Re: Editing with two screens - (was Re: Has your memory card everworn out?)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Whisky-dave, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Whisky-dave

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Thursday, August 2, 2012 1:24:55 PM UTC+1, David Ruether wrote:
    > "Eric Stevens" <> wrote in message news:
    >
    > :
    >
    > > On Wed, 01 Aug 2012 23:39:50 -0400, nospam <>

    >
    > > wrote:

    >
    > > >In article <>, Eric Stevens

    >
    > > ><> wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > > >> I have been considering going to two screens but I am scratching

    >
    > > >> myhead over how I should choose the second. Should it be the same type

    >
    > > >> as the first?

    >
    >
    >
    > > >that's a good idea if you aren't going to calibrate them, since they'll

    >
    > > >both look the same. if you do calibrate, it doesn't matter because once

    >
    > > >you do calibrate them, they'll match.

    >
    >
    >
    > > THey will be calibrated alright but even then, if they are two

    >
    > > different types of screens viewed from two different angles they are

    >
    > > not going to look the same.

    >
    >
    >
    > They will if you look directly on-axis of both and they are
    >
    > calibrated (BUT, LCD screens may vary top-to-bottom in brightness,
    >
    > something to be aware of when judging image overall brightness - and
    >
    > often it is necessary to either view a photo small to evaluate overall
    >
    > brightness, or to scroll them, or to move yourself up and down to
    >
    > correct for this characteristic [one advantage of using CRTs, but
    >
    > I still prefer LCDs for their better sharpness]). BTW, I have two
    >
    > 24" 1920x1200 monitors of the same brand and they reverse in
    >
    > brightness variation: one is brighter at the top; the other at the
    >
    > bottom...


    I know you've said the screen brighness top-bottem is different but I'm wondering if it's the screen or the backlights, niot that it makes a differnce to the user. On my Aple 17" the top backlight either failed or just went dim.
    Then a week or two later started working fine again.

    One thing I've noticed with LCD screens is that they do dim over time.
    A iMac that when first brought I kept at minium brightness (for general+ surfing)needs to be at full brightness about 3 1/2 years later.
    Not sure how LED or OLED screens compare.



    >
    >
    >
    > > That's why I was interested in Tony's

    >
    > > comment that he used the second screen to select colours from

    >
    > > palettes. Will the selected colour look the same on the other screen?

    >
    > > Or is it that Tony knows that the patch/swatch on the display is going

    >
    > > to give him the colour he wants, even if it looks different on the

    >
    > > second screen?

    >
    >
    >
    > Calibration solves this fairly well...;-)
    >
    >
    >
    > > >> Should it be the same size?

    >
    >
    >
    > > >they can be any size you want. some people like a large display for

    >
    > > >images and a smaller display for the tools. others prefer two similar

    >
    > > >sizes.

    >
    >
    >
    > It also depends on the primary uses. For video, a main screen of
    >
    > 1920x1200 is very useful, with the other at 1920x1080 for previewing
    >
    > at full resolution (but 1920x1200 screens also works fine for this);
    >
    > for photo work, the side screen may need to be the larger one for
    >
    > seeing the image at maximum resolution; for writing papers, dual
    >
    > screens of 1920x1200 are preferable to see the maximum on each
    >
    > page of material...
    >


    Agreed, I rarely use a second monitor on my 24" imac and when I do it's a cheap 15" that is set up purley to adjust sliders rather than look at the photo/image, and I haven't as much space as I'd like to have a larger monitor.
    I've heard you can use an iPad OR iPod as a Second monitor, not tried it myslef.

    >
    > > That's what I'm getting at Tony has two different sizes and seems to

    >
    > > be happy with them. What do other people think of this aspect of the

    >
    > > question.

    >
    >
    >
    > More useful is having two identical screens of at least 1920x*1200*
    >
    > resolution for a variety of purposes...
    >
    >
    >
    > > > maybe you can't afford two large displays so you get one big and

    >
    > > >one small. or maybe you can, so you get two large displays, or maybe

    >
    > > >more than two. it's totally up to you (and the capabilities of your

    >
    > > >hardware).

    >
    >
    >
    > > In this matter I'm looking for the guidance: the opinions of others.

    >
    >
    >
    > See above...;-)
    >
    >
    >
    > > >and why stop at two...

    >
    > > >www.schrankmonster.de/content/binary/WindowsLiveWriter/whynottake13displaysand_11AF9/Dsc00065[3].jpg

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Regards,

    >
    > > Eric Stevens

    >
    >
    >
    > --DR
    Whisky-dave, Aug 2, 2012
    #1
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  2. Whisky-dave

    nospam Guest

    Re: Editing with two screens - (was Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?)

    In article <>,
    Whisky-dave <> wrote:

    > One thing I've noticed with LCD screens is that they do dim over time.


    a lot less than a crt will.
    nospam, Aug 2, 2012
    #2
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  3. nospam <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Whisky-dave <> wrote:


    >> One thing I've noticed with LCD screens is that they do dim over time.


    > a lot less than a crt will.


    That very much depends on the details of the LCD lighting system.
    You are aware there are different technologies?

    -Wolfgang
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Aug 5, 2012
    #3
  4. Whisky-dave

    nospam Guest

    Re: Editing with two screens - (was Re: Has your memory card ever worn out?)

    In article <>, Wolfgang
    Weisselberg <> wrote:

    > >> One thing I've noticed with LCD screens is that they do dim over time.

    >
    > > a lot less than a crt will.

    >
    > That very much depends on the details of the LCD lighting system.
    > You are aware there are different technologies?


    obviously, if you have a crappy lcd versus a top of the line crt, the
    crt will have advantages.

    normal people compare like versus like, not intentionally slanting it
    to get results they want.
    nospam, Aug 6, 2012
    #4
  5. nospam <> wrote:
    > In article <>, Wolfgang
    > Weisselberg <> wrote:


    >> >> One thing I've noticed with LCD screens is that they do dim over time.


    >> > a lot less than a crt will.


    >> That very much depends on the details of the LCD lighting system.
    >> You are aware there are different technologies?


    > obviously, if you have a crappy lcd versus a top of the line crt, the
    > crt will have advantages.


    > normal people compare like versus like, not intentionally slanting it
    > to get results they want.


    And why then are you comparing unlike to unlike, like CRTs to LCDs?

    -Wolfgang
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Aug 7, 2012
    #5
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