Re: electricity saver device

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by greg, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. greg

    greg Guest

    wrote:
    > http://plugandsave.com/
    > Do these things really work ?



    Simple answer....no

    Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.
     
    greg, Jul 14, 2009
    #1
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  2. greg

    thingy Guest

    On Jul 14, 5:11 pm, greg <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > >http://plugandsave.com/
    > > Do these things really work ?

    >
    > Simple answer....no


    no...waste of money....

    > Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    > effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    > compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.


    Also it would depend on the load type if its power factor correction
    then ....electric heating, cooking is power factor 1.0 so no saving at
    all as 1.0 is "ideal" already....in fact this device will consume
    energy. If you have a lot of flourescent bulbs or electric motors it
    makes sense.....most domestic wont....newer bulbs probably have
    correction built in anyway...It talks about spikes, but most
    mechanical meters are not going to register something so
    transient...so you wont get billed for it....and then finally NZ has
    good quality power...the US and India have poor quality supplies in
    comparison...saving 30% is a crock IMHO....

    If you want to save look at your meter and then go switch off and
    unplug "stuff" you are not using, that will save you money (surround
    sound systems are very bad)....ever picked up your phone charger and
    felt it warm? lots of those little chargers add up.

    When I did it I unplugged evrything incl fridges until the meter
    stopped spinning I saved almost 3amps....3 x 230volts = 690watts at
    20cents a 1000w....thats $3 a day saved....of course I had to plus
    some staff back in....being lazy costs you....switch off at the wall,
    when you have finished..

    regards
     
    thingy, Jul 14, 2009
    #2
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  3. On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 14:29:10 -0700 (PDT), thingy
    <> wrote:

    >On Jul 14, 5:11 pm, greg <> wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >> >http://plugandsave.com/
    >> > Do these things really work ?

    >>
    >> Simple answer....no

    >
    >no...waste of money....


    Agreed

    >> Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    >> effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    >> compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.

    >
    >Also it would depend on the load type if its power factor correction
    >then ....electric heating, cooking is power factor 1.0 so no saving at
    >all as 1.0 is "ideal" already....in fact this device will consume
    >energy. If you have a lot of flourescent bulbs or electric motors it
    >makes sense.....most domestic wont....newer bulbs probably have
    >correction built in anyway...


    In a domestic situation power factor is irrelevant, the power meter
    only measures watts. You could carefully correct all your appliances
    to unity power factor and it would make no difference to your power
    bill. On industrial scale installations the power companies usually do
    charge a penalty for poor pf.

    >It talks about spikes, but most
    >mechanical meters are not going to register something so
    >transient...so you wont get billed for it....and then finally NZ has
    >good quality power...the US and India have poor quality supplies in
    >comparison...saving 30% is a crock IMHO....
    >
    >If you want to save look at your meter and then go switch off and
    >unplug "stuff" you are not using, that will save you money (surround
    >sound systems are very bad)....ever picked up your phone charger and
    >felt it warm? lots of those little chargers add up.
    >
    >When I did it I unplugged evrything incl fridges until the meter
    >stopped spinning I saved almost 3amps....3 x 230volts = 690watts at
    >20cents a 1000w....thats $3 a day saved....of course I had to plus
    >some staff back in....being lazy costs you....switch off at the wall,
    >when you have finished..
    >
    >regards

    --
    Regards
    Malcolm
    Remove sharp objects to get a valid e-mail address
     
    Malcolm Moore, Jul 14, 2009
    #3
  4. greg

    peterwn Guest

    On Jul 14, 5:11 pm, greg <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > >http://plugandsave.com/
    > > Do these things really work ?

    >
    > Simple answer....no
    >
    > Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    > effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    > compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.


    These devices can fool traditional disk meters into under registering
    by 'swamping' the meter with 'leading' reactive current. IMO their
    use is unlawful as they serve no other purpose than facilitate the
    theft of electricity.
     
    peterwn, Jul 15, 2009
    #4
  5. greg

    Richard Guest

    peterwn wrote:
    > On Jul 14, 5:11 pm, greg <> wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >>> http://plugandsave.com/
    >>> Do these things really work ?

    >> Simple answer....no
    >>
    >> Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    >> effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    >> compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.

    >
    > These devices can fool traditional disk meters into under registering
    > by 'swamping' the meter with 'leading' reactive current. IMO their
    > use is unlawful as they serve no other purpose than facilitate the
    > theft of electricity.


    Perhaps thats why there is a push for the newer electronic meters to be
    installed.

    I know that there was something I read a while back about magnetic disc
    meters underregistering non sinusoidal current waveforms when they were
    excessivly peaky like SMPS - I am dreading having mine changed since I
    have about 500 watts according to the inaccurate elto meter running all
    the time on switchmode supplies...
     
    Richard, Jul 15, 2009
    #5
  6. greg

    thingy Guest

    On Jul 15, 10:40 am, Malcolm Moore <>
    wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 14:29:10 -0700 (PDT), thingy
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On Jul 14, 5:11 pm, greg <> wrote:
    > >> wrote:
    > >> >http://plugandsave.com/
    > >> > Do these things really work ?

    >
    > >> Simple answer....no

    >
    > >no...waste of money....

    >
    > Agreed
    >
    > >> Looking at the website, it uses a "capacitor system", which have an
    > >> effect on power factor, domestic metering does no include any
    > >> compensation for power factor, so it won't save you any money.

    >
    > >Also it would depend on the load type if its power factor correction
    > >then ....electric heating, cooking is power factor 1.0 so no saving at
    > >all as 1.0 is "ideal" already....in fact this device  will consume
    > >energy. If you have a lot of flourescent bulbs or electric motors it
    > >makes sense.....most domestic wont....newer bulbs probably have
    > >correction built in anyway...

    >
    > In a domestic situation power factor is irrelevant, the power meter
    > only measures watts. You could carefully correct all your appliances
    > to unity power factor and it would make no difference to your power
    > bill. On industrial scale installations the power companies usually do
    > charge a penalty for poor pf.


    Yes, that is implicit....however, I wonder how these new "smart"
    meters work....if they are bright enough there is no reason that they
    could not start to account for PF....and peaks...
    A change in conditions from your energy company and oops your bill is
    magically bigger....

    As I said, most domestic load is going to be PF 1.0 anyway, but the
    ability to charge each customer a few more dollars adds up to
    substantial revenue for virtually no outlay, in which case these units
    start to make sense for the energy company........but of course we are
    taking maybe $10~$15 worth of capacitors....do it while the "fancy"
    meter is put in....

    regards
     
    thingy, Jul 15, 2009
    #6
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