Re: Goldwave users: any way to eliminate "open air" noise fromconference recordings ...

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Meat Plow, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. Meat Plow

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 05:36:27 -0500, Fairfax wrote:

    > ... and to enhance the lecturer's voice?
    >
    > I recorded several hours of lectures with a new recorder without
    > realizing at first that the LP (long play) was terrible, unlike a
    > colleague's Sony digital recorder whose results even in LP were very
    > clear.
    >
    > If I could remove some of that "hiss" or noise that comes from a large,
    > cavernous lecture hall and somehow enhance the speaker's voice, that
    > would be of enormous help.
    >
    > Any tips to this regard greatly appreciated.


    I could easily do it in Sound Forge. GW should be similar enough to have
    a noise removal filter. I looked at their web site and there are tools
    built into GW to analyze and filter noises. Also present are enhancement
    tools. Your best bet is to experiment with a copy of the audio file.
    Maybe GW has real time previews like Sound Forge. That way you can test
    different filters before committing to changes.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Aug 31, 2010
    #1
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  2. Meat Plow

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 17:21:21 -0500, Fairfax wrote:

    > On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 14:38:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 05:36:27 -0500, Fairfax wrote:
    >>
    >>> ... and to enhance the lecturer's voice?
    >>>
    >>> I recorded several hours of lectures with a new recorder without
    >>> realizing at first that the LP (long play) was terrible, unlike a
    >>> colleague's Sony digital recorder whose results even in LP were very
    >>> clear.
    >>>
    >>> If I could remove some of that "hiss" or noise that comes from a
    >>> large, cavernous lecture hall and somehow enhance the speaker's voice,
    >>> that would be of enormous help.
    >>>
    >>> Any tips to this regard greatly appreciated.

    >>
    >>I could easily do it in Sound Forge. GW should be similar enough to have
    >>a noise removal filter. I looked at their web site and there are tools
    >>built into GW to analyze and filter noises. Also present are enhancement
    >>tools. Your best bet is to experiment with a copy of the audio file.
    >>Maybe GW has real time previews like Sound Forge. That way you can test
    >>different filters before committing to changes.

    >
    > Thanks. I gave this a try. I found it so far not worth the bother,
    > since the original voice recorder is wma and small and the result in MP3
    > was very large in comparison. When I tried re-encoding down to a lower
    > bitrate to get a more reasonable MP3 file size, the quality was just as
    > bad in the new MP3 where I supposedly reduced the noise.
    >
    > Not sure what to do next.
    >
    > Thanks for the great tip, though. I'll keep hunting around to see if
    > there are other solutions.


    If you get as much noise out as you can and EQ it for vocals GW should
    have a default or dedicated vocal processing set of tools, the file size
    should not be gigantic. Encoding the MP3 for say 22khz @ a variable bit
    rate around 48KB/s should not degrade the output. Like I said I have been
    at this for about 14 years and have multi track gear and software here at
    home so audio production and restoration is a piece of cake for me. I
    make some extra money restoring old recordings off tape and vinyl.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Aug 31, 2010
    #2
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  3. Meat Plow

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 09:29:52 -0500, Fairfax wrote:

    > On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 21:57:17 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 17:21:21 -0500, Fairfax wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 14:38:52 +0000 (UTC), Meat Plow
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 05:36:27 -0500, Fairfax wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> ... and to enhance the lecturer's voice?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I recorded several hours of lectures with a new recorder without
    >>>>> realizing at first that the LP (long play) was terrible, unlike a
    >>>>> colleague's Sony digital recorder whose results even in LP were very
    >>>>> clear.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If I could remove some of that "hiss" or noise that comes from a
    >>>>> large, cavernous lecture hall and somehow enhance the speaker's
    >>>>> voice, that would be of enormous help.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any tips to this regard greatly appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>>I could easily do it in Sound Forge. GW should be similar enough to
    >>>>have a noise removal filter. I looked at their web site and there are
    >>>>tools built into GW to analyze and filter noises. Also present are
    >>>>enhancement tools. Your best bet is to experiment with a copy of the
    >>>>audio file. Maybe GW has real time previews like Sound Forge. That way
    >>>>you can test different filters before committing to changes.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks. I gave this a try. I found it so far not worth the bother,
    >>> since the original voice recorder is wma and small and the result in
    >>> MP3 was very large in comparison. When I tried re-encoding down to a
    >>> lower bitrate to get a more reasonable MP3 file size, the quality was
    >>> just as bad in the new MP3 where I supposedly reduced the noise.
    >>>
    >>> Not sure what to do next.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the great tip, though. I'll keep hunting around to see if
    >>> there are other solutions.

    >>
    >>If you get as much noise out as you can and EQ it for vocals GW should
    >>have a default or dedicated vocal processing set of tools, the file size
    >>should not be gigantic. Encoding the MP3 for say 22khz @ a variable bit
    >>rate around 48KB/s should not degrade the output. Like I said I have
    >>been at this for about 14 years and have multi track gear and software
    >>here at home so audio production and restoration is a piece of cake for
    >>me. I make some extra money restoring old recordings off tape and vinyl.

    >
    > Wow, that's awesome! Thanks. I knew it had to be because I'm new at
    > this type of thing. Oh, I've been messing around with MP3
    > encoding/re-encoding for years but I've not actually gone in and had to
    > do anything this complex (not complicated, but complex). Lack of
    > experience, only.
    >
    > I'll try again. There were some recordings I made that I'd then be able
    > to use daily, so it's worth the trouble.
    >
    > Thanks. :eek:D


    Hey no prob. Do yourself a favor and copy and paste just a section of the
    file you are working on so you don't have a giant amount of data to play
    with while you are trying to figure out what filters to use. You can even
    chain filters together in GW once you've messed with it enough. Then
    apply that chain to a section of the file you've copied and pasted into a
    new file/project. Once you are satisfied then apply it to the working copy
    of the file (never work with the original) and you should be good to go.
    Once you de-noised and EQ'd to satisfaction then wrap it up into an MP3
    container.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 1, 2010
    #3
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