Re: Cursed computer

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by impossible, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I asked my friend if their house had been built over an old Maori
    > burial site. This is the computer that had the constant screen
    > blanking problem, now fixed with the installation of a HD2600 XT video
    > card. The monitor is just fine now, menus noticeably much faster.
    > But since I uninstalled the integrated Radeon X1250 (AMD 690G chipset)
    > and installed the new card with the latest Catalyst 8.5 driver for the
    > card, and a Logitech webcam, the onboard RealTek 883 sound has gone.
    > There was a yellow mark over something in System Device Manager but
    > that went when I reinstalled the sound drivers, but still no sound,
    > nothing, not from soundcard mixer's tester, DVD or CD, either from
    > back headphone socket or front, speakers or headphones. Everything in
    > the mixer looks OK as does everything in Device Manager, which reports
    > everything working properly. I have never come across so troublesome
    > a computer. Anyone else had this much trouble with a PC?
    >
    > I am getting the impression that integrated components are simply not
    > worth bothering with.
    >
    > Would I be advised to disable onboard sound and go for a seperate
    > soundcard? If so, any recommendations for a cheapie? I am looking at
    > Genius Soundmaker Live 5.1 Value DVD PCI, Creative SoundBlaster 5.1
    > PCI, or a Creative Audigy SE SB0570 PCI, listed in order of price. I
    > believe the last one has the lowest CPU usage?
    >


    Just re-install the RealTek sound driver, and then check in Control Panel |
    Sounds... | Audio that Realtek (not ATI) is your default device. With ATI
    cards that feature HD video/sound, the installation typically assumes that
    you want the HD components to rule, and so it just changes your settings
    without ever asling. Really annoying -- but easily enough fixed.
     
    impossible, Jun 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 12:28:16 GMT, "impossible" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>>I asked my friend if their house had been built over an old Maori
    >>> burial site. This is the computer that had the constant screen
    >>> blanking problem, now fixed with the installation of a HD2600 XT video
    >>> card. The monitor is just fine now, menus noticeably much faster.
    >>> But since I uninstalled the integrated Radeon X1250 (AMD 690G chipset)
    >>> and installed the new card with the latest Catalyst 8.5 driver for the
    >>> card, and a Logitech webcam, the onboard RealTek 883 sound has gone.
    >>> There was a yellow mark over something in System Device Manager but
    >>> that went when I reinstalled the sound drivers, but still no sound,
    >>> nothing, not from soundcard mixer's tester, DVD or CD, either from
    >>> back headphone socket or front, speakers or headphones. Everything in
    >>> the mixer looks OK as does everything in Device Manager, which reports
    >>> everything working properly. I have never come across so troublesome
    >>> a computer. Anyone else had this much trouble with a PC?
    >>>
    >>> I am getting the impression that integrated components are simply not
    >>> worth bothering with.
    >>>
    >>> Would I be advised to disable onboard sound and go for a seperate
    >>> soundcard? If so, any recommendations for a cheapie? I am looking at
    >>> Genius Soundmaker Live 5.1 Value DVD PCI, Creative SoundBlaster 5.1
    >>> PCI, or a Creative Audigy SE SB0570 PCI, listed in order of price. I
    >>> believe the last one has the lowest CPU usage?
    >>>

    >>
    >>Just re-install the RealTek sound driver, and then check in Control Panel
    >>|
    >>Sounds... | Audio that Realtek (not ATI) is your default device. With ATI
    >>cards that feature HD video/sound, the installation typically assumes that
    >>you want the HD components to rule, and so it just changes your settings
    >>without ever asling. Really annoying -- but easily enough fixed.
    >>

    > I went up their tonight and found that the RealTek was the default. I
    > ended up booting it on my bootable Linux USB key, which has played MP3
    > audio files on that PC before but this time it was like in Windows -
    > no sound. It went through the motions of playing the file, visual
    > effects, progress bar moving across, but no sound. There is a little
    > crackling in the left speaker/headphone. Seems like hardware.
    >
    > The only thing that was changed in the BIOS was the video setting,
    > from onboard to PCIe. With onboard sound there are no cables to come
    > unplugged.
    >
    >


    And after you reinstalled the RealTek driver...?
     
    impossible, Jun 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. impossible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    > The fact that it does exactly the same when booting up on the Linux
    > key which previously played the sound flawlessly, shows that it is a
    > hardware failure of some sort.


    Not true. The actual problem could be (and it seems likely to me) that the
    'soundcard' is disabled by the BIOS, either by user setting, a seemingly
    unrelated user setting, or by the new BIOS version.

    Just a thought....
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
     
    ~misfit~, Jun 14, 2008
    #3
  4. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 12:01:01 GMT, "impossible" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 12:28:16 GMT, "impossible" <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>>I asked my friend if their house had been built over an old Maori
    >>>>> burial site. This is the computer that had the constant screen
    >>>>> blanking problem, now fixed with the installation of a HD2600 XT video
    >>>>> card. The monitor is just fine now, menus noticeably much faster.
    >>>>> But since I uninstalled the integrated Radeon X1250 (AMD 690G chipset)
    >>>>> and installed the new card with the latest Catalyst 8.5 driver for the
    >>>>> card, and a Logitech webcam, the onboard RealTek 883 sound has gone.
    >>>>> There was a yellow mark over something in System Device Manager but
    >>>>> that went when I reinstalled the sound drivers, but still no sound,
    >>>>> nothing, not from soundcard mixer's tester, DVD or CD, either from
    >>>>> back headphone socket or front, speakers or headphones. Everything in
    >>>>> the mixer looks OK as does everything in Device Manager, which reports
    >>>>> everything working properly. I have never come across so troublesome
    >>>>> a computer. Anyone else had this much trouble with a PC?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I am getting the impression that integrated components are simply not
    >>>>> worth bothering with.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Would I be advised to disable onboard sound and go for a seperate
    >>>>> soundcard? If so, any recommendations for a cheapie? I am looking at
    >>>>> Genius Soundmaker Live 5.1 Value DVD PCI, Creative SoundBlaster 5.1
    >>>>> PCI, or a Creative Audigy SE SB0570 PCI, listed in order of price. I
    >>>>> believe the last one has the lowest CPU usage?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Just re-install the RealTek sound driver, and then check in Control
    >>>>Panel
    >>>>|
    >>>>Sounds... | Audio that Realtek (not ATI) is your default device. With
    >>>>ATI
    >>>>cards that feature HD video/sound, the installation typically assumes
    >>>>that
    >>>>you want the HD components to rule, and so it just changes your settings
    >>>>without ever asling. Really annoying -- but easily enough fixed.
    >>>>
    >>> I went up their tonight and found that the RealTek was the default. I
    >>> ended up booting it on my bootable Linux USB key, which has played MP3
    >>> audio files on that PC before but this time it was like in Windows -
    >>> no sound. It went through the motions of playing the file, visual
    >>> effects, progress bar moving across, but no sound. There is a little
    >>> crackling in the left speaker/headphone. Seems like hardware.
    >>>
    >>> The only thing that was changed in the BIOS was the video setting,
    >>> from onboard to PCIe. With onboard sound there are no cables to come
    >>> unplugged.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>And after you reinstalled the RealTek driver...?
    >>

    > I tried uninstalling the sound in Device Manager and rebooting but
    > still no sound. I reinstalled the RealTek HD drivers from the ASUS
    > CD, but no fix.
    >
    > The fact that it does exactly the same when booting up on the Linux
    > key which previously played the sound flawlessly, shows that it is a
    > hardware failure of some sort. I have emailed ASUS support and the
    > outfit in Auckland that RMAed the mobo previously with an extensive
    > account.
    >
    > In the meantime I think the best option would be to get the Creative
    > Audigy SE, $52 at TasTech, probably the best as far as I can gather in
    > the cheap range. The Genius looked just too old and low quality,
    > thumbs down on a review.
    >
    >


    I'm not convinced yet that your onboard sound is dead. You seem anxious to
    move on and get a sound card, which is perfectly understandable. But given
    what you've described -- loss of sound coincident with the installation of
    conflicting HD audio drivers -- hardware failure seems very unlikely. The
    fact that you get no sound now running under either Windows or Linux only
    confirms that the audio system is badly configured (not buggered), and if
    that's the case then it might be worth your while to take another crack at
    it..

    If you care to go that route (and I really can't blame you if at this point
    you simply can't be bothered), then I'd suggest you start by going back to
    the Asus site and grab all the latest updates. Between February 2007 and
    today, I count 10 bios updates, 4 chipset updates, and 5 audio driver
    updates for that motherboard -- any one of which might have been designed to
    avoid exactly the sort of problems you've experienced, first with the
    onboard video and now with the onboard sound. Then uninstall the new video
    card, revert back temporarily to your original setup with the onboard video,
    load all the default bios settings, and see what you've got.
     
    impossible, Jun 14, 2008
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > But browsing forums I find that others have had the same problem,
    > audio OK until separate video card added. One thing that is clear,
    > this particular mobo has a reputation of being particularly buggy -
    > witness the trouble everyone had with trying to drive large panels
    > with the onboard video, fixed only by adding a video card. BIOS
    > updates didn't help. ASUS had no fix for it.
    >


    That's beginning to sound like you got one of the 'shite' mobos
    that Asus have put out from time to time. I once had a TX-97 (I
    think) that was a DOG. When Asus are good, they're good,
    excellent even, but when they're bad .... omfg. And the only
    way you'll get help is from other users.

    -Peter

    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
    Peter Huebner, Jun 14, 2008
    #5
  6. In article <>, Nighthawk did
    write:

    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 01:51:41 +1200, Mark Robinson
    > <2tod.net> wrote:
    >
    >>What do dmesg and lspci have to say ?

    >
    > What is that?


    Terminal commands.

    dmesg -- show kernel log buffer
    lspci -- list items identified on PCI bus (this includes onboard hardware).
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 14, 2008
    #6
  7. impossible

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 22:41:50 +1200, Nighthawk <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 12:28:16 GMT, "impossible" <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>"Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>>I asked my friend if their house had been built over an old Maori
    >>> burial site. This is the computer that had the constant screen
    >>> blanking problem, now fixed with the installation of a HD2600 XT video
    >>> card. The monitor is just fine now, menus noticeably much faster.
    >>> But since I uninstalled the integrated Radeon X1250 (AMD 690G chipset)
    >>> and installed the new card with the latest Catalyst 8.5 driver for the
    >>> card, and a Logitech webcam, the onboard RealTek 883 sound has gone.
    >>> There was a yellow mark over something in System Device Manager but
    >>> that went when I reinstalled the sound drivers, but still no sound,
    >>> nothing, not from soundcard mixer's tester, DVD or CD, either from
    >>> back headphone socket or front, speakers or headphones. Everything in
    >>> the mixer looks OK as does everything in Device Manager, which reports
    >>> everything working properly. I have never come across so troublesome
    >>> a computer. Anyone else had this much trouble with a PC?
    >>>
    >>> I am getting the impression that integrated components are simply not
    >>> worth bothering with.
    >>>
    >>> Would I be advised to disable onboard sound and go for a seperate
    >>> soundcard? If so, any recommendations for a cheapie? I am looking at
    >>> Genius Soundmaker Live 5.1 Value DVD PCI, Creative SoundBlaster 5.1
    >>> PCI, or a Creative Audigy SE SB0570 PCI, listed in order of price. I
    >>> believe the last one has the lowest CPU usage?
    >>>

    >>
    >>Just re-install the RealTek sound driver, and then check in Control Panel |
    >>Sounds... | Audio that Realtek (not ATI) is your default device. With ATI
    >>cards that feature HD video/sound, the installation typically assumes that
    >>you want the HD components to rule, and so it just changes your settings
    >>without ever asling. Really annoying -- but easily enough fixed.
    >>

    >I went up their tonight and found that the RealTek was the default. I
    >ended up booting it on my bootable Linux USB key, which has played MP3
    >audio files on that PC before but this time it was like in Windows -
    >no sound. It went through the motions of playing the file, visual
    >effects, progress bar moving across, but no sound. There is a little
    >crackling in the left speaker/headphone. Seems like hardware.
    >
    >The only thing that was changed in the BIOS was the video setting,
    >from onboard to PCIe. With onboard sound there are no cables to come
    >unplugged.


    Some dumb suggestions, but you never know, sometimes we all miss the
    obvious.
    What about the cable that plugs into the back (the speakler cable), is
    it in the correct hole? Hasn't been moved at all has it? Usually
    it'll be the green one it needs to go into.
    Also the socket on the front of the machine quite often disconnects
    the rear port when there is a plug present in the front. Is the socket
    okay?
    Guessing it's only you that's played with the mainboard so this
    probably won't be the case, but there are also jumpers on some
    motherboards to direct the sound to the back or front.
     
    Craig Shore, Jun 14, 2008
    #7
  8. impossible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 11:05:26 +1200, "~misfit~"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    >>> The fact that it does exactly the same when booting up on the Linux
    >>> key which previously played the sound flawlessly, shows that it is a
    >>> hardware failure of some sort.

    >>
    >> Not true. The actual problem could be (and it seems likely to me)
    >> that the 'soundcard' is disabled by the BIOS, either by user
    >> setting, a seemingly unrelated user setting, or by the new BIOS
    >> version.
    >>
    >> Just a thought....

    >
    > The only thing that was changed in BIOS was the video, from onboard to
    > PCIe. I did also disable legacy floppy disc as there isn't one
    > installed but I can't see how that could affect sound. Prior to
    > installing the video card the sound was working perfectly, under
    > Windows and Linux. Now it doesn't work at all under Windows and
    > Linux.


    I'd put the video back to onboard in BIOS, just to check. (It'll probably
    use the PCIe anyway if it's fitted.) I'd also enable floppy again. You gotta
    check these things, retrace steps, not just throw your hands up and buy a
    sound card. (Didn't you mention that the BIOS was updated too?)

    Well I think so anyway. I concede that is is different if you don't have
    extended access to the machine in question.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
     
    ~misfit~, Jun 14, 2008
    #8
  9. impossible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 21:02:05 +1200, "~misfit~"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    >>> On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 11:05:26 +1200, "~misfit~"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    >>>>> The fact that it does exactly the same when booting up on the
    >>>>> Linux key which previously played the sound flawlessly, shows
    >>>>> that it is a hardware failure of some sort.
    >>>>
    >>>> Not true. The actual problem could be (and it seems likely to me)
    >>>> that the 'soundcard' is disabled by the BIOS, either by user
    >>>> setting, a seemingly unrelated user setting, or by the new BIOS
    >>>> version.
    >>>>
    >>>> Just a thought....
    >>>
    >>> The only thing that was changed in BIOS was the video, from onboard
    >>> to PCIe. I did also disable legacy floppy disc as there isn't one
    >>> installed but I can't see how that could affect sound. Prior to
    >>> installing the video card the sound was working perfectly, under
    >>> Windows and Linux. Now it doesn't work at all under Windows and
    >>> Linux.

    >>
    >> I'd put the video back to onboard in BIOS, just to check. (It'll
    >> probably use the PCIe anyway if it's fitted.) I'd also enable floppy
    >> again. You gotta check these things, retrace steps, not just throw
    >> your hands up and buy a sound card. (Didn't you mention that the
    >> BIOS was updated too?)
    >>
    >> Well I think so anyway. I concede that is is different if you don't
    >> have extended access to the machine in question.
    >>

    > With a soundcard like the Audigy SE being only $52 at TasTech, that is
    > a cheap enough way out.
    >
    > You see, I have been battling this mobo since March when the original
    > problem looked like a faulty monitor, which other people said they
    > have had, with the same symptoms. As the original one had a dead
    > pixel out of the box that was a good excuse to get another monitor.
    > Another fix people reported was changing the cables, which we did, to
    > no avail. Then it looked like the graphics chip dying, which one shop
    > said they had seen a few of, but after RMA the mobo, the new (used)
    > one did it too. Thinking (correctly I believe) that is was a power
    > supply problem I had a good look at the PSU, finding that the
    > ThermalTake 430W was over-rated crap, only 16A, tested, on the 12V
    > rail, so that seemed very likely to be the culprit, but the new
    > Enermax didn't fix it. Getting the new PSU was a blessing in disguise
    > as we would likely have trouble with the new HD2600XT video card with
    > the original. (The 2600XT is going brilliantly, BTW). So that all
    > comes back to the faulty mobo. I believe that the power supply to the
    > graphics chipset is inherently flawed, which would explain why it was
    > stable at lower resolutions but couldn't handle higher resolutions.
    > It got especially unstable when displaying bright backgrounds, like
    > Windows Explorer fullscreen or if you set a highly saturated
    > background colour, which my friend found easy for reading icon labels.
    > I believe that trying to run it at high res for a time has stressed
    > the power supply components.
    >
    > But the other problem, as you mentioned, is access to it. I don't
    > have a car at the moment and have to get picked up, which all adds to
    > the strain. Fortunately he has enough understanding of how things
    > work to realise that these things happen, though we both have been
    > running out of patience.


    Understood. Thanks for the explain. :)
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
     
    ~misfit~, Jun 14, 2008
    #9
  10. impossible

    w_tom Guest

    On Jun 14, 8:07 am, Nighthawk <> wrote:
    > I checked all those, even tried headphones in the rear speaker socket.
    > Previously everything was working, front and back.  No jumper pins to
    > set.  You can hear pops from the speakers when it is booting up, like
    > normal.  Nothing is on mute and all the sliders in the mixer are well
    > up.


    Adding to a list of overlooked obvious solutions - are both sound
    card and speakers in either analog mode or digital mode? Does that
    option exist with these components?

    Then get the manufacturer diagnostics. Part of your complication is
    too many ingredients inside a test procedure. Manufacturer diagnostic
    execute without additional complications from the OS, drivers, mute
    and volume controls, and so many other variables. This is why all
    responsible computer manufacturers provided comprehensive diagnostics
    - for free. If yours is not so responsible, then locate diagnostics
    from a component manufacturer. If he cannot provide free diagnostics,
    well, you saved money.

    Another reason for so much confusion is too much shotgunning.
    Everything has been replaced only on wild speculation: it could be
    this or might be that. For example, you don't know if the old power
    supply was defective and don't know if the new power supply has the
    same defect. Before replacing any part, you should know it is
    defective AND see the replacement part correct that defect. Anything
    less means nothing was accomplished. This is why we measure those
    voltages before replacing anything AND measure those voltages again if
    a new power supply is installed. This is why we use diagnostics to
    find a failure before replacing anything.

    Shotgunning can also exponentially complicate a problem. Having
    replaced so many parts, a second problem may have been created -
    meaning a solution has been made exponentially more difficult.

    Back up. Break the problem down into parts. Currently most all the
    machine remains completely unknown. Measure those power supply
    voltages when supply is under maximum load. Execute a component
    diagnostic. Also collect facts from the system (event) logs and
    Device Manager. Determine if analog / digital options exist both on
    speakers and on sound card output. Noise from speakers during power
    on only says speaker is connected to something; says nothing about
    anything working properly or connected properly.
     
    w_tom, Jun 14, 2008
    #10
  11. impossible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Nighthawk" typed:
    > On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 00:33:49 +1200, Nighthawk <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 18:37:10 +1200, Peter Huebner
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> says...
    >>>>
    >>>> But browsing forums I find that others have had the same problem,
    >>>> audio OK until separate video card added. One thing that is clear,
    >>>> this particular mobo has a reputation of being particularly buggy -
    >>>> witness the trouble everyone had with trying to drive large panels
    >>>> with the onboard video, fixed only by adding a video card. BIOS
    >>>> updates didn't help. ASUS had no fix for it.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> That's beginning to sound like you got one of the 'shite' mobos
    >>> that Asus have put out from time to time. I once had a TX-97 (I
    >>> think) that was a DOG. When Asus are good, they're good,
    >>> excellent even, but when they're bad .... omfg. And the only
    >>> way you'll get help is from other users.
    >>>
    >>> -Peter

    >>
    >> Yes, you're right. I have sent a comprehensive report to ASUS
    >> support and to the people in Auckland who RMA the mobo. (I had
    >> explained to them that Linux had produced the same symptoms and they
    >> replied: "Please advice the customer this model of motherboard is
    >> compatible with O/S Windows Vista/XP, not suitable in Linux". !!!
    >>
    >> I have found that Puppy Linux works particularly well, auto-detecting
    >> the hardware and setting it all up just fine, with everything
    >> working, including being able to set 1920x1200 resolution, which I
    >> have not been able to do with other live Linux bootable distros.
    >>

    > posted too soon. I meant to say that I am going to try to force ASUS
    > to admit this is a faulty motherboard, design-wise. Their
    > implimentation of the AMD 690G chipset was rushed and faulty.
    >
    > In the ASUS forums many people complain that some newer BIOS updates
    > have broken things and recent updates prevent one from going back to
    > an older one.


    Mate, I don't think you're going to get *that* admission. There'd be
    thousands of people all over the US clamouring for full refunds, loss of
    production and upset cats <g> and requiring massive compensation from Asus.
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
     
    ~misfit~, Jun 15, 2008
    #11
  12. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Nighthawk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 04:52:34 GMT, "impossible" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>>And after you reinstalled the RealTek driver...?
    >>>>
    >>> I tried uninstalling the sound in Device Manager and rebooting but
    >>> still no sound. I reinstalled the RealTek HD drivers from the ASUS
    >>> CD, but no fix.
    >>>
    >>> The fact that it does exactly the same when booting up on the Linux
    >>> key which previously played the sound flawlessly, shows that it is a
    >>> hardware failure of some sort. I have emailed ASUS support and the
    >>> outfit in Auckland that RMAed the mobo previously with an extensive
    >>> account.
    >>>
    >>> In the meantime I think the best option would be to get the Creative
    >>> Audigy SE, $52 at TasTech, probably the best as far as I can gather in
    >>> the cheap range. The Genius looked just too old and low quality,
    >>> thumbs down on a review.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I'm not convinced yet that your onboard sound is dead. You seem anxious to
    >>move on and get a sound card, which is perfectly understandable. But given
    >>what you've described -- loss of sound coincident with the installation of
    >>conflicting HD audio drivers -- hardware failure seems very unlikely. The
    >>fact that you get no sound now running under either Windows or Linux only
    >>confirms that the audio system is badly configured (not buggered), and if
    >>that's the case then it might be worth your while to take another crack at
    >>it..
    >>
    >>If you care to go that route (and I really can't blame you if at this
    >>point
    >>you simply can't be bothered), then I'd suggest you start by going back to
    >>the Asus site and grab all the latest updates. Between February 2007 and
    >>today, I count 10 bios updates, 4 chipset updates, and 5 audio driver
    >>updates for that motherboard -- any one of which might have been designed
    >>to
    >>avoid exactly the sort of problems you've experienced, first with the
    >>onboard video and now with the onboard sound. Then uninstall the new video
    >>card, revert back temporarily to your original setup with the onboard
    >>video,
    >>load all the default bios settings, and see what you've got.
    >>

    > It is the owner of the PC that is anxious to get it going properly and
    > is prepared to pay for a SoundBlaster Audigy SE card to do so. This
    > card is a lot better than onboard audio anyway, with less CPU load.
    > Besides, I have been wrestling with this motherboard since March and
    > have had a gutsful of it.
    >
    > I don't understand what you could be talking about saying "the audio
    > system is badly configured". In BIOS it is either enabled or
    > disabled.


    This is what you said:

    "But since I uninstalled the integrated Radeon X1250 (AMD 690G chipset)
    and installed the new card with the latest Catalyst 8.5 driver for the
    card, and a Logitech webcam, the onboard RealTek 883 sound has gone.
    There was a yellow mark over something in System Device Manager but
    that went when I reinstalled the sound drivers, but still no sound,
    nothing, not from soundcard mixer's tester, DVD or CD, either from
    back headphone socket or front, speakers or headphones. Everything in
    the mixer looks OK as does everything in Device Manager, which reports
    everything working properly."

    That's not a description of a hardware failure -- that's a description of a
    driver/configuration problem of some sort.

    > The BIOS version is very recent. The updated drivers you
    > talk about are for Windows, not Linux. The fact that Linux exactly
    > mirrors what is happening under Windows, which surely rules out driver
    > issues, tells me the problem is deeper - hardware.


    Huh? Your friend's machine runs Windows, is that right? And until you
    installed a new video card, the onboard sound on this machine worked just
    fine under Windows, is that right? Then put your Linux boot drive away,
    because it's not going to help you solve this problem one bit. If you're not
    interested in troubleshooting, that's one thing, but don't pretend you know
    what's really going on with that machine without having done even the ABC
    sort of things that would allow you to sort out the many possibilities.

    > Remember: the
    > audio worked fine under Linux before the video card was installed.


    Hmmm...worked fine under Windows, too, didn't it?

    > The onboard audio isn't disabled. I have definitely looked at that.
    >


    Well, it obviously **is** disabled. You just haven't figured out how/why
    yet.

    > But browsing forums I find that others have had the same problem,
    > audio OK until separate video card added. One thing that is clear,
    > this particular mobo has a reputation of being particularly buggy -
    > witness the trouble everyone had with trying to drive large panels
    > with the onboard video, fixed only by adding a video card. BIOS
    > updates didn't help. ASUS had no fix for it.
    >


    If "everyone" came to this conclusion after doing as little troubleshooting
    as you have, I wouldn't pay any mind.
     
    impossible, Jun 15, 2008
    #12
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