Re: DSLRs with inbuilt GPS

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by MC, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. MC

    MC Guest

    Alfred Molon wrote:

    > Is there any specific reason why only one DLSR (the Sony A55)
    > currently has inbuilt GPS, while several compacts have inbuilt GPS?


    Maybe because many still see it as just a gimmick.

    MC
     
    MC, Feb 8, 2011
    #1
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  2. MC

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 8 Feb 2011 11:26:03 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2011-02-08 10:42:08 -0800, "MC" <> said:
    >
    >> Alfred Molon wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there any specific reason why only one DLSR (the Sony A55)
    >>> currently has inbuilt GPS, while several compacts have inbuilt GPS?

    >>
    >> Maybe because many still see it as just a gimmick.
    >>
    >> MC

    >
    >A gimmick it is not.
    >For those who want, or have come to need it for whatever purpose, GPS
    >is another useful tool available to the digital photographer.


    A "gimmick" is a feature that you, personally, don't feel is
    necessary. To me, an onboard camera GPS would be a gimmick. It's all
    about what you personally feel would be useful.

    One of cars I own has some sort of input for an MP3 player. I don't
    own an MP3 player, I don't have any interest in getting one, and I
    feel that the input device is a gimmick. If I sell that car, the
    person who buys it might feel that the input device is a required
    accessory.

    When they first came out, I thought those Garmin (and other brand)
    gadgets were gimmicks. Then, my son got one, I used it, and owning
    one became a necessity. I use mine quite a bit now.

    In short, a "gimmick" is something you don't want or think you'll
    need. It is not inherently a gimmick because it's all about
    perception.

    I just succumbed to another gimmick: a flat-screen HD wall-mounted
    television. Yesterday's gimmick is today's "Why didn't I do this
    sooner?".


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 8, 2011
    #2
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  3. MC

    Peter N Guest

    On 2/9/2011 4:03 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > In article<2011020823321916807-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>, Savageduck
    > says...
    >>>> If you need the flash shoe you can move the GP-1 unit to the provided
    >>>> neck strap clip, and it still acquires fixes without issue.
    >>>
    >>> But then it does not write the GPS data to the exif.

    >>
    >> Sure it does, who told you it didn't?

    >
    > How can the unit write the data to the exit when it is not connected to
    > the camera?
    >
    >> The GP-1 connects to the D200, D300s, D700, D3(?) via the 10-pin
    >> connector, and the D90 and newer DSLR's via mini USB to a dedicated GSP
    >> port.

    >
    > Oh... there is an additional cable? I thought it was exchanging the data
    > through the hot shoe. Then it's a very bulky arrangement.



    Since you are obviously stretching to find objections, don't get one.
    Yes it's a toy, but I like toys. That's why we have voice control and
    remote starting in our new car.


    --
    Peter
     
    Peter N, Feb 10, 2011
    #3
  4. MC

    Peter N Guest

    On 2/10/2011 1:55 PM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > In article<4d53f131$0$5635$-secrets.com>, Peter N
    > says...
    >
    >> Since you are obviously stretching to find objections, don't get one.
    >> Yes it's a toy, but I like toys. That's why we have voice control and
    >> remote starting in our new car.

    >
    > Nope, but what is obvious is that you are taking on a poster without
    > adding anything relevant to this thread.


    And your informed positive contribution is.......?

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter N, Feb 10, 2011
    #4
  5. Alfred Molon <> wrote:

    > Since nowadays most smartphones have GPS it's a bit strange that DSLRs
    > do not have it (except for the A55). It can be turned off if power
    > comsumption is a concern.


    Since nowadays most smartphones can do phone calls, ...

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Feb 12, 2011
    #5
  6. MC

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:11:05 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2011.02.08 15:05 , tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> I just succumbed to another gimmick: a flat-screen HD wall-mounted
    >> television. Yesterday's gimmick is today's "Why didn't I do this
    >> sooner?".

    >
    >If you ever take an interest in locating your photos geographically (any
    >traveler should see the utility in this), then using a GPS to record
    >positions and time is a non-brainer. Having the GPS in the camera to
    >tag the photos when taken is a later time saver.


    That depends on the subject matter. I don't take landscape photos.
    There's nothing about the Florida landscape that I find
    photographable. If there is a scene that is even somewhat
    photographable, I'd certainly remember where it was.

    I take a lot of candid people shots. Where they were when the
    photograph was taken doesn't help me find them later. I do take some
    shots of old buildings, old cars, and other interesting - to me -
    found objects. I have a pretty good memory of where the shots were
    taken. I also do some table-top photography in my garage, and I
    remember where that is.

    There are times that I almost wish my camera recorded the location. A
    while back I shot some street art in Miami*, and a friend wanted to
    know where this area was. I stumbled on it, so I couldn't really
    direct him. I did remember the general area.

    If I really wanted to retain a location for a specific photo, the
    Garmin in my car provides GPS information but I'd have to write down
    the coordinates. I don't do wildlife photos, so I'm never far from my
    car.

    One of the reasons I like the Shoot-In is that my natural interests in
    subject matter are rather limited. The Shoot-In sometimes makes me
    think out of the box.

    My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.

    *
    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Spray-Can-Art/14787279_GXQ63#P-2-16




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 12, 2011
    #6
  7. MC

    Peter N Guest

    On 2/12/2011 5:40 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-02-12 14:11:05 -0800, Alan Browne
    > <> said:
    >
    >> On 2011.02.08 15:05 , tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>> I just succumbed to another gimmick: a flat-screen HD wall-mounted
    >>> television. Yesterday's gimmick is today's "Why didn't I do this
    >>> sooner?".

    >>
    >> If you ever take an interest in locating your photos geographically
    >> (any traveler should see the utility in this), then using a GPS to
    >> record positions and time is a non-brainer. Having the GPS in the
    >> camera to tag the photos when taken is a later time saver.
    >>
    >> In Colorado I took a photo and I had a lot of interest a couple years
    >> later in knowing precisely where I took it. Alas I was not recording
    >> the GPS data from which I could get that (even reading the basic GPS
    >> output itself would have been enough.) But I was not recording on that
    >> part of that trip. Bummer. I can't find on GE where I took it (I know
    >> within about a 10 km circle).
    >>
    >> GPS together with photography is not only not a gimmick, it is a
    >> natural for almost ALL travel photography.
    >>
    >> I would add that it is even better if the camera has a compass in it
    >> to record the "heading" of the shot (mag var corrected for bonus points).

    >
    > I guess GPS is a tool both of us agree on. I have been more than happy
    > with the performance of the Nikon GP-1, though it is lacking the compass
    > heading feature, perhaps with an future upgrade.
    >
    > It is nice to know the location of a shot and the shooter's position.
    > This one from Laguna Seca for example. GPS data is onboard;
    > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/Lagonda V12-4619w.jpg >
    >


    That image is a good example of my statement on another thread. You have
    captured the concept oh high speed in a still image. That doesn't mean I
    don't have some some minor nits to pick. Will you sow it in the SI as a
    motor car?
    Peter
     
    Peter N, Feb 12, 2011
    #7
  8. MC

    Peter N Guest

    Peter N, Feb 12, 2011
    #8
  9. MC

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 12 Feb 2011 in rec.photo.digital, tony cooper wrote:

    > If I really wanted to retain a location for a specific photo, the
    > Garmin in my car provides GPS information but I'd have to write down
    > the coordinates. I don't do wildlife photos, so I'm never far from my
    > car.


    Actually, you don't. The Garmin produces GPX files, which you can get by
    plugging it into your computer. Then run the GPX file and the pictures
    into a program like Geosetter (http://www.geosetter.de/en), and assuming
    that your timestamps are somewhere near accurate, you can geotag the
    images.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
    Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    Joe Makowiec, Feb 13, 2011
    #9
  10. MC

    me Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2011 14:40:01 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:


    >> GPS together with photography is not only not a gimmick, it is a
    >> natural for almost ALL travel photography.
    >>
    >> I would add that it is even better if the camera has a compass in it to
    >> record the "heading" of the shot (mag var corrected for bonus points).

    >
    >I guess GPS is a tool both of us agree on. I have been more than happy
    >with the performance of the Nikon GP-1, though it is lacking the
    >compass heading feature, perhaps with an future upgrade.
    >
    >It is nice to know the location of a shot and the shooter's position.
    >This one from Laguna Seca for example. GPS data is onboard;
    >< http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/Lagonda V12-4619w.jpg >


    Except anyone who has ever been to Laguna Seca and walked up the hill
    surely can identify this spot, no? :)
     
    me, Feb 13, 2011
    #10
  11. MC

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2011 09:07:16 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2011.02.12 17:36 , tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    >> may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.

    >
    >And my point is that what you think of a gimmick now might seem very
    >useful to you one day - but that photos you're making now won't have
    >been tagged because of your current dis-interest.


    That is true, but - in my case - not with my current photographic
    interests. I have a large number of images that were taken in Europe
    and Africa on past trips. They are scans of prints and slides taken
    with film cameras.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 13, 2011
    #11
  12. MC

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 13 Feb 2011 12:15:08 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2011.02.13 10:27 , tony cooper wrote:
    >> On Sun, 13 Feb 2011 09:07:16 -0500, Alan Browne
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2011.02.12 17:36 , tony cooper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    >>>> may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.
    >>>
    >>> And my point is that what you think of a gimmick now might seem very
    >>> useful to you one day - but that photos you're making now won't have
    >>> been tagged because of your current dis-interest.

    >>
    >> That is true, but - in my case - not with my current photographic
    >> interests.

    >
    >What's the saying in the NY lottery? "Hey, you never know."
    >
    >>I have a large number of images that were taken in Europe
    >> and Africa on past trips. They are scans of prints and slides taken
    >> with film cameras.

    >
    >Which, as you probably know, can also be tagged with various tools, from
    >LC such as exiftool to others mentioned in this thread.


    To tag, you have to know where the image was taken. I don't know
    which game park those lions were in when I photographed them on film.
    Not that it makes a great deal of difference.
    >
    >Face it Tony, you're setting yourself up for a "I told you so." moment
    >in the future. ;-)


    We each allocate our disposable income to what we want. On-board GPS
    is a low priority for me, so my decision on what camera upgrade or
    accessories will be purchased next is going to be based on other
    factors. On-board GPS is not something I'd avoid, but it is something
    that the lack of would not be a deal-killer.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 13, 2011
    #12
  13. MC

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 13 Feb 2011 in rec.photo.digital, Alan Browne wrote:

    > Does he have to activate a recording or make "marks" to keep that
    > file in the Garmin's memory?


    No - the Garmin keeps it until you purge it. (It's what keeps those
    cyan-colored "you've been here" tracks that show up on the screen.

    > I set the time on my camera once per month with the computer system
    > clock (which in turn is updated from an NTP server near here). That
    > leaves the camera within 10 seconds for about 1 month.


    That should be close enough. The software will allow you to adjust by
    full time zones, so that even if you leave the camera on your home time
    zone, it will know to adjust the picture's time and get the location
    correct.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
    Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    Joe Makowiec, Feb 14, 2011
    #13
  14. MC

    Peter N Guest

    On 2/13/2011 12:19 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2011.02.12 18:15 , Peter N wrote:
    >> On 2/12/2011 5:36 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    >>> may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.
    >>>
    >>> *
    >>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Spray-Can-Art/14787279_GXQ63#P-2-16
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yup!
    >> My wife said an LED TV was a gimmick, until we got one. Now, guess which
    >> of us uses it the most.

    >
    > My SO doesn't seem to care when we watch some shows recorded on the
    > "analog" DVR or channels that we don't get in HD. (Canada is still mixed
    > mode, and oddly, we still get US stations on cable in both analog and HD).
    >
    > But she is contemplating a television for the living room (formerly
    > Alan's studio). Personally I don't believe in there being a television
    > in the living room. But then I didn't even know what a living room was
    > until she took over management here.
    >


    I now have a bigger problem. When I read the manual I realized that the
    TV could also be used as a monitor for my computer. I have now been
    accused of knowing this in advance, (I didn't,) and just wanting an
    excuse to get a larger computer screen. Had I known, the accusation
    would have been true. I need not go into further details.
    My strategy is to hook up her computer to her TV and wait for her
    reaction. She has a 19" and claims it is good enough. Therefore, I don't
    need anything larger than the 23" screen I have.


    --
    Peter
     
    Peter N, Feb 14, 2011
    #14
  15. MC

    John Turco Guest

    Peter N wrote:
    >
    > On 2/12/2011 5:36 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    > > may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.
    > >
    > > *
    > > http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Spray-Can-Art/14787279_GXQ63#P-2-16
    > >

    >
    > Yup!
    > My wife said an LED TV was a gimmick, until we got one. Now, guess
    > which of us uses it the most.



    A Samsung model of LED television set (still undetermined) is going to be
    our next TV purchase, someday. The ol' Sanyo "HT30744" is still nice, and
    yet its 30" "wide screen" CRT (made by Samsung) is both relatively small
    and quite bulky (as well as very heavy), by current standards.

    [It was obtained as a $477.70 display model, at a local Wal-Mart store,
    on April 21, 2005.)

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
    #15
  16. MC

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/27/2011 9:19 PM, John Turco wrote:
    > Peter N wrote:
    >>
    >> On 2/12/2011 5:36 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> My original point was what might be essential or very useful to you
    >>> may be a gimmick to me. And vice-versa.
    >>>
    >>> *
    >>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/Spray-Can-Art/14787279_GXQ63#P-2-16
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yup!
    >> My wife said an LED TV was a gimmick, until we got one. Now, guess
    >> which of us uses it the most.

    >
    >
    > A Samsung model of LED television set (still undetermined) is going to be
    > our next TV purchase, someday. The ol' Sanyo "HT30744" is still nice, and
    > yet its 30" "wide screen" CRT (made by Samsung) is both relatively small
    > and quite bulky (as well as very heavy), by current standards.
    >
    > [It was obtained as a $477.70 display model, at a local Wal-Mart store,
    > on April 21, 2005.)
    >


    We have an old Sony XBR. I am not certain of the year, but it is
    somewhere between 1985 and 1989. It was our main set for many years and
    just keeps going and going. When it finally goes, it will be replaced
    with a 40" LED. Both of us have mixed feelings. That old TV still has
    decent picture and audio quality, together with picture in picture and a
    host of features.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Mar 2, 2011
    #16
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