Re: Excessive wording in questions

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by Keith Chilton, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. Sometimes if I see a question is going to take quite a while to get to
    because the scenario is really long, I just look at the question
    immediately. Then I go back to reading the scenario and having read the
    question already I know what they are looking for so I filter out the
    scenario based on the question at the end. I know whats important already
    having read the question beforehand.

    Would that maybe help you? Then again you either know the material or you
    dont. Excess information shouldn't bother you if you know the answer to the
    question at the end.


    "mmariecrys" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello. Any recommendatins for cutting throught the filler and getting down
    > to
    > the meat of the test question? Reading every single word in the scenario
    > including the name of the company, full name of clients, number of
    > computers
    > on LAN, as well as entire words continuously being spelled out instead of
    > using well-know acronymns (Pro, DST, BIOS), takes up so much time, yet I
    > feel
    > like I will miss a key clue if the question is not read thoroughly. Then I
    > get down to the end of the question and realize that the first 5 sentences
    > were totally unnecessary.
    >
    > I guess the objective reviews and practice test questions (MS Press
    > Toolkit)
    > are providing good examples of what unnecessary wording to expect, but is
    > there a way to save time with reading questions? Like maybe starting from
    > the
    > last sentence to get the main question, then referring to the rest of the
    > question for required info?
    >
    > Thanks for any advice.
     
    Keith Chilton, Dec 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Being a technical instructor, I am suppose to tell you to read the
    questions in their entirety. Now with that said, I normally skip the
    first paragraph. :) I have taken sooo many exams with Microsoft over
    the years that it has not hurt me at all. It seems the first paragraph
    always deal with role playing. If I find myself not really understand
    what they are asking, I will review the question in its entirety.

    Do I recommend this method to others? No. I am comfortable with this
    method and my test taking abilities; and what works for me may not apply
    to you.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    CIW Certified Instructor



    "Keith Chilton" <> wrote in message
    news:eK5k#:

    > Sometimes if I see a question is going to take quite a while to get to
    > because the scenario is really long, I just look at the question
    > immediately. Then I go back to reading the scenario and having read the
    > question already I know what they are looking for so I filter out the
    > scenario based on the question at the end. I know whats important already
    > having read the question beforehand.
    >
    > Would that maybe help you? Then again you either know the material or you
    > dont. Excess information shouldn't bother you if you know the answer to the
    > question at the end.
    >
    >
    > "mmariecrys" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hello. Any recommendatins for cutting throught the filler and getting down
    > > to
    > > the meat of the test question? Reading every single word in the scenario
    > > including the name of the company, full name of clients, number of
    > > computers
    > > on LAN, as well as entire words continuously being spelled out instead of
    > > using well-know acronymns (Pro, DST, BIOS), takes up so much time, yet I
    > > feel
    > > like I will miss a key clue if the question is not read thoroughly. Then I
    > > get down to the end of the question and realize that the first 5 sentences
    > > were totally unnecessary.
    > >
    > > I guess the objective reviews and practice test questions (MS Press
    > > Toolkit)
    > > are providing good examples of what unnecessary wording to expect, but is
    > > there a way to save time with reading questions? Like maybe starting from
    > > the
    > > last sentence to get the main question, then referring to the rest of the
    > > question for required info?
    > >
    > > Thanks for any advice.
     
    Michael D. Alligood, Dec 11, 2006
    #2
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