Re: Does linux support my new widescreen monitor

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by sully1999@gmail.com, Sep 23, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Linux should support it.

    Making it actually work is an entirely different kettle of fish.

    There is a reason why Newegg and other manufacturers don't bother
    certifying Linux to work
    with their hardware and that is the market for Linux is so small it
    isn't worth wasting the glue for the sticker on.

    Linux: When your time has no value.


    On Sep 22, 3:40 pm, "Judge Dredd" <> wrote:
    > I'm thinking of buying this widescreen from NewEgg
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009101
    >
    > The monitor is advertised as being "Windows Vista Certified" so it will
    > obviously work with Vista. But I'm concerned if it will work with linux
    > because it doesn't say anything about being "Linux Certified."
    >
    > Will linux be able to automatically use the 1920x1200 resolution or will
    > have need to tweak some config files to get the full resolution. I worry
    > about editing config files becase I don't type too good and if I make a
    > mistake I worry that I will have no video at all.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > - Scott -
    >
    > --
    > Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com
     
    , Sep 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. Stephan Rose Guest

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 06:32:00 -0700, sully1999 wrote:

    > Linux should support it.
    >
    > Making it actually work is an entirely different kettle of fish.


    Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the video
    card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an extremely
    difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power cord.

    >
    > There is a reason why Newegg and other manufacturers don't bother
    > certifying Linux to work
    > with their hardware and that is the market for Linux is so small it
    > isn't worth wasting the glue for the sticker on.
    >
    > Linux: When your time has no value.


    Vista: When you should be getting reimbursed for your time using it.

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Sep 23, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. wrote:

    > Linux: When your time has no value.


    : When you want to hear someone speak while
    simultaneously licking their own privates.
     
    Tattoo Vampire, Sep 23, 2007
    #3
  4. Tim Smith Guest

    In article <>,
    Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    > Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the video
    > card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an extremely
    > difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power cord.


    Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    many.


    --
    --Tim Smith
     
    Tim Smith, Sep 23, 2007
    #4
  5. Charlie Tame Guest

    Tim Smith wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the video
    >> card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an extremely
    >> difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power cord.

    >
    > Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    > many.
    >
    >



    Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    easier all the time.
     
    Charlie Tame, Sep 23, 2007
    #5
  6. Stephan Rose Guest

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 14:30:47 -0500, Charlie Tame wrote:

    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>> cord.

    >>
    >> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    >> many.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    > easier all the time.


    Matter of fact it's so easy that with the upcoming October Release, it
    has hot plug monitor and driver support. So you can change monitors all
    you want, drivers all you want, all on the fly without ever rebooting or
    even seeing a command line.

    Now try to change a driver under Vista without rebooting.

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Sep 23, 2007
    #6
  7. Charlie Tame Guest

    Stephan Rose wrote:
    > On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 14:30:47 -0500, Charlie Tame wrote:
    >
    >> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>> cord.
    >>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    >>> many.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    >> easier all the time.

    >
    > Matter of fact it's so easy that with the upcoming October Release, it
    > has hot plug monitor and driver support. So you can change monitors all
    > you want, drivers all you want, all on the fly without ever rebooting or
    > even seeing a command line.
    >
    > Now try to change a driver under Vista without rebooting.
    >


    Well I have to admit that a year or two back Linux was sadly lacking in
    friendliness, but it seems that the community has switched resources
    toward competing with "Windows" on this topic and preserving the
    existing security while MS has been forced to try and backwards engineer
    security into the "Easy" system. Actually UAC seems to me to be trying
    to "Emulate" the more GUI oriented Linux but for appearances only.

    I mean obviously a user with the PW can screw up Linux security if they
    want to, same applies to Vista, but WRT UAC I think there's more
    incentive to set about screwing it up.

    I take some of Dennis' points that Linux is not as secure as (Say) some
    military system, but hey, I'd expect military systems to be operated by
    trained people for specific purposes, not editing MP3s one minute and
    launching missiles the next, could give a whole new meaning to "All
    Shook Up" or "Bomb the Bass"...

    That said it is not Linux but the Unix philosophy or model on which it
    is based that is inherently better, and there is no blame attached to
    Microsoft for this per-se, much has changed since W95, however I do
    think maybe they would have done better to design a more isolated core
    than to continue this never ending "Integration" between Apps like IE
    and the OS itself.

    As for compatibility, well, I seen no real need for our server at work
    to look and feel like XP, but it does, as do all the rest of them.
    Having system updates brought in by a "Browser" for example seems
    counter intuitive when you think about it.
     
    Charlie Tame, Sep 23, 2007
    #7
  8. dennis@home Guest

    "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    news:u5Zj%23gh$...
    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>> cord.

    >>
    >> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    >> many.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    > easier all the time.


    Yes Ubuntu sets 1280x768 on my widescreen monitor automatically.
    Shame its a 1280 x 720 lcd panel.
    Just as well I can change it but I wonder how many newbies would fail?
    XP and Vista get it right BTW.
     
    dennis@home, Sep 23, 2007
    #8
  9. Charlie Tame Guest

    dennis@home wrote:
    >
    > "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    > news:u5Zj%23gh$...
    >> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>> cord.
    >>>
    >>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge
    >>> for many.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things
    >> get easier all the time.

    >
    > Yes Ubuntu sets 1280x768 on my widescreen monitor automatically.
    > Shame its a 1280 x 720 lcd panel.
    > Just as well I can change it but I wonder how many newbies would fail?
    > XP and Vista get it right BTW.



    Well maybe you should follow your own advice as offered to many here on
    occasions and blame the manufacturer for using a non standard
    resolution, or blame the user for not doing research into Ubuntu
    requirements before installing. These kinds of comments work both ways :)
     
    Charlie Tame, Sep 23, 2007
    #9
  10. dennis@home Guest

    "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    news:ejYHyYi$...
    > dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >> "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    >> news:u5Zj%23gh$...
    >>> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>>> cord.
    >>>>
    >>>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    >>>> many.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    >>> easier all the time.

    >>
    >> Yes Ubuntu sets 1280x768 on my widescreen monitor automatically.
    >> Shame its a 1280 x 720 lcd panel.
    >> Just as well I can change it but I wonder how many newbies would fail?
    >> XP and Vista get it right BTW.

    >
    >
    > Well maybe you should follow your own advice as offered to many here on
    > occasions and blame the manufacturer for using a non standard resolution,
    > or blame the user for not doing research into Ubuntu requirements before
    > installing.



    Don't be stupid 1280x720 is a standard format. It is one of the two HDTV
    formats.
    A user shouldn't really need to research to see if an OS supports a standard
    display mode.
    There are plenty of OSes that do support it out of the box including some
    Linux distros.

    > These kinds of comments work both ways :)


    Only if someone has a distorted view of the world.
     
    dennis@home, Sep 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Stephan Rose Guest

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 15:07:49 -0500, Charlie Tame wrote:

    > Stephan Rose wrote:
    >> On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 14:30:47 -0500, Charlie Tame wrote:
    >>
    >>> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>>> cord.
    >>>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge
    >>>> for many.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things
    >>> get easier all the time.

    >>
    >> Matter of fact it's so easy that with the upcoming October Release, it
    >> has hot plug monitor and driver support. So you can change monitors all
    >> you want, drivers all you want, all on the fly without ever rebooting
    >> or even seeing a command line.
    >>
    >> Now try to change a driver under Vista without rebooting.
    >>
    >>

    > Well I have to admit that a year or two back Linux was sadly lacking in
    > friendliness, but it seems that the community has switched resources
    > toward competing with "Windows" on this topic and preserving the
    > existing security while MS has been forced to try and backwards engineer
    > security into the "Easy" system. Actually UAC seems to me to be trying
    > to "Emulate" the more GUI oriented Linux but for appearances only.
    >
    > I mean obviously a user with the PW can screw up Linux security if they
    > want to, same applies to Vista, but WRT UAC I think there's more
    > incentive to set about screwing it up.
    >
    > I take some of Dennis' points that Linux is not as secure as (Say) some
    > military system, but hey, I'd expect military systems to be operated by
    > trained people for specific purposes, not editing MP3s one minute and
    > launching missiles the next, could give a whole new meaning to "All
    > Shook Up" or "Bomb the Bass"...


    Well nor does it need to be as secure as some military system. It's
    installed on frigging home computers for crying out loud...I think the
    whole security hype's going overboard.

    Any system that is modifiable by the user is inherently only as secure as
    the user using it. No amount of UAC popups or passwords can compete
    against a user that willingly installs malware.


    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Sep 23, 2007
    #11
  12. dennis@home Guest

    "Stephan Rose" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Any system that is modifiable by the user is inherently only as secure as
    > the user using it. No amount of UAC popups or passwords can compete
    > against a user that willingly installs malware.
    >


    Do you think you can explain that to alias?
    He thinks linux is secure.
     
    dennis@home, Sep 23, 2007
    #12
  13. Charlie Tame Guest

    dennis@home wrote:
    >
    > "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    > news:ejYHyYi$...
    >> dennis@home wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:u5Zj%23gh$...
    >>>> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of
    >>>>>> the video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor
    >>>>>> is an extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in
    >>>>>> the power cord.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge
    >>>>> for many.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things
    >>>> get easier all the time.
    >>>
    >>> Yes Ubuntu sets 1280x768 on my widescreen monitor automatically.
    >>> Shame its a 1280 x 720 lcd panel.
    >>> Just as well I can change it but I wonder how many newbies would fail?
    >>> XP and Vista get it right BTW.

    >>
    >>
    >> Well maybe you should follow your own advice as offered to many here
    >> on occasions and blame the manufacturer for using a non standard
    >> resolution, or blame the user for not doing research into Ubuntu
    >> requirements before installing.

    >
    >
    > Don't be stupid 1280x720 is a standard format. It is one of the two HDTV
    > formats.




    Where did I say it wasn't, read what I said again... you do read some of
    the fanboy's allegations about users I take it? No, maybe not.




    > A user shouldn't really need to research to see if an OS supports a
    > standard display mode.




    Then why are users constantly told here that many of their problems are
    due to their lack of research?



    > There are plenty of OSes that do support it out of the box including
    > some Linux distros.



    Please quote the part of my original post that suggests that Ubuntu is
    perfect. I said it is easier than most and getting easier, you have
    obviously decided to try and twist that around to build your straw man...



    >> These kinds of comments work both ways :)

    >
    > Only if someone has a distorted view of the world.



    Given your ability to distort a couple of sentences and reverse the
    meaning of what was in them I should think that's more your problem than
    mine...
     
    Charlie Tame, Sep 23, 2007
    #13
  14. Hadron Guest

    Charlie Tame <> writes:

    > Tim Smith wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>> cord.

    >>
    >> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge
    >> for many.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things
    > get easier all the time.



    But a quick visit to Google reveals all sorts of issues. Look up getting
    Beryl to work on Debian for example.

    For some "it just works".

    Fortunately the "advocates" here are not in charge of prioritising bug
    fixes. If so, we would all be tweaking the MBR and xorg.conf from now
    until eternity.


    --
    "BTW, does Jesus know you flame?"
    -- Diane Holt, , to Ed Carp
     
    Hadron, Sep 24, 2007
    #14
  15. Charlie Tame wrote:
    > Stephan Rose wrote:
    >> On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 14:30:47 -0500, Charlie Tame wrote:
    >>
    >>> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>>> cord.
    >>>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for
    >>>> many.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    >>> easier all the time.

    >>
    >> Matter of fact it's so easy that with the upcoming October Release, it
    >> has hot plug monitor and driver support. So you can change monitors
    >> all you want, drivers all you want, all on the fly without ever
    >> rebooting or even seeing a command line.
    >>
    >> Now try to change a driver under Vista without rebooting.
    >>

    >
    > Well I have to admit that a year or two back Linux was sadly lacking in
    > friendliness, but it seems that the community has switched resources
    > toward competing with "Windows" on this topic and preserving the
    > existing security while MS has been forced to try and backwards engineer
    > security into the "Easy" system. Actually UAC seems to me to be trying
    > to "Emulate" the more GUI oriented Linux but for appearances only.
    >
    > I mean obviously a user with the PW can screw up Linux security if they
    > want to, same applies to Vista, but WRT UAC I think there's more
    > incentive to set about screwing it up.
    >
    > I take some of Dennis' points that Linux is not as secure as (Say) some
    > military system, but hey, I'd expect military systems to be operated by
    > trained people for specific purposes, not editing MP3s one minute and
    > launching missiles the next, could give a whole new meaning to "All
    > Shook Up" or "Bomb the Bass"...
    >
    > That said it is not Linux but the Unix philosophy or model on which it
    > is based that is inherently better, and there is no blame attached to
    > Microsoft for this per-se, much has changed since W95, however I do
    > think maybe they would have done better to design a more isolated core
    > than to continue this never ending "Integration" between Apps like IE
    > and the OS itself.
    >
    > As for compatibility, well, I seen no real need for our server at work
    > to look and feel like XP, but it does, as do all the rest of them.
    > Having system updates brought in by a "Browser" for example seems
    > counter intuitive when you think about it.


    Definitely. I really like the whole package manager concept much better
    for updates. I use an IBM thinkpad tablet at work, and I was thrilled
    when I saw how easy it is to check for updates for drivers, IBM
    software, etc. because they designed a package manager for Windows that
    finds all the updates for you and you can just pick and choose what you
    would like to update. I found it quite ironic when I learned that most
    of the features on the IBM website for PC support were supported on IE only.

    --
    Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
    http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

    "Fair use is not merely a nice concept--it is a federal law based on
    free speech rights under the First Amendment and is a cornerstone of the
    creativity and innovation that is a hallmark of this country. Consumer
    rights in the digital age are not frivolous."
    - Maura Corbett
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Sep 24, 2007
    #15
  16. dennis@home Guest

    "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    news:Oq9i2Vj$...

    >
    >> A user shouldn't really need to research to see if an OS supports a
    >> standard display mode.

    >
    >
    >
    > Then why are users constantly told here that many of their problems are
    > due to their lack of research?


    There is a big difference between expecting an OS to support a standard
    operating mode and expecting it to support every bit of odd hardware.
    This is the PC world which is an open platform, mainly due to M$ selling
    windows/dos to anyone that wanted to build a clone PC.
    If they hadn't we would have had expensive IBM PCs and expensive Macs both
    running on fixed hardware and none of this compatibility afford a computer.
    Its worth remembering that incompatible hardware is the price we pay for
    having so much choice and it could have been so different if M$ had sold
    exclusive rights to windows/dos to IBM, no affordable clones, no internet as
    we know it, no linux..
     
    dennis@home, Sep 24, 2007
    #16
  17. Guest

    "dennis@home" <-ass.net> wrote:

    >running on fixed hardware and none of this compatibility afford a computer.
    >Its worth remembering that incompatible hardware is the price we pay for
    >having so much choice and it could have been so different if M$ had sold
    >exclusive rights to windows/dos to IBM, no affordable clones, no internet as
    >we know it, no linux..


    And then AmigA would of ruled the world as it was ment to.


    --

    Get the whole thing.
    http://www.transbuddha.com/mediaHolder.php?id=1142
     
    , Sep 24, 2007
    #17
  18. dennis@home Guest

    "dennis@home" <-ass.net> wrote in message
    news:OBEveHn$...

    > There is a big difference between expecting an OS to support a standard
    > operating mode and expecting it to support every bit of odd hardware.
    > This is the PC world which is an open platform, mainly due to M$ selling
    > windows/dos to anyone that wanted to build a clone PC.
    > If they hadn't we would have had expensive IBM PCs and expensive Macs both
    > running on fixed hardware and none of this compatibility afford a
    > computer. Its worth remembering that incompatible hardware is the price we
    > pay for having so much choice and it could have been so different if M$
    > had sold exclusive rights to windows/dos to IBM, no affordable clones, no
    > internet as we know it, no linux..
    >
    >


    s/afford\ a/affordable/g
     
    dennis@home, Sep 24, 2007
    #18
  19. Stephan Rose Guest

    On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 07:11:52 +0100, dennis@home wrote:

    > "Charlie Tame" <> wrote in message
    > news:Oq9i2Vj$...
    >
    >
    >>> A user shouldn't really need to research to see if an OS supports a
    >>> standard display mode.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Then why are users constantly told here that many of their problems are
    >> due to their lack of research?

    >
    > There is a big difference between expecting an OS to support a standard
    > operating mode and expecting it to support every bit of odd hardware.


    Well on that note, Vista does not out of the box support my nVidia 8800
    GTX which definitely is not in the "odd hardware" category. The best
    choice of a screen resolution that Vista gave me was 1024x768 on a
    1600x1200 monitor.

    Ubuntu supports it out of the box and instantly gives me the correct
    resolution.

    Vista, I needed to hunt down a beta driver to make it work. Having to use
    Beta drivers on a production machine 6 months after an OS' release is
    pathetic.

    Now one could blame nVidia for this, but then again, nVidia had full
    support for Linux for their 8800 GTX cards from day one and Ubuntu 7.10
    will recognize it out of the box. If I didn't need full 3D Acceleration I
    could even just run the open source driver and not even bother clicking
    the "enable" button next to the nVidia proprietary driver. Would save a
    mouse click or two during the install process.

    So if Linux is fully supported, XP is fully supported, but 6 months down
    the line Vista drivers are still in a Beta stage...to me, that points to
    more of a problem with Vista than anything else.

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Sep 24, 2007
    #19
  20. Stephan Rose Guest

    On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 04:20:33 +0200, Hadron wrote:

    > Charlie Tame <> writes:
    >
    >> Tim Smith wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Stephan Rose <> wrote:
    >>>> Very true. Plugging the cable into the connector on the back of the
    >>>> video card and then pushing the power button on that monitor is an
    >>>> extremely difficult task. Oh and, don't forget to plug in the power
    >>>> cord.
    >>>
    >>> Getting the video modes right can sometimes be a bit of a challenge
    >>> for many.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yes it can but Ubuntu is easier than most and these kinds of things get
    >> easier all the time.

    >
    >
    > But a quick visit to Google reveals all sorts of issues. Look up getting
    > Beryl to work on Debian for example.


    One can always find a problem with anything if one looks for it. A quick
    visit to google can also reveal all sorts of issues that people can have
    doing a simple task such as breathing! Breathing must suck apparently...

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Sep 24, 2007
    #20
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