lack of good manners to say the least.

    Anyway, I've rambled on too much although I could continue all day on the
    subject- one of my pet peeves :)

    I have enjoyed/ am enjoying our exchange. Thank you claudius (or as the
    Romans used to write it, CLAVDIVS :)).



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 8, 2009
    #12
  13. TheStoneCrusher

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 08 Jan 2009 18:56:41 +0100, claudius wrote:

    >> The fact remains that other nationalities take more
    >> trouble to learn English than English speakers take to learn even a
    >> smattering of theirs. That embarrasses me to a large extent,
    >> demonstrating as it does a lack of good manners to say the least.
    >>

    > Why embarassing yourself? It's a matter of fact: English is an
    > international language, perhaps the only one; English-speaking persons
    > feel they can save themselves the trouble of learning another language
    > ... and they don't learn it, leaving the effort to those who do it for
    > personal interest or culture ...


    My brother did a back-packing tour of South America and some of the US in
    the 80s, finally ending up in Nicaragua 'helping the revolution' ;-) for
    a few months. Before he left Australia (where he lives) he took the
    trouble to learn South American Spanish before he left on his journey. It
    pleased the people he met in every country that he could speak their
    language and a few thought at first he was Chilean because of the accent
    he had acquired while learning the language.

    He said that if one wanted to spend time in another country, no matter
    how long, it's courteous to first learn at least a little of the
    language. How is it possible to absorb an alien culture fully without
    first doing so. I agree with that sentiment.



    --
    The month of March in this year of 2009 sees the centenary of the laying
    of the keel of the most famous (or infamous) ocean liner of all time, RMS
    Titanic, at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
    < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic>
     
    Aardvark, Jan 8, 2009
    #13
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