Re: EMI Protected Audio Disks..

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Antoine Arnauld, Aug 18, 2003.

  1. Robert Mathews allegedly said:

    >
    >
    >
    > Seems to me its wise to avoid all EMI CD's, we have now 3 Players that
    > cant play the Norah Jones CD, 2 Panasonic and one NAD..
    >
    > Here is some thing of interest , that even modern players can't play these
    > protected CD's.


    Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the Line-in on a
    computer and make WAV files......which you them convert to MP3's?
    Antoine Arnauld, Aug 18, 2003
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 22:35:55 +1200, Antoine Arnauld <>
    wrote:

    >Robert Mathews allegedly said:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Seems to me its wise to avoid all EMI CD's, we have now 3 Players that
    >> cant play the Norah Jones CD, 2 Panasonic and one NAD..
    >>
    >> Here is some thing of interest , that even modern players can't play these
    >> protected CD's.

    >
    >Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the Line-in on a
    >computer and make WAV files......which you them convert to MP3's?




    Who wants a Analog copy, any way these CD should play on any equipments..
    Robert Mathews, Aug 18, 2003
    #2
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  3. On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 22:53:45 +1200, "k y l e" <> wrote:

    >"Antoine Arnauld" <> wrote in message
    >news:f_10b.12255$...
    >> Robert Mathews allegedly said:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Seems to me its wise to avoid all EMI CD's, we have now 3 Players that
    >> > cant play the Norah Jones CD, 2 Panasonic and one NAD..
    >> >
    >> > Here is some thing of interest , that even modern players can't play

    >these
    >> > protected CD's.

    >>
    >> Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the Line-in on

    >a
    >> computer and make WAV files......which you them convert to MP3's?

    >
    >Yeah that sure addresses the wider issue here. :-/
    >




    What and send EMI the bill for doing this..?
    Robert Mathews, Aug 18, 2003
    #3
  4. Antoine Arnauld

    k y l e Guest

    "Antoine Arnauld" <> wrote in message
    news:f_10b.12255$...
    > Robert Mathews allegedly said:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Seems to me its wise to avoid all EMI CD's, we have now 3 Players that
    > > cant play the Norah Jones CD, 2 Panasonic and one NAD..
    > >
    > > Here is some thing of interest , that even modern players can't play

    these
    > > protected CD's.

    >
    > Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the Line-in on

    a
    > computer and make WAV files......which you them convert to MP3's?


    Yeah that sure addresses the wider issue here. :-/
    k y l e, Aug 18, 2003
    #4
  5. T.N.O wrote:
    > "Antoine Arnauld" wrote
    >> Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the
    >> Line-in on a computer and make WAV files......which you them convert
    >> to MP3's?

    >
    > yes you can, but it *usually* makes crap quality MP3s.
    >
    > A friend of mine(yes I have one or two) did this with a record
    > collection, was kinda cool to have some really old music on the PC.


    My dad did this to some of his old records, then just downloaded the rest of
    the 'net. Easier and better quality. It's amazing how many old songs are on
    Kazaa.

    Cheers,
    Nicholas Sherlock
    Nicholas Sherlock, Aug 18, 2003
    #5
  6. Antoine Arnauld

    rj Guest

    In article <f_10b.12255$>,
    says...
    >
    >Robert Mathews allegedly said:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Seems to me its wise to avoid all EMI CD's, we have now 3 Players that
    >> cant play the Norah Jones CD, 2 Panasonic and one NAD..
    >>
    >> Here is some thing of interest , that even modern players can't play these
    >> protected CD's.

    >
    >Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the Line-in on a
    >computer and make WAV files......which you them convert to MP3's?


    Or just use freerip or similar to rip them to WAV, then burn an audio CD.
    rj, Aug 19, 2003
    #6
  7. Nicholas Sherlock allegedly said:

    > T.N.O wrote:
    >> "Antoine Arnauld" wrote
    >>> Can you not just connect a stereo that does play this CD to the
    >>> Line-in on a computer and make WAV files......which you them convert
    >>> to MP3's?

    >>
    >> yes you can, but it *usually* makes crap quality MP3s.
    >>
    >> A friend of mine(yes I have one or two) did this with a record
    >> collection, was kinda cool to have some really old music on the PC.

    >
    > My dad did this to some of his old records, then just downloaded the rest
    > of the 'net. Easier and better quality. It's amazing how many old songs
    > are on Kazaa.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Nicholas Sherlock


    Anything over 50 years old may well be legal. NZ copyright limit is 50
    years.

    Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain very soon
    now.
    Antoine Arnauld, Aug 19, 2003
    #7
  8. Antoine Arnauld

    Howard Guest

    Antoine Arnauld wrote:

    > Anything over 50 years old may well be legal. NZ copyright limit is
    > 50 years.
    >
    > Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain very
    > soon now.


    I wonder if this means kiwis can repackage the early mickey mouse cartoons
    and sell them on the internet to all comers, even yanks where they're still
    under copyright?
    Howard, Aug 19, 2003
    #8
  9. Antoine Arnauld

    M Guest

    "Uncle StoatWarbler" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 18:50:01 +1200, Howard wrote:
    >
    > > Antoine Arnauld wrote:
    > >
    > >> Anything over 50 years old may well be legal. NZ copyright limit is
    > >> 50 years.
    > >>
    > >> Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain very
    > >> soon now.

    > >
    > > I wonder if this means kiwis can repackage the early mickey mouse

    cartoons
    > > and sell them on the internet to all comers, even yanks where they're

    still
    > > under copyright?

    >
    > Uh. that's 50 years after the death of the author, not from production.
    >
    > IIRC the NZ govt is under pressure to alter copyright in line with the
    > Mickey Mouse law



    Not so.

    Copyright Act 1994

    23.Duration of copyright in sound recordings and films-
    (1)Copyright in a sound recording or film expires-
    (a)At the end of the period of 50 years from the end of the calendar
    year in which the work is made; or
    (b)If it is made available to the public by an authorised act before
    the end of that period, 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which
    it is so made available, whichever is the later.
    (2)For the purposes of subsection (1) of this section, a sound recording
    or film is made available to the public when-
    (a)The work is first-
    (i)Published; or
    (ii)Broadcast; or
    (iii)Included in a cable programme service; or
    (b)In the case of a film or film sound track,-
    (i)The work is first shown in public; or
    (ii)The work is first played in public.
    M, Aug 19, 2003
    #9
  10. On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 18:50:01 +1200, Howard wrote:

    > Antoine Arnauld wrote:
    >
    >> Anything over 50 years old may well be legal. NZ copyright limit is
    >> 50 years.
    >>
    >> Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain very
    >> soon now.

    >
    > I wonder if this means kiwis can repackage the early mickey mouse cartoons
    > and sell them on the internet to all comers, even yanks where they're still
    > under copyright?


    Uh. that's 50 years after the death of the author, not from production.

    IIRC the NZ govt is under pressure to alter copyright in line with the
    Mickey Mouse law
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Aug 19, 2003
    #10
  11. Antoine Arnauld

    M Guest

    "Uncle StoatWarbler" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:27:47 +0200, Philip Crookes wrote:
    >
    > >> > >> Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain

    very
    > >> > >> soon now.

    >
    > >> > Uh. that's 50 years after the death of the author, not from

    production.
    > >> >
    > >> > IIRC the NZ govt is under pressure to alter copyright in line with

    the
    > >> > Mickey Mouse law

    >
    > >> 23.Duration of copyright in sound recordings and films-
    > >> (1)Copyright in a sound recording or film expires-
    > >> (a)At the end of the period of 50 years from the end of the

    > > calendar
    > >> year in which the work is made; or

    >
    > That's the recording itself, there's still the author's copyright to be
    > aware of.


    Is that right.

    Reference ?
    M, Aug 20, 2003
    #11
  12. Antoine Arnauld

    Mutley Guest

    Didn't Disney apply to get Mickey products copy right extended to
    something like 80 years recently?? No doubt will try for 200 years
    when that expires..

    >> >
    >> > I wonder if this means kiwis can repackage the early mickey mouse

    >cartoons
    >> > and sell them on the internet to all comers, even yanks where they're

    >still
    >> > under copyright?

    >>
    >> Uh. that's 50 years after the death of the author, not from production.
    >>
    >> IIRC the NZ govt is under pressure to alter copyright in line with the
    >> Mickey Mouse law

    >
    >
    >Not so.
    >
    >Copyright Act 1994
    >
    >23.Duration of copyright in sound recordings and films-
    > (1)Copyright in a sound recording or film expires-
    > (a)At the end of the period of 50 years from the end of the calendar
    >year in which the work is made; or
    > (b)If it is made available to the public by an authorised act before
    >the end of that period, 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which
    >it is so made available, whichever is the later.
    > (2)For the purposes of subsection (1) of this section, a sound recording
    >or film is made available to the public when-
    > (a)The work is first-
    > (i)Published; or
    > (ii)Broadcast; or
    > (iii)Included in a cable programme service; or
    > (b)In the case of a film or film sound track,-
    > (i)The work is first shown in public; or
    > (ii)The work is first played in public.
    >
    Mutley, Aug 20, 2003
    #12
  13. Antoine Arnauld

    Mutley Guest

    "Philip Crookes" <> wrote:



    >>

    >So why do DVDs of classic flix so often come with the dire region codes on
    >them? Mind you there is an issue with classic movies - if there's no
    >copyright in the classics, who is going to maintain the negatives and make
    >certain there are high quality prints for the future?
    >

    Regional coding was a marketing ploy to screw even more money out the
    buyer..


    >Perhaps we should after all support Turner's 'colorization' process -
    >because at least to issue a 'colorized' version of the movie they first have
    >to strike a brand new print of it, which might otherwise never have been
    >made. And it's not that difficult to lose the colour information and restore
    >a presentable black-and-white version. Now all we need is a medium with the
    >same qualities as nitrate film, but without the tendency to deliquesce into
    >TNT.
    >
    >Philip
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Mutley, Aug 20, 2003
    #13
  14. Antoine Arnauld

    Mutley Guest

    "Uncle StoatWarbler" <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:27:47 +0200, Philip Crookes wrote:
    >
    >>> > >> Elvis' earliest songs should be passing into the public domain very
    >>> > >> soon now.

    >
    >>> > Uh. that's 50 years after the death of the author, not from production.
    >>> >
    >>> > IIRC the NZ govt is under pressure to alter copyright in line with the
    >>> > Mickey Mouse law

    >
    >>> 23.Duration of copyright in sound recordings and films-
    >>> (1)Copyright in a sound recording or film expires-
    >>> (a)At the end of the period of 50 years from the end of the

    >> calendar
    >>> year in which the work is made; or

    >
    >That's the recording itself, there's still the author's copyright to be
    >aware of.
    >
    >> So why do DVDs of classic flix so often come with the dire region codes on
    >> them?

    >
    >Because the MPAA, who control DVD codes, mandate that all DVDs must be
    >region coded. There are some region 0 disks, but they're not common -
    >manga and suchlike mainly. ISTR the BBC tried region 0 to ease their
    >distribution issues and got stomped on.
    >
    >
    >

    Close. The MPA said that they would not release any of their product
    on DVD unless some form of regional coding was implemented. It was
    only supposed to go on new release products but greedy Hollywood
    insisted on putting it on a their DVDs. Some older DVDs are R0 coded.

    I suspect regional coding is something that is put on buy commercial
    DVD authoring programs because the home versions don't have that
    feature..
    Mutley, Aug 20, 2003
    #14
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