Re: Component Cable Question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David Ruether, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    news::
    > On 2011-06-12 09:38 , David Ruether wrote:
    > > "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    > > news::
    > >> On 2011-06-12 08:38 , Bob wrote:


    > >> When I bought my widescreen television, the store HDMI was $60.00. I
    > >> bought it at the local electronics store for less than $20.


    > > A good place to look (there may be other similar places...) is
    > > www.monoprice.com - the prices are *VERY* low, shipping is fast
    > > and the rates are low, and the cables and adapters appear to be
    > > of good quality. The only time I got "caught" was with an HDMI
    > > cable that didn't have an iron "blob" RF-blocker on it and
    > > something caused interference with the video signal.


    > A correctly terminated cable should be no issue. You can also buy a
    > ferrite bead (choke) and just add it to the cable - though it might be
    > tough finding one that's a snug fit - but that shouldn't matter - just
    > tape it in place.


    Since a good 6' HDMI cable (with gold connections, even!;-)
    including the ferrite bead is about $6 from monoprice, it
    was easier to just order another cable. BTW, some of their
    HDMI cables come with in-wall tough casings (which makes
    them VERY stiff), so I've learned to avoid those in addition
    to making sure there is the ferrite bead "blob" on the
    cable (and also in addition to ordering a cable with the
    right terminals!;-). Monoprice is good about returns and
    exchanges, though...
    --DR
    David Ruether, Jun 14, 2011
    #1
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  2. On 6/14/11 9:05 AM, David Ruether wrote: "Alan Browne"
    <> wrote in message

    >> A correctly terminated cable should be no issue. You can also buy a
    >> ferrite bead (choke) and just add it to the cable - though it might be
    >> tough finding one that's a snug fit - but that shouldn't matter - just
    >> tape it in place.

    >
    > Since a good 6' HDMI cable (with gold connections, even!;-)
    > including the ferrite bead is about $6 from monoprice, it
    > was easier to just order another cable. BTW, some of their
    > HDMI cables come with in-wall tough casings (which makes
    > them VERY stiff), so I've learned to avoid those in addition
    > to making sure there is the ferrite bead "blob" on the
    > cable (and also in addition to ordering a cable with the
    > right terminals!;-). Monoprice is good about returns and
    > exchanges, though...


    I've heard nothing but good reports on Monoprice, and will use them on
    next purchase. In the recent past, good buys at Amazon, though usually
    in connection with other purchases.

    A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    if one is useful?
    John McWilliams, Jun 14, 2011
    #2
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  3. "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    news:it8440$3hj$:
    > On 6/14/11 9:05 AM, David Ruether wrote: "Alan Browne"
    > <> wrote in message


    > >> A correctly terminated cable should be no issue. You can also buy a
    > >> ferrite bead (choke) and just add it to the cable - though it might be
    > >> tough finding one that's a snug fit - but that shouldn't matter - just
    > >> tape it in place.


    > > Since a good 6' HDMI cable (with gold connections, even!;-)
    > > including the ferrite bead is about $6 from monoprice, it
    > > was easier to just order another cable. BTW, some of their
    > > HDMI cables come with in-wall tough casings (which makes
    > > them VERY stiff), so I've learned to avoid those in addition
    > > to making sure there is the ferrite bead "blob" on the
    > > cable (and also in addition to ordering a cable with the
    > > right terminals!;-). Monoprice is good about returns and
    > > exchanges, though...
    > > --DR


    > I've heard nothing but good reports on Monoprice, and will use them on
    > next purchase. In the recent past, good buys at Amazon, though usually
    > in connection with other purchases.
    >
    > A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    > Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    > if one is useful?


    I saw some minor but very apparent horizontal breakup in the
    picture, corrected when I switched to a cable with the bead
    in place.
    --DR
    David Ruether, Jun 15, 2011
    #3
  4. David Ruether

    Bob Dobbs Guest

    David Ruether wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    >> Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    >> if one is useful?

    >
    >I saw some minor but very apparent horizontal breakup in the
    >picture, corrected when I switched to a cable with the bead
    >in place.


    Could that improvement have possibly resulted from the replacement
    activity itself, like moving and maybe re-routing the cable, or just the
    cleansing action of reinserting the plugs?
    --

    http://bit.ly/g2PCII
    Bob Dobbs, Jun 15, 2011
    #4
  5. "Bob Dobbs" <> wrote in message news:
    4df90924.1397359@chupacabra:
    > David Ruether wrote:


    > >> A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    > >> Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    > >> if one is useful?


    > >I saw some minor but very apparent horizontal breakup in the
    > >picture, corrected when I switched to a cable with the bead
    > >in place.


    > Could that improvement have possibly resulted from the replacement
    > activity itself, like moving and maybe re-routing the cable, or just the
    > cleansing action of reinserting the plugs?
    > --
    > http://bit.ly/g2PCII


    Unlikely since I pulled/reinserted the plugs at both ends
    a few times with the old cable and the routing was the same
    with the new cable (and a properly-made and RF-filtered
    cable should not show interference effects in this application
    no matter how it is routed unless the source of the interference
    was ...).
    --DR
    David Ruether, Jun 15, 2011
    #5
  6. David Ruether

    Bob Dobbs Guest

    David Ruether wrote:
    >
    >
    >"Bob Dobbs" <> wrote in message news:
    >4df90924.1397359@chupacabra:
    >> David Ruether wrote:

    >
    >> >> A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    >> >> Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    >> >> if one is useful?

    >
    >> >I saw some minor but very apparent horizontal breakup in the
    >> >picture, corrected when I switched to a cable with the bead
    >> >in place.

    >
    >> Could that improvement have possibly resulted from the replacement
    >> activity itself, like moving and maybe re-routing the cable, or just the
    >> cleansing action of reinserting the plugs?
    >> --
    >> http://bit.ly/g2PCII

    >
    >Unlikely since I pulled/reinserted the plugs at both ends
    >a few times with the old cable and the routing was the same
    >with the new cable (and a properly-made and RF-filtered
    >cable should not show interference effects in this application
    >no matter how it is routed unless the source of the interference
    >was ...).
    >--DR


    I was just thinking of rat's nests I've had in the past with some cumulative
    ad hoc installations as I was able to add gear to the stack.
    Sometimes you just have to pull it all apart and redo it with cosmetic factors
    in mind, of course the ferrite chokes are mandatory in my systems, bundling
    various cables together and decoupling any surface currents.
    BTW: I have an active HAM shack in another room, and although I seldom run both
    together, I feel it's safer to avoid RF overload and component burnout.
    I did once have an instance where I had a TV on and powered and the RF from the
    transmitter was too proximal to the TV's rooftop yagi and killed it, best I
    could tell from terminal symptoms and location of charring was an overload and
    melting of the TV's flyback XFMR.
    --

    http://bit.ly/g2PCII
    Bob Dobbs, Jun 16, 2011
    #6
  7. "Bob Dobbs" <> wrote in message news:
    4df94535.1716531@chupacabra:
    > David Ruether wrote:
    > >"Bob Dobbs" <> wrote in message news:
    > >4df90924.1397359@chupacabra:
    > >> David Ruether wrote:


    > >> >> A few HDMI and DVI cables have the ferrite choke, but several don't.
    > >> >> Never noticed a difference in using either. Where/how would it show up
    > >> >> if one is useful?


    > >> >I saw some minor but very apparent horizontal breakup in the
    > >> >picture, corrected when I switched to a cable with the bead
    > >> >in place. (DR)


    > >> Could that improvement have possibly resulted from the replacement
    > >> activity itself, like moving and maybe re-routing the cable, or just the
    > >> cleansing action of reinserting the plugs?
    > >> --
    > >> http://bit.ly/g2PCII


    > >Unlikely since I pulled/reinserted the plugs at both ends
    > >a few times with the old cable and the routing was the same
    > >with the new cable (and a properly-made and RF-filtered
    > >cable should not show interference effects in this application
    > >no matter how it is routed unless the source of the interference
    > >was [unusually strong]...).
    > >--DR


    > I was just thinking of rat's nests I've had in the past with some cumulative
    > ad hoc installations as I was able to add gear to the stack.
    > Sometimes you just have to pull it all apart and redo it with cosmetic factors
    > in mind, of course the ferrite chokes are mandatory in my systems, bundling
    > various cables together and decoupling any surface currents.
    > BTW: I have an active HAM shack in another room, and although I seldom run both
    > together, I feel it's safer to avoid RF overload and component burnout.
    > I did once have an instance where I had a TV on and powered and the RF from the
    > transmitter was too proximal to the TV's rooftop yagi and killed it, best I
    > could tell from terminal symptoms and location of charring was an overload and
    > melting of the TV's flyback XFMR.
    > --
    > http://bit.ly/g2PCII


    Makes one wonder about the possible effects of RF on people, let
    alone on gear.... (or, let's all stick our heads in our microwaves,
    and find out...! 8^).
    --DR
    David Ruether, Jun 16, 2011
    #7
  8. David Ruether

    ASCII Guest

    David Ruether wrote:
    >
    >Makes one wonder about the possible effects of RF on people,


    http://bit.ly/kfZQf0
    ASCII, Jun 16, 2011
    #8
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